ALBANY, N.Y. (Aug. 4, 2022) — After an active 2021 Atlantic hurricane season, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicted an “above-average” 2022 Atlantic hurricane season, with 14 to 21 named storms, including three to six major hurricanes. 

Two months into the 2022 season, however, just three tropical storms have formed so far in the Atlantic basin. This marks the first time since 2017 that a hurricane has not developed in the Atlantic by Aug. 1.  

Despite the slow start, experts, including those at the University at Albany, caution not to be lulled into a false sense of security.

According to Brian Tang, an associate professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences at UAlbany, dry, sinking air in the tropical Atlantic has not been conducive for thunderstorm clusters to form into hurricanes.

He still expects this hurricane season to be a busy one. 

“Typically, the Atlantic hurricane season does not get going in earnest until around now. August, September, and October are usually the busiest months of the hurricane season. One long-range outlook indicates that hurricane activity might start picking up toward the middle part of this month, so that would be right on cue,” Tang said. 

“The switch can flip in a hurry once that dry, sinking air goes away, and conditions get more conducive for hurricane formation.” 

Kristen Corbosiero, an associate professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, agrees that the large-scale factors are still in place for an active peak season over the next month. 

“The dry, dusty air over the Atlantic has really squashed any disturbances coming off of Africa thus far. But things can change quickly, so stay tuned and be prepared.”

Corbosiero and Tang are available to offer insight on this year’s Atlantic hurricane season via phone or live/recorded interviews. UAlbany also has an on-campus television studio available for satellite interviews.  

 

About the University at Albany: 

A comprehensive public research university, the University at Albany-SUNY offers more than 120 undergraduate majors and minors and 125 master’s, doctoral and graduate certificate programs. UAlbany is a leader among all New York State colleges and universities in such diverse fields as atmospheric and environmental sciences, business, education, public health, health sciences, criminal justice, emergency preparedness, engineering and applied sciences, informatics, public administration, social welfare and sociology, taught by an extensive roster of faculty experts. It also offers expanded academic and research opportunities for students through an affiliation with Albany Law School. With a curriculum enhanced by 600 study-abroad opportunities, UAlbany launches great career 

 

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