UT Southwestern has these sources for your reporting on the Chinese coronavirus


Expert Pitch

UT Southwestern has these sources for your reporting on the Chinese coronavirus. Please let us know if you would like to set up an interview: (214) 648-3404.

Trish Perl, M.D., Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases. Dr. Perl was co-author of a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine on a respiratory coronavirus outbreak in the Middle East and has long had an interest in the subject. Hospital outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

Assiri A, McGeer A, Perl TM, Price CS, Al Rabeeah AA, Cummings DA, Alabdullatif ZN, Assad M, Almulhim A, Makhdoom H, Madani H, Alhakeem R, Al-Tawfiq JA, Cotten M, Watson SJ, Kellam P, Zumla AI, Memish ZA N. Engl. J. Med. 2013 Aug 369 5 407-16

Jeffrey Kahn, M.D., Ph.D., Chief, Division of Pediatric Infectious Disease at UT Southwestern, leads research on human respiratory viruses, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and newly emerging human viruses. His laboratory was the first or among the first laboratories in the United States to describe the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of several newly identified viruses including human metapneumovirus, coronaviruses NL63 and HKU1, human bocavirus and polyomavirus WUV.

Dr. Kahn is the Director of the Pediatric Infectious Disease and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program at UT Southwestern Medical Center and the Director of Infectious Diseases at Children’s Medical Center. Dr. Kahn is also the Medical Director of Research at Children’s Medical Center.

For a basic science perspective:

John Schoggins, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Microbiology,  has long been interested in why bats can harbor numerous viruses without becoming sick. In 2014, the National Institutes of Health selected him for a New Innovator Award for that research, which began under UT Southwestern’s High Risk/High Impact grants program. The work could have implications for the deadly viruses that cause Ebola and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS).

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