Newswise — (New York – September 1, 2015) – Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. One in seven men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 233,000 new cases are diagnosed annually. That said, not every diagnosis warrants intervention. Mount experts are using a powerful new technique, MRI Fusion Biopsy, to more accurately diagnose both small and large cancer lesions, treating only the affected areas and monitoring areas that don’t require immediate intervention. Experts are available to comment on this important discussion in the field, and to share tips on prevention. Available for Interview:• Ash Tewari, MBBS, MCh, Kyung Hyun Kim, MD Chair in Urology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Chairman, Milton and Carroll Petrie Department of Urology at the Mount Sinai Hospital, is a leader in robotic prostate surgery and has performed more than 5,500 robotic prostatectomies. His novel approach (called ART™) uses diagnostic imaging during robotic surgery to spare crucial nerves, preventing incontinence and impotence after surgery.. “Some men do not need to be treated,” said Dr. Tewari. “For example, many older men with health issues or men with early-stage tumors that are so small and slow-growing should be carefully watched or what we call ‘active surveillance’. This strategy requires advanced diagnostics like MRI Fusion biopsy, which was first offered at Mount Sinai and is the most precise diagnostic tool.”• Leslie Schlachter, Senior Physician Assistant, Director of the Men’s Health Program at Mount Sinai Health System, focuses on early detection of prostate cancer. A key goal of the program is maintenance of whole body health through lifestyle management to catch early and prevent diseases that impact men disproportionately. “This strategy is designed specifically for men aged 50 and over, a group traditionally difficult to get in the door to seek care,” Dr. Schlachter said.

• Jillian L. Capodice, MS, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, Icahn School of, offers a holistic approach to prostate cancer treatment. “Traditional Chinese medicine including acupuncture, Chinese herbology and qi gong are promising treatments for common prostate-related health conditions including symptoms like chronic prostatitis and benign prostatic hyperplasia, as well as supportive care for prostate cancer,” says Capodice.

Tips for Prostate Cancer Prevention:• Age is the strongest risk factor: Almost two-thirds of prostate cancers are found in men over the age of 65.• Family history can be important: Having a father or brother with prostate cancer more than doubles a man's risk.• Race is a factor: Prostate cancer occurs more often in African-American men.• Follow a healthy diet: Eat more low-fat, high-fiber foods such as fruits and vegetables; limit intake of red or processed meat.• Diagnosing cancer early: Speak with your physician about your risk for prostate cancer and the benefits of screening. For men at high risk, screening should be considered at 40. • Screening rests: Screenings consists of a PSA blood test which measures the level of PSA, a protein that is produced by the prostate gland and a digital rectal exam (DRE), which can uncover physical abnormalities of the prostate that may be a sign of cancer. New Advancements in Treatment and Detection:Fusion biopsy combines MRI images with real time ultrasound images so physicians can precisely track, target, and sample the prostate tissue that appears to be suspicious. Using fusion biopsies often means that patients will undergo fewer biopsies due to their precise nature, and treatment will focus on the diseased portion of the prostate.

‘Boot Camp’ Regimen Boosts Prostate Cancer Results:Better health leads to better surgical outcomes according to the team at Mount Sinai. Studies have shown that a decrease in abdominal fat translates to better healing and outcomes after prostate cancer surgery. The Boot Camp program combines movement/fitness to get men in the best shape physically and mentally before surgery along with constant hydration after surgery to get the prostate in gear. For men with low grade/low volume prostates which requiring active surveillance, the Men’s Health Program’s wellness approach keeps developing cancer at bay and treating only when necessary.

Community Events: Push Up Challenge & Free Prostate Cancer Risk Screening – September 16, 10:00 am to 2:30 pm, Guggenheim Pavilion (1468 Madison Avenue at 100th Street)Take the Prostate Cancer Push Up Challenge, sponsored by Mount Sinai’s Department of Urology, to encourage men and the women who love them to be fit and active. Dennis S. Charney, MD, Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz Dean, Icahn School of Medicine and President for Academic Affairs, Mount Sinai Health System, will kick off the Challenge at 1:15 pm to raise awareness of the importance of exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle. Men and women are invited to take a turn on the push-up mat and try to “Beat the Dean.” Physicians and staff will be on hand to answer questions about prostate cancer and men’s health and provide free prostate cancer risk screening to the general public.

About the Mount Sinai Health System
The Mount Sinai Health System is an integrated health system committed to providing distinguished care, conducting transformative research, and advancing biomedical education. Structured around seven hospital campuses and a single medical school, the Health System has an extensive ambulatory network and a range of inpatient and outpatient services—from community-based facilities to tertiary and quaternary care.

The System includes approximately 6,100 primary and specialty care physicians; 12 minority-owned free-standing ambulatory surgery centers; more than 140 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the renowned Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the highest in the nation in National Institutes of Health funding per investigator. Seven departments at The Mount Sinai Hospital and one at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary (NYEE) ranked nationally in the top 25 in the 2015-2016 “Best Hospitals” issue of U.S. News & World Report. Mount Sinai’s Kravis Children’s Hospital also is ranked in seven out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News & World Report.

For more information, visit http://www.mountsinaihealth.org/ or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

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