Newswise — Rockville, Md. (June 4, 2020)—A newly discovered hormone called phoenixin could play a major role in adjusting a person’s level of thirst to the body’s needs. The discovery of the hormone, which is made in the human body, bolsters scientific data showing that the amount of daily hydration is just as critical as how much food we eat. Phoenixin appears to control changes in thirst and other hormones that regulate body fluid balance that occur with aging, according to a recently published paper in the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology. The study, which was conducted in rats, was chosen as an APSselect article for June.

Researchers focused on the physiologic control of thirst in females, which was more pronounced .

The research—conducted by Saint Louis University School of Medicine scientists who discovered the hormone and its receptor—also shows phoenixin appears to control changes in thirst even during the ovarian cycle and pregnancy.

Read the full article, “A novel regulator of thirst behavior: phoenixin,” published in the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology. It is highlighted as one of this month’s “best of the best” as part of the American Physiological Society’s APSselect program. Read all of this month’s selected research articles.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS: To schedule an interview with a member of the research team, please contact the APS Communications Office or call 301.634.7314. Find more research highlights in our News Room.

Physiology is the study of how molecules, cells, tissues and organs function in health and disease. Established in 1887, the American Physiological Society (APS) was the first U.S. society in the biomedical sciences field. The Society represents 9,000 members and publishes 15 peer-reviewed journals with a worldwide readership.

 

 

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