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University of California, Irvine

Coronavirus psychological impact may exceed actual threat to physical health, say UCI experts

Newswise — The H1N1 pandemic in 2009 ... the 2014 Ebola epidemic ... the 2017 Zika outbreak ... the 2020 Coronavirus crisis. Worldwide public health threats often impact people psychologically beyond the impact of the actual biological agent, say University of California, Irvine researchers.

Roxane Cohen Silver, UCI professor of psychological science; Rebecca R. Thompson, a psychological science postdoctoral scholar; Dana Rose Garfin, adjunct faculty in the Sue & Bill Gross School of Nursing; and E. Alison Holman, an associate professor in the Sue & Bill Gross School of Nursing, conducted a study of Americans' responses to Ebola. Their 2017 findings, published online in the journal Association for Psychological Science, are very relevant to the reactions to today's Coronavirus outbreak.

They can answer questions such as:

  • Has the coverage by mainstream media been sensationalized?
  • Does the constant deluge of stories, from China's recent admission of "shortcomings" and "deficiencies" in its handling and sharing of information sensationalize mainstream media coverage of the outbreak?
  • What is social media's impact on people's response to Coronavirus stories?
  • Is there a recommended limit to how much Coronavirus media coverage one should consume - mainstream and social?
  • What can people do to help alleviate negative psychological outcomes?
  • What role should government agencies like the CDC and local health providers play in providing the public with accurate information?

 

 




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Newswise:Video Embedded pregnant-women-should-consider-taking-the-covid-19-vaccine
VIDEO
Released: 18-Jan-2021 7:50 AM EST
Pregnant women should consider taking the COVID-19 vaccine.
University of Washington School of Medicine

f pregnant individuals catch COVID they will generally get sicker than non-pregnant individuals. They also more commonly end up on ECMO [heart-lung support], in the ICU or on ventilators.

Newswise: Have allergies? Worried about COVID-19 vaccine? Don’t be.
Released: 18-Jan-2021 7:40 AM EST
Have allergies? Worried about COVID-19 vaccine? Don’t be.
UW Medicine

Even people who have experienced severe allergic reactions to food, latex, pets, pollen, or bee stings should get the coronavirus vaccine, UW Medicine allergy and infectious disease experts say.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 5:40 PM EST
Research Links Social Isolation to COVID-19 Protocol Resistance
Humboldt State University

As health officials continue to implore the public to wear masks and practice social distancing, recent research by Humboldt State University Psychology Professor Amber Gaffney provides key insights into connections between social isolation, conspiratorial thinking, and resistance to COVID-19 protocols.

Newswise: Rapid blood test identifies COVID-19 patients at high risk of severe disease
Released: 15-Jan-2021 5:35 PM EST
Rapid blood test identifies COVID-19 patients at high risk of severe disease
Washington University in St. Louis

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that a relatively simple and rapid blood test can predict which patients with COVID-19 are at highest risk of severe complications or death. The blood test measures levels of mitochondrial DNA, which normally resides inside the energy factories of cells. Mitochondrial DNA spilling out of cells and into the bloodstream is a sign that a particular type of violent cell death is taking place in the body.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 2:55 PM EST
COVID-19 deaths really are different. But best practices for ICU care should still apply, studies suggest.
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

COVID-19 deaths are indeed different from other lung failure deaths, according to two recent studies, with 56% of COVID-19 patients dying primarily from the lung damage caused by the virus, compared with 22% of those whose lungs fail due to other causes. But, the researchers conclude, the kind of care needed to help sustain people through the worst cases of all forms of lung failure is highly similar, and just needs to be fine-tuned.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 2:50 PM EST
45% of adults over 65 lack online medical accounts that could help them sign up for COVID-19 vaccinations
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

As the vaccination of older adults against COVID-19 begins across the country, new poll data suggests that many of them don’t yet have access to the “patient portal” online systems that could make it much easier for them to schedule a vaccination appointment. In all, 45% of adults aged 65 to 80 had not set up an account with their health provider’s portal system.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 1:30 PM EST
New England Journal of Medicine publishes COVID-19 treatment trial results
University of Texas at San Antonio

A clinical trial involving COVID-19 patients hospitalized at UT Health San Antonio and University Health, among roughly 100 sites globally, found that a combination of the drugs baricitinib and remdesivir reduced time to recovery, according to results published Dec. 11 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 12:40 PM EST
DNA test can quickly identify pneumonia in patients with severe COVID-19, aiding faster treatment
University of Cambridge

Researchers have developed a DNA test to quickly identify secondary infections in COVID-19 patients, who have double the risk of developing pneumonia while on ventilation than non-COVID-19 patients.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 12:30 PM EST
Fight CRC To Present Research Findings on The Impact of COVID-19 on the Colorectal Cancer Community at 2021 GI ASCO
Fight Colorectal Cancer

Fight Colorectal Cancer presents abstract at Gastrointestinal Cancer Symposium highlighting the need to address the barriers and opportunities for care within the colorectal cancer community during the COVID-19 pandemic


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