"They have been seared into my memory." Research by Rutgers psychologist Tracey Shors addresses Christine Blasey Ford's testimony detailing alleged sexual assault by Brett Kavanaugh

Article ID: 701263

Released: 27-Sep-2018 2:05 PM EDT

Source Newsroom: Rutgers University

  • Credit: Shutterstock

Newswise — Christine Blasey Ford told the Senate Judiciary Committee today that she "will never forget" the key details of her alleged assault by Brett Kavanaugh, because "they have been seared into my memory."

Her testimony echos research by Rutgers psychologist Tracey Shors, whose recent study found women who are sexually assaulted experience more vivid memories than women coping with the aftermath of other traumatic, life-altering events not associated with sexual violence.

“Each time you reflect on an old memory, you make a new one in your brain because it is retrieved in the present space and time,’’ said Shors, who co-authored the study published in Frontiers in Neuroscience. “What this study shows is that this process can make it even more difficult to forget what happened.”

It explains why Blasey Ford may have difficulty remembering certain details leading up to the party in question, but how she testified that she is "100 percent certain" that Kavanaugh assaulted her as a teen.

To speak with Shors about her research and how it relates to Blasey Ford's accusations against Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh, please contact Lisa Intrabartola, lisa.intrabartola@ucm.rutgers.edu, 848.932.0554. 

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