Newswise: ACSM Announces 2024 Certified Professional of the Year
Release date: 23-Feb-2024 2:05 PM EST
ACSM Announces 2024 Certified Professional of the Year
American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)

Brian Cleven, M.S., ACSM-CEP, LAT has been named the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Certified Professional of the Year for 2024. Cleven received the award today during the 2024 IDEA & ACSM Health & Fitness Summit in Chicago, IL.

Newswise: Political expert on what the GOP South Carolina primary means for Nikki Haley, Donald Trump
Release date: 23-Feb-2024 2:05 PM EST
Political expert on what the GOP South Carolina primary means for Nikki Haley, Donald Trump
Virginia Tech

The Republican race for a candidate to take on President Joe Biden in November’s election continues to be a two-person show, with Saturday’s South Carolina primary the latest stage. Virginia Tech political expert Caitlin Jewitt answers questions about the shape of the race through the South Carolina primary, the Super Tuesday contest on March 5, and beyond.

Newswise: Global warming increases the diversity of active soil bacteria
Released: 23-Feb-2024 2:00 PM EST
Global warming increases the diversity of active soil bacteria
University of Vienna

Warmer soils harbour a greater diversity of active microbes, according to a new study from researchers at the Centre for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science (CeMESS) at the University of Vienna. The study, published in Science Advances, represents a significant shift in our understanding of how microbial activity in the soil influences the global carbon cycle and possible feedback mechanisms on the climate. Until now, scientists have assumed that higher soil temperatures accelerate the growth of microbes, thus increasing the release of carbon into the atmosphere. However, this increased release of carbon is actually caused by the activation of previously dormant bacteria.

Newswise: 20240221-JorgeFresneda-013-Edit.jpg?itok=FqyvQ0hC
Released: 23-Feb-2024 1:05 PM EST
NJIT Marketing Experts Measure Brain Waves and Skin Current to Predict Emotions
New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT)

Machines still can’t think, but now they can validate your feelings, based on new research from New Jersey Institute of Technology Assistant Professor Jorge Fresneda.

   
Release date: 23-Feb-2024 1:05 PM EST
Researchers identify new choice of therapy for rare autoimmune disease EGPA
McMaster University

An international team, including researchers from McMaster University and St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, has identified a new therapeutic for patients with a rare autoimmune disease called eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA). A biologic drug called benralizumab has been shown to be non-inferior to mepolizumab in the treatment of EGPA.

Newswise: 'Invaluable' program gives respite to parents of children with special needs
Release date: 23-Feb-2024 1:05 PM EST
'Invaluable' program gives respite to parents of children with special needs
University of Rhode Island

The program, organized by URI College of Nursing Professor Chris McGrane, provides respite care for parents of children with special needs, at no cost to them. For four hours every Saturday afternoon, McGrane and her team of URI students, take care of children with special needs, giving parents a chance to take a break from the sometimes daunting responsibilities of care.

Release date: 23-Feb-2024 1:00 PM EST
African American patients on Medicaid are less likely to undergo surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

African American patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) are less likely to receive surgical treatment, reports the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: Helping stroke survivors bounce back
Release date: 23-Feb-2024 12:05 PM EST
Helping stroke survivors bounce back
Northern Arizona University

Nearly 800,000 Americans suffer a stroke every year, and most end up with some level of permanent motor disability. One researcher at Northern Arizona University is developing a device that could help healthcare providers personalize care for stroke survivors—and improve their chances of full recovery.

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This news release is embargoed until 29-Feb-2024 2:05 PM EST Released to reporters: 23-Feb-2024 12:05 PM EST

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Newswise:Video Embedded raising-the-bar-for-medical-ai
VIDEO
Release date: 23-Feb-2024 12:05 PM EST
Raising the Bar for Medical AI
Harvard Medical School

From the invention of the wheel to the advent of the printing press to the splitting of the atom, history is replete with cautionary tales of new technologies emerging before humanity was ready to cope with them.

