Researchers Develop Personalized Medicine Tool for Inherited Colorectal Cancer Syndrome Risk

Article ID: 705178

Released: 10-Dec-2018 12:00 PM EST

Source Newsroom: Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah

  • facebook-share-Researchers Develop Personalized Medicine Tool for 
Inherited Colorectal Cancer Syndrome Risk
  • twitter-share-Researchers Develop Personalized Medicine Tool for 
Inherited Colorectal Cancer Syndrome Risk
  • mail-share-Researchers Develop Personalized Medicine Tool for 
Inherited Colorectal Cancer Syndrome Risk
  • compact-share-Researchers Develop Personalized Medicine Tool for 
Inherited Colorectal Cancer Syndrome Risk
  • Share
  • Print-friendly Layout

Newswise — SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH, USA and LEIDEN, THE NETHERLANDS – An international team of researchers led by Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) has developed, calibrated, and validated a novel tool for identifying the genetic changes in Lynch syndrome genes that are likely to be responsible for causing symptoms of the disease. The results were published this week in the journal Genetics in Medicine.

Lynch syndrome is a hereditary condition that results in higher rates of colon, endometrial, and other cancers. If unmanaged, individuals with Lynch syndrome have a 75 percent lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer. It is believed that approximately five percent of all colorectal cancer cases are associated with this syndrome.

Millions of distinct changes are possible in genes that control health, and it is a massive undertaking to identify which specific changes are associated with developing disease. Some genetic changes are believed to have no impact at all, while others carry significant risk. Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute work to understand and classify which gene changes are likeliest to cause disease, as well as to identify appropriate strategies to help manage disease risk.

This groundbreaking study was led by Sean Tavtigian, PhD, a cancer researcher at HCI and professor of oncological sciences at the U of U. The work was built on a decade-long international collaboration. “Correctly identifying which of the genetic changes we observe actually result in disease is fundamentally important in clinical care,” said Tavtigian. “Having clarity on this issue has the potential to add years to patients’ lives, reduce anxiety about disease risk, and use health care dollars more efficiently.”

The team used a laboratory test previously developed by the group of Niels de Wind, PhD, associate professor of human genetics at the Leiden University Medical Center in The Netherlands, to characterize genetic changes associated with disease risk. The lab test, called the Cell-free in vitro MMR Activity (CIMRA) assay, improves classification of variants of uncertain significance in Lynch syndrome. “The test is rapid and accurate,” said de Wind. In the current study, the test was thoroughly calibrated and validated, such that its results could now be integrated with computer-based modeling and clinical data. As a result, this study provides an analytical tool suitable for clinical use to assess the potential of changes in Lynch syndrome genes to cause disease.

“A key point is that we believe the accuracy of the tool combining the CIMRA test with the previously published computational analysis to be about 97 percent, making it appropriate for clinical use,” said Tavtigian. de Wind added that the work "represents a new pinnacle in the classification of genetic variation."

The authors believe that routine utilization of their methods will dramatically increase the rate of risk classification for genetic changes that previously were poorly understood. Moreover, this calibration strategy provides a template for the development, validation, and calibration of reliable strategies for the diagnostic assessment of other hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes and genetic disorders.  

This international collaboration was led by HCI, along with colleagues at U of Vermont (Marc S. Greenblatt, MD), Europe, and Australia. The University of Utah contribution of this study was funded by the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute P30 CA042014, R01 CA164944, R01 CA121245, and the Huntsman Cancer Foundation. In addition, Niels de Wind has received funding from the Dutch Digestive Foundation, grant FP 16-012. Genetics in Medicine is the official peer-reviewed journal of the American College of Genetics and Genomics.

###

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah is the official cancer center of Utah. The cancer campus includes a state-of-the-art cancer specialty hospital as well as two buildings dedicated to cancer research. HCI treats patients with all forms of cancer and is recognized among the best cancer hospitals in the country by U.S. News and World Report. As the only National Cancer Institute (NCI)-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center in the Mountain West, HCI serves the largest geographic region in the country, drawing patients from Utah, Nevada, Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana. More genes for inherited cancers have been discovered at HCI than at any other cancer center in the world, including genes responsible for hereditary breast, ovarian, colon, head, and neck cancers, along with melanoma. HCI manages the Utah Population Database, the largest genetic database in the world, with information on more than 11 million people linked to genealogies, health records, and vital statistics. HCI was founded by Jon M. and Karen Huntsman

Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC) is a modern university medical center for research, education and patient care with a high quality clinical profile and a strong scientific orientation. Its unique research practice, ranging from pure fundamental medical research to applied clinical research, places LUMC among the world top. LUMC acts as a knowledge center for topics in the field of public health with an impact on society. As an innovator the LUMC stands for improving healthcare and people’s health.

SEE ORIGINAL STUDY

  • share-facebook-Researchers Develop Personalized Medicine Tool for 
Inherited Colorectal Cancer Syndrome Risk
  • share-twitter-Researchers Develop Personalized Medicine Tool for 
Inherited Colorectal Cancer Syndrome Risk

Comment/Share

step 2
Chat now!