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  • newswise-fullscreen Today's gifts from the 1969 moon walk

    Credit: NASA/SOPHIA

    Jean Creighton, right, monitors science information presented on the EPO console aboard the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOPHIA) while flying at 43,000 feet.

  • newswise-fullscreen Today's gifts from the 1969 moon walk

    Credit: University of Wisconsin System

    Jean Creighton

For the 50th anniversary of the first American moon walk, Jean Creighton can discuss the 1969 lunar landing and trace the contributions that went into that achievement to technological breakthroughs that have transformed our everyday lives.

Creighton, an avid space science communicator, has taught astrophysics at UWM since 1999, and became director of the UWM Manfred Olson Planetarium in 2007. In 2014, she was chosen by NASA to be one of the 24 Airborne Astronomy Ambassadors to fly on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). SOPHIA is a Boeing 747SP aircraft modified to carry a 2.7-meter reflecting telescope. Flying at altitudes above 99 percent of Earth’s infrared-blocking atmosphere, allows for better views of the cosmos than can be obtained by telescopes on Earth. 

Creighton grew up in Greece and earned her doctorate in astrophysics from the University of Waterloo in Canada. See her profile at: https://uwm.edu/planetarium/director-jean-creighton/

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