BIDMC’s Research & Health News Digest: June 2020 Edition

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Newswise — Welcome to the June 2020 Edition of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center’s (BIDMC) Research & Health News Digest. 

This edition’s update includes:

  • BIDMC-developed vaccines protect against COVID-19 in non-human primates, study finds
  • Researchers report sharp decline in patient visits for heart attack, stroke and cancer care during COVID-19 pandemic
  • Study confirms critically ill patients with COVID-19 benefit from mechanical ventilation
  • Reducing severe breathlessness and psychological trauma in COVID-19 ARDS patients
  • Researchers shed light on serotonin’s role in obstructive sleep apnea
  • International panel recommends unified approach for reporting placenta accreta spectrum
  • Study reveals concerning trend of brain bleeds in older adults
  • Stroke: Don't dismiss warning signs
  • Safe summer grilling

If any of these briefs pique your interest and you’d like to speak with one of our experts, please contact us at mediarelations@bidmc.harvard.edu or by contacting the BIDMC page operator at (617) 667-4700 by asking for pager ID #33880.

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BIDMC-developed vaccines protect against COVID-19 in non-human primates, study finds

Dan Barouch, MD, PhD (Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, BIDMC), and colleagues reported in Science two studies of laboratory monkeys that suggest antibodies produced during recovery from COVID-19 provide immunity from the virus, whether triggered by infection or vaccine.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/news/2020/05/covid-19-vaccine

 

Researchers report sharp decline in patient visits for heart attack, stroke and cancer care during COVID-19 pandemic

In a study led by Dhruv Kazi, MD, MSc, MS (Cardiology, BIDMC) and Kevin Tabb, MD (President & CEO, BILH), a team of researchers found that patient encounters for heart attack and stroke dropped by about a third and more than half, respectively, during the pandemic compared to patient visits during the same period in 2019. The researchers released a pre-print of the findings on MedRXiv.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/news/2020/05/kazi-emergency-care-covid-19

 

Study confirms critically ill patients with COVID-19 benefit from mechanical ventilation

Ari Moskowitz, MD (Pulmonary Disease, BIDMC) and colleagues studied the respiratory characteristics and response of patients with COVID-19 respiratory failure treated with invasive mechanical ventilation at two tertiary care hospitals. The team’s results, published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, supported the use of established respiratory therapy for treatment of COVID-19.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/news/2020/05/ventilation

 

Reducing severe breathlessness and psychological trauma in COVID-19 ARDS patients

A Viewpoint article published in the Annals of American Thoracic Society and written by Rich Schwartzstein, MD (Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, BIDMC), and colleagues, examines ventilation and medication strategies that can help avoid psychological trauma for severe COVID-19 survivors treated for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with medical ventilation. Schwartzstein asserts that outdated practices may lead to psychological trauma for patients who suffer from “air hunger” – a feeling of severe breathlessness.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/news/2020/06/reducing-breathlessness-in-covid-patients

 

Researchers shed light on serotonin’s role in obstructive sleep apnea

In a paper published in the journal Nature Communications, a team of researchers led by Clifford Saper, MD (Neurology, BIDMC), demonstrated that the neurotransmitter serotonin plays a critical role in rousing the brain from sleep when CO2 levels rise. Building on previous work that identified the specific neural circuitry at work in brains of mice in simulated apnea conditions, the new findings could lead to potential new drug therapies to help patients with obstructive sleep apnea get more rest.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/news/2020/06/sleep-apnea

 

International panel recommends unified approach for reporting placenta accreta spectrum

Under the leadership of Jonathan Hecht, MD, (Pathology, BIDMC), an international panel of experts were convened to create common technical language for pathologists and obstetricians that describe anatomic aspects of placenta accrete spectrum – a complication that occurs when the placenta attaches too deeply in the uterine wall – including the extent and location of abnormal placental invasion in the uterus or damage to surrounding organs. The new criteria and guidelines put forth by the panel are published in Modern Pathology.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/news/2020/06/reporting-placenta-accreta-spectrum

 

Study reveals concerning trend of brain bleeds in older adults

According to a new analysis of data from the Framingham Heart Study, a decades-long research project of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, incidence of intracerebral hemorrhage – a type of stroke caused by bleeding throughout the brain and its ventricles – has stabilized among most age groups but has increased among those older than 75 years old. The unexpected trend was reported by study first author Vasileios-Arsenios Lioutas, MD, (Neurology, BIDMC), and colleagues in JAMA Neurology.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/news/2020/06/risk-factors-of-intracerebral-hemorrhage

 