Release date: 23-Feb-2024 12:00 PM EST
Higher body mass index linked to complications after autologous breast reconstruction
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

For women undergoing autologous breast reconstruction – reconstruction using the patient's own tissues, rather than implants – the risks of overall and specific complications are increased at higher body mass index (BMI) levels, reports the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: Researchers makes promising discoveries on role of vitamin B6 in pancreatic cancer
Released: 23-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
Researchers makes promising discoveries on role of vitamin B6 in pancreatic cancer
University of Oklahoma

Vitamin B6 is beneficial in many ways, notably for its role in maintaining a strong immune system.

Release date: 23-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
Penn Medicine researchers receive $2.1 million grant to fund long COVID research
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine has received a $2.1M grant from PolyBio Research Foundation to expand long COVID research. The grant, issued via PolyBio’s Long COVID Research Consortium (LCRC), will support studies to characterize mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 persistence in the gut, including determining the impact of viral reservoirs on gut microbiome ecosystems.

Newswise: An increase in blood-sucking black flies is expected in Germany
Released: 23-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
An increase in blood-sucking black flies is expected in Germany
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

Only six millimeters in length, black flies (Simuliidae) may look harmless like house flies, but their bites can be very unpleasant.

   
Newswise: No More Weighting
Release date: 23-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
No More Weighting
University of Northern Colorado

Alumna and professional weightlifter pursues her second Olympic games

Released: 23-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
Lab-spun sponges form perfect scaffolds for growing skin cells to heal wounds
University of Surrey

A new technique for electrospinning sponges has allowed scientists from the University of Surrey to directly produce 3D scaffolds – on which skin grafts could be grown from the patient’s own skin.

Newswise: AI and the spread of fake news sites: experts explain how to counteract them
Release date: 23-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
AI and the spread of fake news sites: experts explain how to counteract them
Virginia Tech

With national elections looming in the United States, concerns about misinformation are sharper than ever, and advances in artificial intelligence have made distinguishing genuine news sites from fake ones even more challenging. Virginia Tech experts explore three different facets of the AI-fueled spread of fake news sites and the efforts to combat them.

Released: 23-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
Genes affect your blood pressure from early childhood
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Certain genes associated with hypertension affect blood pressure from early in life, and they increase the risk of cardiovascular disease as you get older. However, you can do something about it.

Released: 23-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
Hearing relaxing words in your sleep slows your heart down
University of Liege

This discovery by researchers from the GIGA - Center of Research Cyclotron at ULiège reveals that the sleeping body also reacts to the external world during sleep, explaining how some information from the sensory environment can affect sleep quality.

Newswise: Neurobiology: How bats distinguish different sounds
Released: 23-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
Neurobiology: How bats distinguish different sounds
Goethe University Frankfurt

Seba’s short-tailed bat (Carollia perspicillata) lives in the subtropical and tropical forests of Central and South America, where it mostly feeds on pepper fruit

Newswise: Giant inflatable colon comes to UCLA to help raise awareness on rising number of people being diagnosed with colorectal cancer
Release date: 23-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
Giant inflatable colon comes to UCLA to help raise awareness on rising number of people being diagnosed with colorectal cancer
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

For Colon Cancer Awareness Month, experts from the UCLA Health will educate members of the community on the importance of starting colorectal cancer screening early and continuing to have it done regularly throughout their lives to prevent the development of cancer.

Release date: 23-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
School focus on grades, test scores linked to violence against teachers
Ohio State University

Violence against teachers is likely to be higher in schools that focus on grades and test scores than in schools that emphasize student learning, a new study has found.

Newswise: Audiology Student Researches Security Vulnerabilities in Hearing Aids
Release date: 23-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
Audiology Student Researches Security Vulnerabilities in Hearing Aids
University of Northern Colorado

Student combines her fascination with technology and research to uncover whether hearing aids that use Bluetooth technology can be hacked

Released: 23-Feb-2024 11:05 AM EST
Having a ‘regular doctor’ can significantly reduce GP workload, study finds
University of Cambridge

If all GP practices moved to a model where patients saw the same doctor at each visit, it could significantly reduce doctor workload while improving patient health, a study suggests.

