Cedars-Sinai

COVID-19 and the Future of Cardiac Care

From the Lasting Effects on Stroke and Heart Attack Patients Who Do Not Seek Care to How to Resume Cardiac Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Expert Provides Forecast for the Future of Care
18-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT, by Cedars-Sinai contact patient services

Newswise — LOS ANGELES (June 18, 2020) - As Cedars-Sinai expands telehealth and video visits and resumes surgeries, Joanna Chikwe, MD, chair of the Department of Cardiac Surgery at the Smidt Heart Institute, has her focus on one thing: ensuring that patients with heart disease understand it is safe to be seen, and treated, by Cedars-Sinai healthcare teams.

In three recent publications, Chikwe describes how flattening the COVID-19 curve has come at a "terrible cost" for patients with heart conditions. Chikwe also outlines how surgeons, hospitals and ambulatory care centers can safely resume caring for cardiac surgery patients in the era of the virus. 

"Patients are now scared to go to their primary care doctors, their cardiologists' offices and the emergency room, where admissions are down by over 70% in many institutions," reads an article Chikwe co-authored with Christine Albert, MD, MPH, chair of the Department of Cardiology. The article was published in Cardiology, a publication of the American College of Cardiology. "There is no way of knowing how many patients are dying at home of cardiac causes unrelated to COVID-19 because they have delayed seeking medical attention." 

The finding that cardiac admissions are down by over 70% in many institutions comes from a published paper in the journal Circulation, of which Chikwe served as an author. 

In the study, researchers surveyed 60 cardiac surgery centers in North and South America, Europe, Asia and Australia during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey represented over 600 cardiac surgeons and found the median reduction in cardiac surgery case volume was 50% to 75%, with many centers indicating their surgeons were not performing any elective surgeries. 

As a follow-up to the study, Chikwe served as lead author on new recommendations published in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery that provide guidance around safely resuming cardiac surgery, research and education amid COVID-19.

The recommendations were developed by committee discussion within a cardiovascular research consortium representing 19 countries and a broad spectrum of cardiac surgery experience. The authors recommended that cardiac surgery be among the first clinical services supported so that elective inpatient and outpatient care can be resumed as soon as possible. Additionally, all patients should be screened for COVID-19 prior to surgery.

"Our practical recommendations are intended to support local decision-making according to governmental requirements, regional disease prevalence, institutional capacity and ethics," said Chikwe.

Cedars-Sinai staff has already implemented the key recommendations in the consensus statements, including testing before every procedure.

"State-of-the-art screening and prevention services at Cedars-Sinai create a safe environment for the highest quality cardiac care," said Eduardo Marbán, MD, PhD, executive director if the Smidt Heart Institute. "We are committed to ensuring that patients in need not delay seeking treatment for fear of contracting COVID-19." 

Before and after procedures, as much as possible is now being done remotely, to save patients the risk and expense of in-person visits.

"Above all, we want all patients – especially those with cardiac care needs – to know it's safe and easier than ever to see your doctor and get the treatment you need," said Chikwe.

More information for patients and visitors is available here.

Read more on the Cedars-Sinai Blog: The Race to Develop a Vaccine for COVID-19.

SEE ORIGINAL STUDY




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 2836
access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 10-Aug-2020 8:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 7-Aug-2020 7:30 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 10-Aug-2020 8:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 7-Aug-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Alcoholism treatment is potentially effective against COVID-19
National Research University - Higher School of Economics (HSE)

A team of chemists from HSE University and the Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry used molecular modelling to find out that two medications that have been known for a long time can be used to fight SARS-CoV-2.

Newswise: 239651_web.jpg
Released: 7-Aug-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Electric cooker an easy, efficient way to sanitize N95 masks, study finds
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Owners of electric multicookers may be able to add another use to its list of functions, a new study suggests: sanitization of N95 respirator masks.

Released: 7-Aug-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Study: Most Americans don't have enough assets to withstand 3 months without income
Oregon State University

A new study from Oregon State University found that 77% of low- to moderate-income American households fall below the asset poverty threshold, meaning that if their income were cut off they would not have the financial assets to maintain at least poverty-level status for three months.

Released: 7-Aug-2020 11:55 AM EDT
COVID recovery choices shape future climate
University of Leeds

A post-lockdown economic recovery plan that incorporates and emphasises climate-friendly choices could help significantly in the battle against global warming, according to a new study.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 11-Aug-2020 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 7-Aug-2020 10:55 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 11-Aug-2020 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 7-Aug-2020 9:45 AM EDT
Potentially predictive humoral immune response markers in COVID-19 patients
Massachusetts General Hospital

Galit Alter, PhD, Group Leader at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Helen Chu, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, University of Washington School of Medicine, and UW Medicine physician, have recently published a paper which identifies five immune response markers which, collectively, were able to correctly classify both convalescent COVID-19 patients and those who did not survive the disease

Released: 7-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
ACSM Publishes Call to Action Addressing COVID-19 and Return to Sports and Physical Activity
American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)

ACSM published a call to action statement addressing COVID-19 and safely returning to sports and exercise. Authored by ACSM subject matter experts, the statement highlights the current science around COVID-19 and provides 12 action steps to consider. “COVID-19: Considerations for Sports and Physical Activity” is ACSM’s first call to action statement and published in the August issue of Current Sports Medicine Reports.

Newswise: University of Miami Sports Medicine Institute expert leads call to action for harnessing exercise’s health benefits during the pandemic
7-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
University of Miami Sports Medicine Institute expert leads call to action for harnessing exercise’s health benefits during the pandemic
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

To address and overcome the challenges so Americans can return to or sustain physical activity safely, Thomas M. Best, M.D., Ph.D., FACSM, professor of orthopedic surgery at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and research director of the UHealth Sports Medicine Institute, and sports medicine colleagues from around the U.S. wrote “COVID-19: Considerations for Sports and Physical Activity,” published August 7 in Current Sports Medicine Reports, an American College of Sports Medicine journal.


Showing results

110 of 2836

close
0.73468