Expert Pitch

Business experts are available to comment on the challenges of COVID-19 vaccine shortages, distribution, and demand.

Indiana University
29-Jan-2021 4:15 PM EST, by Indiana University

INDIANAPOLIS and BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Alleviating the coronavirus pandemic rests on worldwide vaccination efforts, but many countries are reporting dwindling supplies of the COVID-19 vaccine. At the same time, the Biden administration aims to buy 200 million more doses, to provide enough vaccine for the entire adult U.S. population by the end of the summer. How will drugmakers like Moderna and Pfizer be able to meet the demand and handle the enormous logistical challenges of distributing doses? Experts from Indiana University Bloomington and IUPUI are available to discuss these topics.

Amrou Awaysheh

Expertise: Corporate social responsibility, operations management, supply chain management, data science and analytics, business innovation, disruptive technology.

Amrou Awaysheh is an assistant professor of operations management at the Kelley School of Business. He is also the director of the Global Supply Chain Enterprise. His research focuses on how firms manage socially responsible practices in their operations and supply chains and the impact that has on firm performance.

Kyle Cattani

Expertise: Operations management, supply chain management, managing operations in the presence of uncertainty, managing product end-of-life, mass customization.

A member of the IU Kelley School of Business faculty since 2005, Kyle Cattani is professor of operations management, chair of the Full-Time MBA Program and the SungKyunKwan Professor. Since 2017, he has served as associate editor of the Journal of Operations Management, and he also is senior editor at Production and Operations Management Society.

Maryam Khatami

Expertise: Stochastic programming, healthcare systems engineering, supply chain management, energy

Maryam Khatami is an expert on stochastic programming applied to healthcare systems engineering, supply chain management, and energy. She has the experience of collaborating with several hospitals to improve patient flow and reduce congestion in hospitals, more specifically in the emergency department. She has also conducted research on supply chain network design and location-routing problems. She develops rigorous mathematical models to formulate and solve these problems using real data​. She received her Ph.D. in Industrial and Systems Engineering from Texas A&M University and B.S. and M.S. degrees in industrial engineering from Amirkabir University of Technology, Iran.

Mohan Tatikonda

Expertise: International trade, Lean Six Sigma, complex new product and service development, startup firms, supply chain management, global competition, corporate strategy, international manufacturing competitiveness, entrepreneurship, incubators, health care delivery, life sciences.

Mohan Tatikonda is a professor of operations management at the Indiana University Kelley School of Business whose research focuses on how firms can most effectively design, develop, introduce and improve products, services and organizational processes. His research addresses managing development projects in global environments, fostering technology transfer in the supply chain, behavioral decision-making by supply chain managers, six-sigma program and project effectiveness, and the consumer privacy implications of RFID technology and other advanced technologies.



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Embargo will expire: 17-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 15-Jun-2021 1:20 PM EDT

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Released: 15-Jun-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Common cold combats COVID-19
Yale University

Exposure to the rhinovirus, the most frequent cause of the common cold, can protect against infection by the virus which causes COVID-19, Yale researchers have found.

Released: 15-Jun-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Researchers Develop More Reliable Rapid Tests for COVID-19
University of Maryland Medical Center

Researchers Develop More Reliable Rapid Tests for COVID-19 Public Release Date: 15-Jun-2021 00:00:00 US Eastern Time (24hr) Research News Release Contact Person: Deborah Kotz Contact Phone: 410-706-4255 Contact E-mail: Journal: Nature Protocols DOI: 10.1038/s41596-021-00546-w Funder: Grant Number(s): Meeting: Primary Keyword: Medicine/Health Keywords: Medicine/Health -> Diagnostics Medicine/Health -> Infectious/Emerging Diseases Subtitle: Tests Use Innovative Techniques That Improve Accuracy Rivaling Gold Standard PCR Test Summary: Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have developed two rapid diagnostic tests for COVID-19 that are nearly as accurate as the gold-standard test currently used in laboratories. Unlike the gold standard test, which extracts RNA and uses it to amplify the DNA of the virus, these new tests can detect the presence of the virus in as little as five minutes using different methods.

Newswise: SARS-CoV-2 Worldwide Replication Drives Rapid Rise and Selection of Mutations
Released: 15-Jun-2021 11:40 AM EDT
SARS-CoV-2 Worldwide Replication Drives Rapid Rise and Selection of Mutations
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

The number of COVID-19 variants is growing rapidly, so much that the scale and scope of mutation may pose a threat to the continuing successful use of the current vaccines and therapies. The findings, by an international team that includes University of California researchers, are being published in the June edition of the peer-reviewed journal EMBO Molecular Medicine. The pace of variation of the SARS-CoV-2 virus strains makes plain the threat that rapidly evolving new strains might give rise to escape variants, capable of limiting the efficacy of vaccines, therapies, and diagnostic tests.

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VIDEO
14-Jun-2021 5:20 PM EDT
What makes us sneeze?
Washington University in St. Louis

What exactly triggers a sneeze? A team led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified, in mice, specific cells and proteins that control the sneeze reflex. Better understanding of what causes us to sneeze — specifically how neurons behave in response to allergens and viruses — may point to treatments capable of slowing the spread of infectious respiratory diseases.

14-Jun-2021 11:40 AM EDT
Rapid exclusion of COVID-19 infection using AI, EKG technology
Mayo Clinic

Artificial intelligence (AI) may offer a way to accurately determine that a person is not infected with COVID-19. An international retrospective study finds that infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, creates subtle electrical changes in the heart. An AI-enhanced EKG can detect these changes and potentially be used as a rapid, reliable COVID-19 screening test to rule out COVID-19 infection.

Newswise: For Transplant Recipients, Third Time May Be the Charm for Better COVID Vaccine Protection
Released: 14-Jun-2021 5:15 PM EDT
For Transplant Recipients, Third Time May Be the Charm for Better COVID Vaccine Protection
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a study published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they believe that, for the first time, there is evidence to show that three doses of vaccine increase antibody levels against SARS-CoV-2 — the virus that causes COVID 19 — more than the standard two-dose regimen for people who have received solid organ transplants.

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Released: 14-Jun-2021 4:05 PM EDT
What’s Next: The Ongoing Urban Exodus
University of California, Irvine

Many employees have come to prefer working from home after being forced to do so more than a year ago when the pandemic started. By some estimates, at least one-quarter of employees will still be working remotely multiple days a week at the end of 2021. For those whose jobs allow it, being untethered from the office might mean moving farther away from it – by a few miles or a few hundred.

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Released: 14-Jun-2021 2:50 PM EDT
New model accounts for the effect of behavior changes to predict COVID-19 cases
Brown University

By adding behavioral components to an infectious disease model, Brown University researchers have developed a new modeling approach that captures the peaks and valleys in new COVID-19 cases seen over the past 16 months.

Newswise: Masking, breakthrough infections and telehealth: Keck Medicine of USC experts on life after June 15
Released: 14-Jun-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Masking, breakthrough infections and telehealth: Keck Medicine of USC experts on life after June 15
Keck Medicine of USC

June 15 is a banner day in California. Most COVID-19 statewide restrictions will be eliminated, including physical distancing and in many situations, mask mandates. How will life change and how will it stay the same? Keck Medicine of USC experts weigh in on what to expect next in the golden state.


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