Release date: 23-Feb-2024 10:05 AM EST
Super Strong Magnetic Fields Leave Imprint on Nuclear Matter
Brookhaven National Laboratory

A new analysis by the STAR collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), a particle collider at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory, provides the first direct evidence of the imprint left by what may be the universe’s most powerful magnetic fields on “deconfined” nuclear matter. The evidence comes from measuring the way differently charged particles separate when emerging from collisions of atomic nuclei at this DOE Office of Science user facility.

Newswise: Wistar Scientists Discover Link Between Leaky Gut and 
Accelerated Biological Aging
Release date: 23-Feb-2024 10:05 AM EST
Wistar Scientists Discover Link Between Leaky Gut and Accelerated Biological Aging
Wistar Institute

Wistar Institute’s Dr. Mohamed Abdel-Mohsen has demonstrated a connection between viral damage to the gut and premature biological aging.

Newswise: Off-the-shelf vaccine offers hope for pancreatic and colorectal cancer patients with KRAS mutations
Release date: 23-Feb-2024 10:05 AM EST
Off-the-shelf vaccine offers hope for pancreatic and colorectal cancer patients with KRAS mutations
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Samara Rahman, 74, enrolled in a clinical trial at UCLA Health that was evaluating an “off-the-shelf” vaccine that is given after surgery to prevent or delay the cancer from coming back in high-risk patients.

Newswise: Biomolecular condensates – regulatory hubs for plant iron supply
Released: 23-Feb-2024 10:05 AM EST
Biomolecular condensates – regulatory hubs for plant iron supply
Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf

Iron is a micronutrient for plants. Biologists from the Institute of Botany at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) describe in a study, which has now been published in the Journal of Cell Biology, that regulatory proteins for iron uptake behave particularly dynamically in the cell nucleus when the cells are exposed to blue light – an important signal for plant growth.

Newswise: Barriers against Antarctic ice melt disappearing at the double
Released: 23-Feb-2024 10:05 AM EST
Barriers against Antarctic ice melt disappearing at the double
University of Edinburgh

Undersea anchors of ice that help prevent Antarctica’s land ice from slipping into the ocean are shrinking at more than twice the rate compared with 50 years ago, research shows.

Newswise: How discrimination, class, and gender intersect to affect Black Americans’ well-being
Release date: 23-Feb-2024 10:05 AM EST
How discrimination, class, and gender intersect to affect Black Americans’ well-being
College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Black Americans experience racial discrimination as a chronic stressor that influences their quality of life. But it exists in conjunction with other social factors that may modify the impact in various ways. A new study from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign explores how discrimination, gender, and social class affect individual well-being and relationship quality for Black Americans.

Newswise: UT Southwestern study shows glucagon is key for kidney health
Release date: 23-Feb-2024 10:05 AM EST
UT Southwestern study shows glucagon is key for kidney health
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Glucagon, a hormone best known for promoting blood sugar production in the liver, also appears to play a key role in maintaining kidney health. When UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers removed receptors for this hormone from mouse kidneys, the animals developed symptoms akin to chronic kidney disease (CKD).

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This news release is embargoed until 28-Feb-2024 8:00 AM EST Released to reporters: 23-Feb-2024 9:15 AM EST

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Newswise: U.S. Department of Energy awards Argonne National Laboratory $4 million for energy-efficient microchip research
Release date: 23-Feb-2024 9:05 AM EST
U.S. Department of Energy awards Argonne National Laboratory $4 million for energy-efficient microchip research
Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne awarded $4 million to research new materials to develop energy-efficient microchips.

Released: 23-Feb-2024 9:05 AM EST
Hackensack Meridian Health, Part of Select Parkinson’s Foundation Study Group, Implementing Changes to Better Care for Patients
Hackensack Meridian Health

Partnership with Parkinson's Foundation to write protocols for patients hospitalized with Parkinson's Disease to receive the best care.

