COVID-19 may deplete testosterone, helping to explain male patients' poorer prognosis

Over half of male patients studied were found to have lower than their normal testosterone levels
28-Sep-2020 5:10 PM EDT, by Taylor & Francis

Newswise — For the first time, data from a study with patients hospitalized due to COVID-19 suggest that the disease might deteriorate men's testosterone levels.

Publishing their results in the peer-reviewed journal The Aging Male, experts from the University of Mersin and the Mersin City Education And Research Hospital in Turkey found as men's testosterone level at baseline decreases, the probability for them to be in the intensive care unit (ICU) significantly increases.

Lead author Selahittin Çayan, Professor of Urology, states that while it has already been reported that low testosterone levels could be a cause for poor prognosis following a positive SARS-CoV-2 test, this is the first study to show that COVID-19 itself depletes testosterone.

It is hoped that the development could help to explain why so many studies have found that male prognosis is worse than those females with COVID-19, and therefore to discover possible improvement in clinical outcomes using testosterone-based treatments.

"Testosterone is associated with the immune system of respiratory organs, and low levels of testosterone might increase the risk of respiratory infections. Low testosterone is also associated with infection-related hospitalisation and all-cause mortality in male in ICU patients, so testosterone treatment may also have benefits beyond improving outcomes for COVID-19," Professor Çayan explains.

"In our study, the mean total testosterone decreased, as the severity of the COVID-19 increased. The mean total testosterone level was significantly lower in the ICU group than in the asymptomatic group. In addition, the mean total testosterone level was significantly lower in the ICU group than in the Intermediate Care Unit group. The mean serum follicle stimulating hormone level was significantly higher in the ICU group than in the asymptomatic group.

"We found, Hypogonadism - a condition in which the body doesn't produce enough testosterone -in 113 (51.1%) of the male patients.

"The patients who died, had significantly lower mean total testosterone than the patients who were alive.

"However, even 65.2% of the 46 male patients who were asymptomatic had a loss of loss of libido."

The research team looked at a total of 438 patients. This included 232 males, each with laboratory confirmed SARS-CoV-2. All data were prospectively collected. A detailed clinical history, complete physical examination, laboratory and radiological imaging studies were performed in every patient. All data of the patients were checked and reviewed by the two physicians.

The cohort study was divided into three groups: asymptomatic patients (n: 46), symptomatic patients who were hospitalized in the internal medicine unit (IMU) (n: 129), and patients who were hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) (n: 46).

In the patients who had pre-COVID-19 serum gonadal hormones test (n: 24), serum total testosterone level significantly decreased from pre-COVID-19 level of 458?±?198?ng/dl to 315?±?120?ng/dl at the time of COVID-19 in the patients (p?=?0.003).

Death was observed in 11 of the male adult patients (4.97%) and 7 of the female patients (3.55%), revealing no significance between the two genders (p?>?0.05).

Commenting on the results of the study, Professor Çayan added: "It could be recommended that at the time of COVID-19 diagnosis, testosterone levels are also tested. In men with low levels of sex hormones who test positive for COVID-19, testosterone treatment could improve their prognosis. More research is needed on this."

The limitations of this study include it not including a control group of patients with conditions other than COVID-19, this was due to the restrictions placed on the hospital that they were monitoring the patients in.

The authors state future studies should look at the concentration levels of ACE2 (Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2) - an enzyme attached to the cell membranes of cells located in the intestines -, in relationship with the total testosterone levels.

###

SEE ORIGINAL STUDY




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 3765
Released: 23-Oct-2020 4:55 PM EDT
Woman recovering from COVID-19 shares experience as monoclonal antibody clinical trial participant
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

When Christina Loville tested positive for the coronavirus, she was terrified. She decided to channel her fear into researching COVID-19 treatments, where she discovered a local clinical trial led by experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Released: 23-Oct-2020 4:30 PM EDT
"Third spike" in COVID-19 cases, plus the vaccine trials: Live Expert Panel for October 29, 3PM EDT
Newswise

"Third spike" in COVID-19 cases, plus the vaccine trials: Live Expert Panel for October 29, 3PM EDT

Released: 23-Oct-2020 1:50 PM EDT
Are we really “rounding the corner" when it comes the coronavirus pandemic?
Newswise

“We’re rounding the turn,” Trump said during the debate. This implies a meaningful improvement. We rate this claim as false. On that very same day the U.S. recorded 77,000 new cases, according to NBC News. This tops the previous high that had been set in July. We may be learning to "live with it," as Trump mentioned, but this is not an improvement.

Newswise: 246719_web.jpg
Released: 23-Oct-2020 12:50 PM EDT
NRL researchers evaluate ultraviolet sources, combat COVID-19
United States Naval Research Laboratory

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory researchers evaluated commercial ultraviolet (UV) sources for viral disinfection to combat COVID-19 on land and at sea, and established a dedicated UV characterization lab in five days to ensure safe introduction and effective operation of UV sources across the Fleet.

Released: 23-Oct-2020 12:05 PM EDT
COVID-19 anxiety linked to body image issues
Anglia Ruskin University

A new study has found that anxiety and stress directly linked to COVID-19 could be causing a number of body image issues amongst women and men.

Newswise: 246747_web.jpg
Released: 23-Oct-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Eliminating COVID-19: What the world can learn from NZ and Taiwan
University of Otago

Both Taiwan and New Zealand have successfully eliminated COVID-19 with world-leading pandemic responses. By taking a particularly proactive approach, Taiwan's response was probably the most effective and least disruptive of any country's, researchers say.

Released: 23-Oct-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Healthcare's earthquake: Lessons from COVID-19
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

The COVID-19 pandemic has fundamentally disrupted U.S. healthcare organizations.

Released: 23-Oct-2020 10:50 AM EDT
COVID-19 lockdown reduced mental health, sleep, exercise
Pennington Biomedical Research Center

A first-of-its-kind global survey shows the initial phase of the COVID-19 lockdown dramatically altered our personal habits, largely for the worse.

Released: 23-Oct-2020 10:45 AM EDT
New Data on Increasing Cloth Mask Effectiveness
Society for Risk Analysis (SRA)

A new study published in Risk Analysis, “Reinventing cloth masks in the face of pandemics,” by Stephen Salter, P.Eng., describes how Effective Fiber Mask Programs (EFMPs) can help communities find a balance between the economy and curbing community spread.


Showing results

110 of 3765

close
0.77056