BIDMC’s Research & Health News Digest – July 2020 Edition

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Welcome to the July 2020 Edition of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center’s (BIDMC) Research & Health News Digest. 

 

Breaking news: Single-shot COVID-19 vaccine protects non-human primates

This morning, a group of scientists, led by BIDMC’s Dan H. Barouch, MD, PhD, reported in Nature that a leading candidate COVID-19 vaccine developed at BIDMC in collaboration with Johnson & Johnson raised neutralizing antibodies and robustly protected non-human primates against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Read more, here:

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/news/2020/07/covid-19-vaccine-protects-non-human-primates

 

Additional stories in this edition include:

  • Study: Delaying surgery associated with increased risk in some gastrointestinal malignancies
  • Respirators may be disinfected up to 20 times without loss of fit or filtration
  • National survey on COVID-19 pandemic shows significant mental health impact
  • Physicians provide first comprehensive review of COVID-19’s effects beyond the lungs
  • Study finds significant decline in emergent medical, surgical and obstetric hospitalizations during early phase of COVID-19 public health emergency at BIDMC
  • Mask-related acne tips from a dermatologist
  • Study reveals increasing rates of preventable hospitalizations among older adults with dementia
  • Researchers work to better measure delirium severity in older patients
  • Researchers find end-of-life practices vary widely by region
  • Heat-related injuries and how to stay cool
  • Screening for Hepatitis C: Not just for baby boomers
  • Dealing with Crohn's Disease during pregnancy

 

Study: Delaying surgery associated with increased risk in some gastrointestinal malignancies

In a study published in the Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, a team of investigators led by Scott Fligor, MD, (General Surgery, BIDMC) examined the effects of delaying surgery for gastrointestinal cancers and found that the delays may be associated with shorter survival times.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/news/2020/07/surgical-delay

 

Respirators may be disinfected up to 20 times without loss of fit or filtration

As infection rates begin to spike in some regions around the country, a team of microbiologists led by James E. Kirby, MD, (Clinical Microbiology Laboratory, BIDMC), identified an efficient, low-cost method of disinfecting N95 respirators for re-use up to 20 times. Their findings, which could help alleviate shortages among health care providers, are published online in mBio.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/news/2020/07/respirators-disinfected

 

National survey on COVID-19 pandemic shows significant mental health impact

The findings of a nationwide survey deployed by Sarah Ballou, PhD (Gastroenterology, BIDMC) and colleagues show 90 percent of survey respondents reported experiencing emotional distress related to the pandemic.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/news/2020/07/covid-19-mental-health

 

Physicians provide first comprehensive review of COVID-19’s effects beyond the lungs

Researcher-clinicians, including Kartik Sehgal, MD, (Cancer Center, BIDMC), conducted an extensive review of the latest findings on COVID-19’s effect on organ systems outside the lungs. Their review, published in Nature Medicine, also summarized proposed mechanisms behind these wide-ranging systemic effects and provided clinical guidance for physicians.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/news/2020/07/covid-19-effects-beyond-the-lungs

 

Study finds significant decline in emergent medical, surgical and obstetric hospitalizations during early phase of COVID-19 public health emergency at BIDMC

In a study published in the Journal of General Internal MedicineTimothy Anderson, MD, (General Medicine, BIDMC) and colleagues report on the decline of emergent medical, surgical and obstetric hospitalizations at the medical center during the six-week period following the week of the declaration of the COVID-19 public health emergency in Boston in mid-March 2020.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/news/2020/07/covid-hospital-declines

 

Mask-related acne tips from a dermatologist

With the CDC’s recommendation to wear cloth face coverings in public to help reduce the spread of COVID-19, people may find themselves facing new or increased skin complaints. Rachel Reynolds, MD, (Dermatology, BIDMC) shares what concerns she is hearing most often from patients, and steps you can take to soothe your skin.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/wellness-insights/skin-health/mask-related-acne-tips-from-a-dermatologist

 

Study reveals increasing rates of preventable hospitalizations among older adults with dementia

Older adults with dementia tend to be hospitalized more often than those without cognitive impairment. Timothy Anderson, MD (Medicine, BIDMC) and colleagues have found that in recent years, increasing numbers of these hospitalizations were for conditions for which hospitalization can often be avoided with improvements in outpatient care. The findings, published in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society, point to the need for improved strategies to safeguard the health of individuals in the community who have dementia, to avoid the need for hospitalized care.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/news/2020/07/preventable-hospitalizations-senior-adults-dementia

 

Researchers work to better measure delirium severity in older patients

In a study published in the journal Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, a team of researchers led by Sarinnapha Vasunilashorn, PhD, (General Medicine, BIDMC) reported on their effort to improve and validate tools used to assess the severity of delirium. The aim was to more accurately define methods for detecting and measuring delirium symptom severity, which could in turn lead to improved prevention and treatment for patients at risk.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/news/2020/07/delirium-severity

 

Researchers find end-of-life practices vary widely by region

Researchers including Jason H. Maley, MD, (Center for Healthcare Delivery Science, BIDMC) examined regional variation in site of death for older adults with chronic diseases from 2010 to 2016. The findings — which were published in JAMA Network Open — reveal that where chronically ill patients live may be an important determinant of whether their end-of-life care takes place in the hospital, ICU or hospice.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/news/2020/07/end-of-life-practices-vary-by-region

