American Thoracic Society (ATS)

ATS Announces GSK Grants to Support COVID-19 Crisis Fund’s Research and Outreach Efforts

Newswise — New York, NY – May 5, 2020 – Today, the American Thoracic Society announced that GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) has awarded the Society two grants totaling $380,000 to support the ATS COVID-19 Crisis Fund, a newly launched initiative to develop and disseminate research, education and scientific recommendations to providers in the pulmonary and critical care communities, as well as other clinicians in need of expanding their skill set during this emergency. The first grant will fund two new $50,000 grants in the ATS Research Program in COVID-19. The second grant for $280,000 will support the Society’s patient education and outreach efforts related to COVID-19.

The COVID-19 pandemic has posed significant challenges for pulmonary and critical care specialists worldwide. As a membership society of health care professionals committed to improving lung health, ATS is a leading voice in the discourse on initiatives to counter the spread of the coronavirus and provide support to those on the frontlines, who are treating patients diagnosed with COVID-19. In order to fulfill its mission to the greatest extent possible as COVID-19 ravages individuals and medical infrastructures worldwide, ATS is seeking industry support.

“GSK’s generous support comes at a critical time in the COVID-19 pandemic,” said ATS President James Beck, MD. “On behalf of the entire ATS community, I want to thank GSK for their very generous support. These funds will help support time-sensitive research and educational outreach to patients at a time when resources are so stretched. ATS values our partnership with GSK.”  

“We have a long history of working alongside the pulmonology and critical care community and, especially during this crisis, are proud to support ATS to advance critical research efforts and help educate patients who include some of the highest risk, most under-served members of our communities,” said, Karin E. Rosén, MD, PhD, senior vice president, U.S. Medical Affairs, GSK. “We are committed to contributing to the fight against COVID-19 and this is one of many actions we are taking to help find solutions and provide support to ensure patients can receive the care they need. These efforts also include programs available to help patients access medicines and vaccines, including those impacted by COVID-19.”

It is the ATS’s hope that donations to the fund will motivate other industry groups to share their resources in helping to address the significant needs arising from the COVID-19 crisis.

For more information about making a donation to the ATS COVID-19 Crisis Fund, please contact the ATS Office of Development at dev@thoracic.org.

 

Contacts for Media: Dacia Morris dmorris@thoracic.org

 

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About the American Thoracic Society

Founded in 1905, the American Thoracic Society is the world's leading medical association dedicated to advancing pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine. The Society’s more than 16,000 members prevent and fight respiratory disease around the globe through research, education, patient care and advocacy. The ATS publishes four journals, the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology,  the Annals of the American Thoracic Society and ATS Scholar.

 




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