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Newswise: Strongest Arctic cyclone on record led to surprising loss of sea ice
Released: 29-Nov-2022 3:25 PM EST
Strongest Arctic cyclone on record led to surprising loss of sea ice
University of Washington

The strongest Arctic cyclone ever observed struck in January 2022. A new analysis shows that while forecasts accurately predicted the massive storm, models seriously underestimated its impact on sea ice. Results suggest places to improve forecast models in a changing Arctic Ocean.

Released: 29-Nov-2022 1:25 PM EST
The evolution of Asia’s mammals was dictated by ancient climate change and rising mountains
Field Museum

The idea that climate change and geological events can shape evolution isn’t a new one: anyone who’s heard of dinosaurs knows that a big change in the environment (like, say, a meteor hitting the Earth 66 million years ago and causing a chain reaction of storms, earthquakes, cold, and darkness) can dictate how animals live, die, and evolve.

Newswise: UNC’s Entrepreneurial Challenge Helps Student Back Eco-Friendly Fashion in Thrifty Way
Released: 29-Nov-2022 12:15 PM EST
UNC’s Entrepreneurial Challenge Helps Student Back Eco-Friendly Fashion in Thrifty Way
University of Northern Colorado

Kennedy Dechant, a sophomore Environmental and Sustainability Studies major at the University of Northern Colorado, never imagined that she would one day be running her own business. Now the owner of the online thrift store, Eclecticism, her business began as a website she created for her web design class in high school.

Newswise: To Battle Climate Change, Scientists Tap Into Carbon-Hungry Microorganisms for Clues
Released: 29-Nov-2022 10:00 AM EST
To Battle Climate Change, Scientists Tap Into Carbon-Hungry Microorganisms for Clues
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Berkeley Lab scientists have demonstrated a new technique, modeled after a metabolic process found in some bacteria, to convert carbon dioxide into solar fuels through artificial photosynthesis.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 8:10 PM EST
Media Availability: UNH British Historian to Comment on Royal Visit to Boston
University of New Hampshire

Prince William and Kate Middleton are both expected to make the trip across the pond for the second annual Earthshot Prize ceremony which will be held in Boston. Nicoletta Gullace, associate professor of history at the University of New Hampshire, and an expert on the royal family, is available to talk about the significance of the trip and what this means for the monarchy as well as for the city of Boston.

Newswise: Climate and biodiversity matter to how drylands fare under higher grazing pressure
Released: 28-Nov-2022 4:35 PM EST
Climate and biodiversity matter to how drylands fare under higher grazing pressure
Northern Arizona University

A recent study co-authored by associate professor Matthew Bowker found important connections between grazing pressure on drylands and the ecosystem services they provide. 

Newswise: Rethinking Winter Carbon Cycling
Released: 28-Nov-2022 3:05 PM EST
Rethinking Winter Carbon Cycling
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Northern peatlands contain one third of the Earth’s soil carbon, making them important for carbon storage. In northern peatlands, carbon losses from soil during the winter can exceed carbon storage during the warm growing season, primarily because of the activity of microbes. To better understand how microbes interact in peatland soils during the winter months, this study incubated Arctic peat soils under winter conditions, then analyzed the microbes to understand how the microbes released carbon dioxide.

Released: 28-Nov-2022 1:35 PM EST
What Ancient Underwater Food Webs Can Tell Us About the Future of Climate Change
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

UNLV analysis challenges the idea that ocean ecosystems have barely changed over millions of years, pointing scientists down a new path on conservation efforts and policy.

Newswise: Calcifying organisms, under threat from a combination of ocean warming and acidification
Released: 28-Nov-2022 1:10 PM EST
Calcifying organisms, under threat from a combination of ocean warming and acidification
Instituto de Ciencias del Mar (ICM) - CSIC

A new study led by the Institut de Ciències del Mar (ICM-CSIC), with colleagues from the British Antarctic Survey, the Institute of Oceanology, the Polish Academy of Sciences and the University of Gdańsk have also participated has revealed that global warming and ocean acidification threaten marine organisms that build their skeletons and shells with calcium carbonate (chalk) such as corals, bryozoans, molluscs, sea urchins or crustaceans.