 

Heat-related injuries and how to stay cool

It's important to know the signs of heat-related injuries and how to stay cool when the temperatures soar. Laura Burke, MD, (Emergency Medicine, BIDMC) shares the signs of heat exhaustion and how to protect yourself in high temperatures.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/wellness-insights/summer-health/2019/07/heat-related-injuries-and-how-to-stay-cool

 

Screening for hepatitis C: Not just for baby boomers

Hepatitis C is a liver disease linked to more deaths in the United States than the next reportable 60 infectious diseases combined — including HIV and tuberculosis. While screening guidelines for hepatitis C previously targeted baby boomers, experts, including Camilla Graham, MD, MPH, (Infectious Diseases, BIDMC), say more universal testing guidelines should be followed for early detection and better outcomes.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/wellness-insights/gastrointestinal-gi-health/new-universal-screening-guidelines-for-hepatitis

 

Dealing with Crohn's disease during pregnancy

Most women know it’s best to be in good physical health before getting pregnant. For women with Crohn's disease, that means more than eating right and exercising. Jacqueline Wolf, MD, (Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, BIDMC), shares what women with Crohn’s disease, and other forms of inflammatory bowel disease, should know before getting pregnant.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/wellness-insights/gastrointestinal-gi-health/2020/07/dealing-with-crohns-during-pregnancy

 

MEDIA CONTACT
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CITATIONS

Nature; Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery; mBio; Nature Medicine; Journal of General Internal Medicine; Journal of the American Geriatric Society; Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders; JAMA Network Open




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Released: 4-Aug-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Tip Sheet: COVID-19 vaccines, COVID-19 and cancer patients, smoking cessation apps, structural racism in medicine – and more
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Summaries of recent Fred Hutch research findings and other news with links for additional background and media contacts.

Newswise: Story Tips: Pandemic impact, root studies, neutrons confirm, lab on a crystal and modeling fusion
Released: 4-Aug-2020 1:25 PM EDT
Story Tips: Pandemic impact, root studies, neutrons confirm, lab on a crystal and modeling fusion
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

ORNL Story Tips: Pandemic impact, root studies, neutrons confirm, lab on a crystal and modeling fusion

Newswise: How Countries Are Reopening Schools During the Pandemic
Released: 4-Aug-2020 1:20 PM EDT
How Countries Are Reopening Schools During the Pandemic
Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)

Educators worldwide are facing the agonizing decision of whether to resume in-person instruction while there’s still no cure for the new coronavirus. Countries including Denmark, India, and Kenya are taking different approaches.

Released: 4-Aug-2020 11:55 AM EDT
ACTG Announces Launch of Novel Clinical Trial Testing Multiple Therapeutics to Treat COVID-19
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

The AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) has initiated the ACTIV-2 Outpatient Monoclonal Antibodies and Other Therapies Trial. ACTIV-2 includes both phase 2 and phase 3 evaluations of multiple promising investigational agents for treating early COVID-19 in a single trial.

Newswise:Video Embedded covid-19-study-confirms-low-transmission-in-educational-settings2
VIDEO
Released: 4-Aug-2020 11:20 AM EDT
COVID-19 study confirms low transmission in educational settings
University of Sydney

The rate of COVID-19 transmission in New South Wales (NSW) educational settings was extremely limited during the first wave of COVID-19, research findings published today in The Lancet Journal of Child and Adolescent Health have shown.

Newswise: Droplet Spread from Humans Doesn’t Always Follow Airflow
31-Jul-2020 3:15 PM EDT
Droplet Spread from Humans Doesn’t Always Follow Airflow
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

If aerosol transmission of COVID-19 is confirmed to be significant, as suspected, we will need to reconsider guidelines on social distancing, ventilation systems and shared spaces. Researchers in the U.K. believe a better understanding of different droplet behaviors and their different dispersion mechanisms is also needed. In Physics of Fluids, the group presents a model that demarcates differently sized droplets. This has implications for understanding the spread of airborne diseases, because the dispersion tests revealed the absence of intermediate-sized droplets.

Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:30 AM EDT
COVID-19 study confirms low transmission in educational settings
University of Sydney

The rate of COVID-19 transmission in New South Wales (NSW) educational settings was extremely limited during the first wave of COVID-19, research findings published today in The Lancet Journal of Child and Adolescent Health have shown.

Newswise: Researchers develop new mouse model for SARS-CoV-2
Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Researchers develop new mouse model for SARS-CoV-2
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Yale University School of Medicine have developed a new mouse model to study SARS-CoV-2 infection and disease and to accelerate testing of novel treatments and vaccines against the novel coronavirus. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), also suggests that, rather than protecting the lungs, key antiviral signaling proteins may actually cause much of the tissue damage associated with COVID-19.

Newswise: Exposure to common cold coronaviruses can teach the immune system to recognize SARS-CoV-2
Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Exposure to common cold coronaviruses can teach the immune system to recognize SARS-CoV-2
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

A new study led by scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) shows that memory helper T cells that recognize common cold coronaviruses also recognize matching sites on SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.


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