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  • Princeton University research based in PEI is among the first to identify traits that make certain species more vulnerable than others to human impacts on the environment. The study found that the ability of a Himalayan bird species such as the rufous-capped babbler (above) to adapt to seasonal temperature changes may be one factor in whether it can withstand environmental changes such as deforestation.
    (Photo by Umesh Srinivasan, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs)
    Princeton University research based in PEI is among the first to identify traits that make certain species more vulnerable than others to human impacts on the environment. The study found that the ability of a Himalayan bird species such as the rufous-capped babbler (above) to adapt to seasonal temperature changes may be one factor in whether it can withstand environmental changes such as deforestation.
  • The researchers focused on how temperature changes and the conversion of forests to agricultural land affected 135 bird species in the Himalayas. They found that species living in the seasonal western Himalayas (left) adapted to deforestation better than birds native to the tropical eastern Himalayas.
    (Photo by Paul Elsen, Wildlife Conservation Society)
    The researchers focused on how temperature changes and the conversion of forests to agricultural land affected 135 bird species in the Himalayas. They found that species living in the seasonal western Himalayas (left) adapted to deforestation better than birds native to the tropical eastern Himalayas.
  • Agricultural lands in the eastern Himalayas (left) lack the protection that dense forests provided from temperature swings caused by the sun and wind. Because the eastern Himalayas exhibit more stable temperatures, the birds that call this region home may not be able to tolerate the sudden temperature variation brought on by deforestation. Conversely, birds native to the western Himalayas may better tolerate the temperature swings that are typical of the region.
    (Photo by Umesh Srinivasan, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs)
    Agricultural lands in the eastern Himalayas (left) lack the protection that dense forests provided from temperature swings caused by the sun and wind. Because the eastern Himalayas exhibit more stable temperatures, the birds that call this region home may not be able to tolerate the sudden temperature variation brought on by deforestation. Conversely, birds native to the western Himalayas may better tolerate the temperature swings that are typical of the region.
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