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  • Jeremy Axworthy removes a young coral from a tank at the team's University of Washington lab. The two coral species shown here are Pocillopora damicornis (left), known as cauliflower coral, and Montipora capitatae (right), or rice coral. Cauliflower coral was more likely to ingest microplastics during the team's experiments.
    Dennis Wise/University of Washington
    Jeremy Axworthy removes a young coral from a tank at the team's University of Washington lab. The two coral species shown here are Pocillopora damicornis (left), known as cauliflower coral, and Montipora capitatae (right), or rice coral. Cauliflower coral was more likely to ingest microplastics during the team's experiments.
  • In this demonstration experiment, a black light illuminates microplastics, shown in fluorescent green, in a small tank with one coral species, Pocillopora damicornis, commonly called cauliflower coral.
    Dennis Wise/University of Washington
    In this demonstration experiment, a black light illuminates microplastics, shown in fluorescent green, in a small tank with one coral species, Pocillopora damicornis, commonly called cauliflower coral.
  • Under a black light, fluorescent green microplastics are seen in the water during a small demonstration experiment. In the actual 2018 experiment discussed in this paper, the cauliflower coral seen above ingested microplastics when prey was also present in the water, but avoided eating microplastics when no prey was there.
    Dennis Wise/University of Washington
    Under a black light, fluorescent green microplastics are seen in the water during a small demonstration experiment. In the actual 2018 experiment discussed in this paper, the cauliflower coral seen above ingested microplastics when prey was also present in the water, but avoided eating microplastics when no prey was there.
  • Under a black light, fluorescent green microplastics are seen in the water during a small demonstration experiment. This cauliflower coral's polyps are visible as small, round shapes, and experiments have found these polyps ingest microplastics under certain conditions.
    Dennis Wise/University of Washington
    Under a black light, fluorescent green microplastics are seen in the water during a small demonstration experiment. This cauliflower coral's polyps are visible as small, round shapes, and experiments have found these polyps ingest microplastics under certain conditions.
  • Jacqueline Padilla-Gamiño, left, and Jeremy Axworthy observe a small microplastics feeding demonstration experiment at the team's University of Washington lab.
    Dennis Wise/University of Washington
    Jacqueline Padilla-Gamiño, left, and Jeremy Axworthy observe a small microplastics feeding demonstration experiment at the team's University of Washington lab.
  • Jacqueline Padilla-Gamiño, left, and Jeremy Axworthy discuss their research at the team's University of Washington lab.
    Dennis Wise/University of Washington
    Jacqueline Padilla-Gamiño, left, and Jeremy Axworthy discuss their research at the team's University of Washington lab.
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