Cedars-Sinai

COVID-19: Don't Stop Taking Your Medications

12-May-2020 10:05 AM EDT, by Cedars-Sinai contact patient services

Newswise — LOS ANGELES (May 12, 2020) -- With the pandemic disrupting our everyday lives, routine errands have become challenging for seniors and others who run a high-risk of developing a serious COVID-19 infection. But there's one routine they should not let lapse: refilling medications.

"Many of my patients are afraid to leave the house, especially those who are older and those who have chronic medical conditions. They don't want to go to the pharmacy or do anything that could put them at risk of getting COVID-19," said pharmacist Christine Armbruster, PharmD.

"Do not delay refilling prescriptions," Armbruster said. "If you have a chronic condition like diabetes, high blood pressure or high cholesterol, or you are on blood thinners, you might not feel the effects of skipping doses right away. However, missing medication doses can seriously harm your health and even send you to the emergency room." 

Armbruster works in the Cedars-Sinai Pharmacy Department, helping manage medications for high-risk patients who have been discharged from the hospital or for those who have chronic conditions. She offered the following tips for staying on top of your medications during the pandemic:

  • Don't skip medical appointments. Keep working with your medical provider to manage your health. Many providers are handling appointments over the phone or via video chat when possible. If you need to visit a lab to have blood drawn or a clinic, safety measures have been put in place to protect your health.
  • Use one pharmacy. Using the same pharmacy for all of your medications helps pharmacists keep an eye on prescriptions that might cause interactions or be unnecessary. They may also be able to refill all of your prescriptions at the same time on the same schedule to avoid multiple pick-ups.
  • Organize your meds. Keep your medications in a pill box that you refill on the same day each week. It will give you a better sense of when you're running low.
  • Keep an up-to-date medication list. The list should include each drug you take-including over-the-counter drugs that don't require a prescription, vitamins, herbal supplements-and how often you take each one. This will help you take your medications as prescribed and help medical providers and pharmacists know what you are taking and whether any changes are needed.
  • Plan ahead. Ask your medical provider if they can change chronic prescriptions-those that you need to take daily or routinely-to 90-day supplies. Contact your pharmacy for refills five to seven business days before you run out of a medication.
  • Get prescriptions delivered. Many local pharmacies have begun offering delivery services. If you don't have a friend or loved on who can pick up your order, call your pharmacy to see if they can do a safe drop off on the doorstep of your home.
  • Get access to healthy food. Diets have changed during the pandemic as people eat more canned foods that are high in sodium, which may exacerbate conditions such as high blood pressure or heart failure. Access to fresh vegetables also has been affected. If you can't get food delivery through an app or loved one, call your local Department of Aging or your county's information hotline, which may offer assistance.
  • If you must go out, be safe. Stay at least six feet away from others, use hand sanitizer, don't touch your face and wear a mask or a cloth face covering.

"Pharmacists ensure that a patient's treatment plan is carried out the way it was intended," said Rita Shane, PharmD, chief pharmacy officer and professor of medicine at Cedars-Sinai. "During times like these, that's more important than ever." 

Read more on the Cedars-Sinai Blog: Ask a Pharmacist-Cedars-Sinai's Rita Shane

 




Filters close

Showing results

2130 of 2911
access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 18-Aug-2020 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 13-Aug-2020 8:15 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 18-Aug-2020 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise:Video Embedded sharp-jump-in-stillbirths-during-covid-lockdown
VIDEO
Released: 12-Aug-2020 9:05 PM EDT
Sharp jump in stillbirths during COVID lockdown
University of South Australia

A four-fold increase in stillbirths in a large UK maternity hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic might also be replicated in Australia and elsewhere due to guidelines which have discouraged face-to-face antenatal visits in recent months.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 14-Aug-2020 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 12-Aug-2020 7:05 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 14-Aug-2020 2:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: Preliminary study of 300+ COVID-19 patients suggests convalescent plasma therapy effective
Released: 12-Aug-2020 6:30 PM EDT
Preliminary study of 300+ COVID-19 patients suggests convalescent plasma therapy effective
Houston Methodist

A preliminary analysis of an ongoing study of more than 300 COVID-19 patients treated with convalescent plasma therapy at Houston Methodist suggests the treatment is safe and effective. The results, published in The American Journal of Pathology, represent one of the first peer-reviewed publications in the country assessing efficacy of convalescent plasma and offer valuable scientific evidence that transfusing critically ill COVID-19 patients with high antibody plasma early in their illness reduced the mortality rate.

Newswise: When you’re smiling, the whole world really does smile with you
11-Aug-2020 11:00 PM EDT
When you’re smiling, the whole world really does smile with you
University of South Australia

From Sinatra to Katy Perry, celebrities have long sung about the power of a smile – how it picks you up, changes your outlook, and generally makes you feel better. But is it all smoke and mirrors, or is there a scientific backing to the claim? Groundbreaking research from the University of South Australia confirms that the act of smiling can trick your mind into being more positive, simply by moving your facial muscles.

Released: 12-Aug-2020 3:50 PM EDT
MTSU, Texas State professors posit pandemic offers 'largest criminological experiment in history'
Middle Tennessee State University

In a research paper published in the American Journal of Criminal Justice, Ben Stickle, an associate professor of criminal justice administration, posits that the novel coronavirus tragedy presents a unique opportunity for a “randomized control trial.” The paper is co-authored by Stickle and Marcus Felson of Texas State University in San Marcos, Texas.

Newswise:Video Embedded clearing-confusion-on-asymptomatic-spread
VIDEO
Released: 12-Aug-2020 3:30 PM EDT
Clearing confusion on asymptomatic spread
UW Medicine

Confusion abounds about the difference between asymptomatic and pre-symptomatic infections when it comes to the pandemic coronavirus. Dr. John Lynch, medical director of infection prevention and control at Harborview, explains what it means.

Released: 12-Aug-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Survey Results Detail Signs of Improving Conditions for CRNAs
American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA)

The American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) discovered in a new survey that employment opportunities for Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) during the COVID-19 public health crisis is improving.

Released: 12-Aug-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Combating child weight gain during COVID-19
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

The infamous “Quarantine 15,” a reference to packing on the pounds during the pandemic, is affecting even the youngest of Americans, according to UT Physicians pediatricians, who are seeing the evidence in front of them via telemedicine appointments.

Newswise:Video Embedded jhu-robotic-system-remotely-controls-ventilators-in-covid-19-patient-rooms
VIDEO
Released: 12-Aug-2020 1:10 PM EDT
JHU Robotic System Remotely Controls Ventilators In COVID-19 Patient Rooms
Johns Hopkins University

A new robotic system allows medical staff to remotely operate ventilators and other bedside machines from outside intensive care rooms of patients suffering from infectious diseases.


Showing results

2130 of 2911

close
3.03894