Newswise: Artifact could be linked to Spanish explorer Coronado's expedition across Texas Panhandle
Released: 23-Feb-2024 8:00 AM EST
Artifact could be linked to Spanish explorer Coronado's expedition across Texas Panhandle
Southern Methodist University

It’s a small piece of obsidian, just over 5 centimeters long, likely found on a hard-scrabble piece of ranchland in the Texas panhandle. But when SMU anthropologist Matthew Boulanger looks at it, he gets a mental image of Spanish explorer Francisco Vasquez de Coronado making his way across the plains more than 470 years ago in search of a fabled city of gold.

Newswise: Early-Life Airborne Lead Exposure Associated with Lower IQ and Self-Control in NIH Study
Released: 23-Feb-2024 7:05 AM EST
Early-Life Airborne Lead Exposure Associated with Lower IQ and Self-Control in NIH Study
Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes NIH

Children who lived in areas with higher levels of airborne lead in their first five years of life appeared to have slightly lower IQs and less self-control, with boys showing more sensitivity to lead exposure, according to a new study from the NIH Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) Program.

   
Newswise: The 2024 Cardiac Rehab Persons of the Year Awards
Released: 22-Feb-2024 10:05 PM EST
The 2024 Cardiac Rehab Persons of the Year Awards
Hackensack Meridian Health

Hackensack University Medical Center Presents 22nd Annual Cardiac Rehabilitation Persons of the Year Awards

Newswise: Three years later, search for life on Mars continues
Released: 22-Feb-2024 9:05 PM EST
Three years later, search for life on Mars continues
University of Cincinnati

In the three years since NASA’s Perseverance rover touched down on Mars, the NASA science team has made the daily task of investigating the red planet seem almost mundane.

Newswise: Chronic stress spreads cancer … here’s how
Released: 22-Feb-2024 8:05 PM EST
Chronic stress spreads cancer … here’s how
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Stress is inevitable. But too much of it can be terrible for our health. Chronic stress can increase our risk for heart disease and strokes. It may also help cancer spread. How this works has remained a mystery—a challenge for cancer care.

Newswise: Researchers harness 2D magnetic materials for energy-efficient computing
Released: 22-Feb-2024 8:05 PM EST
Researchers harness 2D magnetic materials for energy-efficient computing
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Experimental computer memories and processors built from magnetic materials use far less energy than traditional silicon-based devices.

Newswise: Scientists can tell where a mouse is looking and located based on its neural activity
Released: 22-Feb-2024 8:05 PM EST
Scientists can tell where a mouse is looking and located based on its neural activity
Cell Press

Researchers have paired a deep learning model with experimental data to “decode” mouse neural activity.

Newswise: ‘Dynamic duo’ defenses in bacteria ward off viral threats
Released: 22-Feb-2024 8:05 PM EST
‘Dynamic duo’ defenses in bacteria ward off viral threats
University of Southampton

Scientists at the University of Southampton have discovered that bacteria can pair up their defense systems to create a formidable force, greater than the sum of its parts, to fight off attack from phage viruses.

Released: 22-Feb-2024 8:05 PM EST
A third of trans masculine individuals on testosterone ovulate
Amsterdam UMC

"Trans masculine people are people born female but do not identify as such, for example they feel male, gender fluid or non-binary. Our examination of their ovarian tissue shows that 33% of them show signs of recent ovulation, despite being on testosterone and no longer menstruating," says Joyce Asseler, PhD candidate at Amsterdam UMC.

Newswise: Research Study on Novel Rehab Program for Heart Failure Patients, Led by Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Expands to Advocate Health Site in Chicago
Released: 22-Feb-2024 7:05 PM EST
Research Study on Novel Rehab Program for Heart Failure Patients, Led by Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Expands to Advocate Health Site in Chicago
Wake Forest University School of Medicine

Wake Forest University School of Medicine, the academic core of Advocate Health, is expanding another research study to Advocate Christ Medical Center, in Oak Lawn, Illinois, just outside Chicago. The study, which is testing a novel rehabilitation program designed for older patients hospitalized with acute heart failure, is funded by a five-year, $30 million grant, awarded to Wake Forest University School of Medicine in 2022 by the National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health.


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