Stroke: Don't dismiss warning signs

Peter Zimetbaum, MD (Cardiovascular Medicine, BIDMC), and Alec Schmaier, MD (Cardiovascular Medicine, BIDMC) discuss the warning signs of a stroke.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/wellness-insights/heart-health/2020/05/stroke-dont-dismiss-warning-signs

 

Safe summer grilling

Lori DeCosta, MS, RD-AP, LDN (Nutrition, BIDMC) shares tips for safe summer grilling.

https://www.bidmc.org/about-bidmc/wellness-insights/summer-health/2018/07/safe-summer-grilling




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Newswise: Story Tips: Pandemic impact, root studies, neutrons confirm, lab on a crystal and modeling fusion
Released: 4-Aug-2020 1:25 PM EDT
Story Tips: Pandemic impact, root studies, neutrons confirm, lab on a crystal and modeling fusion
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

ORNL Story Tips: Pandemic impact, root studies, neutrons confirm, lab on a crystal and modeling fusion

Newswise: How Countries Are Reopening Schools During the Pandemic
Released: 4-Aug-2020 1:20 PM EDT
How Countries Are Reopening Schools During the Pandemic
Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)

Educators worldwide are facing the agonizing decision of whether to resume in-person instruction while there’s still no cure for the new coronavirus. Countries including Denmark, India, and Kenya are taking different approaches.

Released: 4-Aug-2020 11:55 AM EDT
ACTG Announces Launch of Novel Clinical Trial Testing Multiple Therapeutics to Treat COVID-19
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

The AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) has initiated the ACTIV-2 Outpatient Monoclonal Antibodies and Other Therapies Trial. ACTIV-2 includes both phase 2 and phase 3 evaluations of multiple promising investigational agents for treating early COVID-19 in a single trial.

Newswise:Video Embedded covid-19-study-confirms-low-transmission-in-educational-settings2
VIDEO
Released: 4-Aug-2020 11:20 AM EDT
COVID-19 study confirms low transmission in educational settings
University of Sydney

The rate of COVID-19 transmission in New South Wales (NSW) educational settings was extremely limited during the first wave of COVID-19, research findings published today in The Lancet Journal of Child and Adolescent Health have shown.

Newswise: Droplet Spread from Humans Doesn’t Always Follow Airflow
31-Jul-2020 3:15 PM EDT
Droplet Spread from Humans Doesn’t Always Follow Airflow
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

If aerosol transmission of COVID-19 is confirmed to be significant, as suspected, we will need to reconsider guidelines on social distancing, ventilation systems and shared spaces. Researchers in the U.K. believe a better understanding of different droplet behaviors and their different dispersion mechanisms is also needed. In Physics of Fluids, the group presents a model that demarcates differently sized droplets. This has implications for understanding the spread of airborne diseases, because the dispersion tests revealed the absence of intermediate-sized droplets.

Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:30 AM EDT
COVID-19 study confirms low transmission in educational settings
University of Sydney

The rate of COVID-19 transmission in New South Wales (NSW) educational settings was extremely limited during the first wave of COVID-19, research findings published today in The Lancet Journal of Child and Adolescent Health have shown.

Newswise: Researchers develop new mouse model for SARS-CoV-2
Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Researchers develop new mouse model for SARS-CoV-2
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Yale University School of Medicine have developed a new mouse model to study SARS-CoV-2 infection and disease and to accelerate testing of novel treatments and vaccines against the novel coronavirus. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), also suggests that, rather than protecting the lungs, key antiviral signaling proteins may actually cause much of the tissue damage associated with COVID-19.

Newswise: Exposure to common cold coronaviruses can teach the immune system to recognize SARS-CoV-2
Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Exposure to common cold coronaviruses can teach the immune system to recognize SARS-CoV-2
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

A new study led by scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) shows that memory helper T cells that recognize common cold coronaviruses also recognize matching sites on SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Newswise:Video Embedded protocol-needed-to-monitor-covid-19-disease-course
VIDEO
Released: 3-Aug-2020 9:05 PM EDT
Protocol needed to monitor COVID-19 disease course
University of Washington School of Medicine and UW Medicine

Patients with underlying conditions such as asthma or other lung problems should be checked on regularly by pulmonologists or primary-care doctors for at least six months. Some will need to be monitored for one to three years, according to a new opinion piece posted online today in The Lancet-Respiratory Medicine.

Newswise: UM Cardiology Researchers Studying How COVID-19 Affects the Heart
Released: 3-Aug-2020 3:10 PM EDT
UM Cardiology Researchers Studying How COVID-19 Affects the Heart
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

COVID-19 is shown to impact the heart and, in some cases, have long-lasting cardiac effects. To discover the extent to which COVID-19 affects the heart, cardiologists and researchers with the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have begun multiple studies.


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