Collectivism drives efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19

Research from the University of Kent has found that people who adopt a collectivist mindset are more likely to comply with social distancing and hygiene practices to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.
29-Jun-2020 1:45 PM EDT, by University of Kent

Newswise — Research from the University of Kent has found that people who adopt a collectivist mindset are more likely to comply with social distancing and hygiene practices to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

People who are more individualist are less likely to engage, partly due to beliefs in COVID-19 conspiracy theories, and feelings of powerlessness surrounding the pandemic.

This study suggests the need for the UK Government and other world leaders to consider promoting collectivism amongst the general public, and to combat the spread of conspiracy theories and other types of misinformation. Doing so may increase levels of engagement in practices to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

The research was led by Mikey Biddlestone alongside Ricky Green and Professor Karen Douglas at the University of Kent's School of Psychology. A total of 724 participants completed an online questionnaire addressing their actions relating to social distancing and hygiene measures, their individualist-collectivist mindset, feelings of powerlessness surrounding the pandemic, and their beliefs in COVID-19 conspiracy theories such as the idea that COVID-19 was made in a Chinese laboratory.

Mikey Biddlestone said: 'Interventions that focus on collective empowerment and champion a 'we are in this together' mentality could encourage people to comply with guidelines that will reduce the spread of COVID-19. Promoting collectivism could make a positive difference to future public health crises too, as leaders look to improve response strategies. A collectivist mindset might also make people less susceptible to conspiracy theories and misinformation that can negatively affect their behaviour.'

###

SEE ORIGINAL STUDY




Filters close

Showing results

1120 of 3821
Newswise: UNH Digs Deep Testing Wastewater for Early Warning Signs of COVID-19
Released: 28-Oct-2020 1:05 PM EDT
UNH Digs Deep Testing Wastewater for Early Warning Signs of COVID-19
University of New Hampshire

The University of New Hampshire has gone underground to flush out cases of the coronavirus by testing wastewater on campus. The sewage sampling is being used as a secondary surveillance method to the already required twice a week individual nasal test to track and detect SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Newswise: Safely Celebrate the Holidays During COVID-19
Released: 28-Oct-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Safely Celebrate the Holidays During COVID-19
Rush University Medical Center

Families gathered around the table for hours to share food, conversation and laughter — all the ingredients for a joyous holiday -- and the spread of COVID-19. Rush infectious disease specialists and a child psychologist share facts and tips for enjoying the holidays safely.

Released: 28-Oct-2020 12:45 PM EDT
COVID-19 vaccine nationalism could cost world up to $1.2 trillion: New RAND Europe study
RAND Corporation

Nationalistic behaviour by governments may exclude some countries from gaining access to COVID-19 vaccines and cost the global economy up to $1.2 trillion a year in GDP, according to a new study from the not-for-profit research organisation RAND Europe.

Newswise:Video Embedded first-came-breast-cancer-then-covid-19
VIDEO
Released: 28-Oct-2020 12:00 PM EDT
First Came Breast Cancer, Then COVID-19
Cedars-Sinai

Natalie Coehlo wasn’t concerned at first about the sudden rash on her left breast last December. Six months later, though, when the rash had morphed into sores, she visited her primary care physician in Tulare, California.

Newswise: 247119_web.jpg
Released: 28-Oct-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Lockdown interviews show poor housing quality has made life even tougher
University of Huddersfield

Life during COVID-19 has not been a uniform experience. There have been distinct differences in how people have contended with lockdown, depending on whether they have access to safe, secure and decent accommodation.

Released: 28-Oct-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Cognitive disorders linked to severe COVID-19 risk
University of Georgia

Dementia and other cognitive disorders now appear to be risk factors for developing severe COVID-19, according to research from the University of Georgia.

Newswise: University of Miami serving as pilot study site for new, rapid coronavirus breathalyzer test
Released: 28-Oct-2020 11:40 AM EDT
University of Miami serving as pilot study site for new, rapid coronavirus breathalyzer test
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

By participating in a short clinical research study that begins this week, the University of Miami became the first college testing site for a quick, easy, and cost-effective Israeli-produced COVID-19 Breath Analyzer that could revolutionize coronavirus testing if approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Newswise: UB spinoff Cytocybernetics receives funding to accelerate COVID-19 drug screening
Released: 28-Oct-2020 11:35 AM EDT
UB spinoff Cytocybernetics receives funding to accelerate COVID-19 drug screening
University at Buffalo

University at Buffalo spinoff Cytocybernetics is developing a high-tech tool called CyberQ to rapidly assess whether or not investigational COVID-19 drugs have arrhythmogenic properties that can result in sudden cardiac death.

Newswise: Nova Southeastern University Researchers Receive $4 Million From CDC for ‘COVID Long Haulers’ Study
Released: 28-Oct-2020 11:30 AM EDT
Nova Southeastern University Researchers Receive $4 Million From CDC for ‘COVID Long Haulers’ Study
Nova Southeastern University

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to evolve, health care providers are finding more and more patients are experiencing lingering symptoms after recovering from the virus. While the medical community is still working hard to address the virus itself and racing toward a vaccine, there is very little known or being done to address these residual health issues being experienced by those now called “COVID long haulers.” But all of that is about to change, thanks to research scientists at Nova Southeastern University (NSU.)


Showing results

1120 of 3821

close
1.23809