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  • Deshpande and his team created devices using 3-D TIs by stacking five few-atom-thin layers of various materials into sloppy sandwich-like structures. The core of the sandwich is the topological insulator, made from a few quintuple layers of bismuth antimony tellurium selenide (Bi2-xSbxTe3-ySey).
    Su Kong Chong
    Deshpande and his team created devices using 3-D TIs by stacking five few-atom-thin layers of various materials into sloppy sandwich-like structures. The core of the sandwich is the topological insulator, made from a few quintuple layers of bismuth antimony tellurium selenide (Bi2-xSbxTe3-ySey).
  • In the presence of the magnetic field, a checkerboard pattern emerged from the metallic surfaces on the 3-D topological insulator devices (left and right columns correspond to longitudinal and transverse conductivities versus voltages on the two gates; TI thickness reduces going from top to bottom). These checkerboards allow the researchers to track any distortion on the surface. Thinner insulator layers showed a distorted pattern and at 16 nanometers thickness, the intersection points began to break up. This created a gap that indicated that the surfaces were no longer conductive.
    Adapted from Chong et. al. (2019) Physical Review Letters
    In the presence of the magnetic field, a checkerboard pattern emerged from the metallic surfaces on the 3-D topological insulator devices (left and right columns correspond to longitudinal and transverse conductivities versus voltages on the two gates; TI thickness reduces going from top to bottom). These checkerboards allow the researchers to track any distortion on the surface. Thinner insulator layers showed a distorted pattern and at 16 nanometers thickness, the intersection points began to break up. This created a gap that indicated that the surfaces were no longer conductive.
  • Vikram Deshpande, assistant professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy (left) and doctoral candidate Su Kong Chong (right) stand in the “coolest lab on campus.” Deshpande leads a lab that can cool topological materials down to just a few fractions of a degree above absolute zero at -273.15°C (-459.67°F). It is literally the coldest laboratory on campus.
    Lisa Potter/University of Utah
    Vikram Deshpande, assistant professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy (left) and doctoral candidate Su Kong Chong (right) stand in the “coolest lab on campus.” Deshpande leads a lab that can cool topological materials down to just a few fractions of a degree above absolute zero at -273.15°C (-459.67°F). It is literally the coldest laboratory on campus.
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