Newswise: Earth’s many new lakes
Released: 28-Nov-2022 11:40 AM EST
Earth’s many new lakes
University of Copenhagen

The number of lakes on our planet has increased substantially in recent decades, according to a unique global survey of 3.4 million lakes that the University of Copenhagen has taken part in.

Newswise: When cyclones and fires collide…
Released: 27-Nov-2022 8:05 PM EST
When cyclones and fires collide…
University of South Australia

As strong winds and torrential rains inundate Australia’s south-eastern coast, new research suggests that high intensity bushfires might not be too far behind, with their dual effects extending damage zones and encroaching on previously low-risk residential areas.

Newswise: For Grassland Soil Viruses, Precipitation Shapes Diversity, Abundance, and Function
Released: 23-Nov-2022 7:05 AM EST
For Grassland Soil Viruses, Precipitation Shapes Diversity, Abundance, and Function
Department of Energy, Office of Science

As precipitation patterns shift in response to climate change, scientists must understand how this change affects soil viruses. In this study, scientists analyzed DNA viruses in three grassland soils with different historical precipitation patterns: low precipitation from eastern Washington, intermediate precipitation from Kansas, and high precipitation from Iowa. The researchers found that viruses were more diverse and more common in drier soil.

Released: 22-Nov-2022 7:15 PM EST
Scientists say chemicals could undercut global plastics treaty
Green Science Policy Institute

Next week the United Nations intergovernmental negotiating committee to develop an international legally binding instrument on plastic pollution will meet in Uruguay.

Newswise: Large parts of Europe are warming twice as fast as the planet on average
Released: 22-Nov-2022 7:00 PM EST
Large parts of Europe are warming twice as fast as the planet on average
Stockholm University

The warming during the summer months in Europe has been much faster than the global average, shows a new study by researchers at Stockholm University published in the Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres.

Newswise: Earth might be experiencing 7th mass extinction, not 6th
Released: 22-Nov-2022 12:20 PM EST
Earth might be experiencing 7th mass extinction, not 6th
University of California, Riverside

Earth is currently in the midst of a mass extinction, losing thousands of species each year. New research suggests environmental changes caused the first such event in history, which occurred millions of years earlier than scientists previously realized.

Newswise: Tibetan bottom ice might be younger than previously believed by two orders of magnitude
Released: 22-Nov-2022 11:55 AM EST
Tibetan bottom ice might be younger than previously believed by two orders of magnitude
Science China Press

From September to October of 2015, a 60-person team were gathering on the Guliya ice cap in the Kunlun Mountains of the Tibetan Plateau, with the purpose to retrieve the world’s oldest ice.

Newswise: Limiting Global Warming Now Can Preserve Valuable Freshwater Resource
Released: 22-Nov-2022 10:00 AM EST
Limiting Global Warming Now Can Preserve Valuable Freshwater Resource
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Researchers say that the Chilean Andes could face marked snow loss and roughly 10% less mountain water runoff with a global warming of approximately 2.5 degrees Celsius over the next 30 years. The study has implications for the California Sierra Nevada and highlights the need for carbon mitigation.

Released: 22-Nov-2022 8:50 AM EST
Three days to help save our coastal habitats
University of Portsmouth

A global gathering of marine scientists has set a three-day symposium to work out how we can maximise the many life and planet protecting services we as humans benefit from our coastal habitats.

17-Nov-2022 7:05 AM EST
Physicians urged to consider fungal infections as possible cause for lung inflammation
UC Davis Health

UC Davis Health infectious diseases expert George Thompson warns of the rising threat and apparent spread of disease-causing fungi outside their traditional hot spots. Fungal lung infections are commonly misdiagnosed, leading to delays in treatment and increase in antimicrobial resistance in the community.

   
15-Nov-2022 2:00 PM EST
Climate change contributing to an expected rise in fungal pathogens over the next decade
American College of Physicians (ACP)

Endemic mycoses, or fungal pathogens that lead to a wide range of diseases in humans, are expected to become more common in the coming decade, partly due to climate change. The increasing spread of these pathogens increases the possibility that clinicians without familiarity of the mycoses may encounter them in daily practice. This is important because endemic mycoses may be erroneously diagnosed as bacterial infections, leading to inappropriate use of antibiotics and other prescriptions that provide no relief to the patient. The commentary is published in Annals of Internal Medicine.


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