Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Dr. Maurice O’Gorman to Speak on AAAS Webinar about Immune System Monitoring to Combat COVID-19

Maurice O’Gorman, PhD, MSc, will participate in an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) webinar about monitoring the immune system as a way to fight COVID-19 on Thursday, April 30, at noon ET.

Newswise — Maurice O’Gorman, PhD, MSc, will participate in an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) webinar about monitoring the immune system as a way to fight COVID-19 on Thursday, April 30, at noon ET.  

He will be part of an expert panel of speakers that will also include Andrea Cossarizza, MD, PhD, Vice Dean of the School of Medicine at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia in Italy, and President of the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry, and Lishomwa Ndhlovu, MBBS, PhD, a Professor of immunology at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York and Principal Investigator of the HIV and Emerging Pathogens Immunopathogenesis Laboratory. 

Dr. O’Gorman, Chief of Laboratory Medicine at CHLA and Professor of Pathology and Pediatrics at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, is an expert in immune monitoring and flow cytometry assays for the assessment of immune dysfunction. During this webinar, Dr. O’Gorman will discuss early results from labs around the world that have begun measuring CD4 and CD8 T-cell levels in peripheral blood as potential biomarkers for the prognosis of patients with COVID-19. 

Decreased CD4 and CD8 cells means more severe disease

Hospitals are observing that patients with severe cases of COVID-19 have significantly lower absolute numbers of CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocytes in their peripheral blood, compared to patients with mild or moderate disease. Low numbers of CD4 cells could potentially impact a patient’s ability to form antibodies against the virus, and low CD8 cells could diminish the patient’s ability to eliminate coronavirus from the body. 

Dr. O’Gorman will discuss the potential role for routine measurement of CD4 and CD8 T-cells—a process called immunophenotyping—in hospitalized COVID-19 patients participating in clinical trials. Immunophenotyping may provide a tool for prognostics stratification of disease, and potentially as a way to monitor response to treatment.

 

Register for webinar

Register for this Science/AAAS webinar here: https://www.sciencemag.org/custom-publishing/webinars/monitoring-immune-system-fight-covid-19-cd4-status-lymphopenia-and




Filters close

Showing results

1120 of 3446
Released: 29-Sep-2020 1:15 PM EDT
New genetic knowledge on the causes of severe COVID-19
Aarhus University

Worldwide, otherwise healthy adolescents and young people without underlying conditions are sometimes severely affected by COVID-19, with the viral infection in the worst cases quickly becoming life-threatening. But why is this happening?

Released: 29-Sep-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Can the common cold help protect you from COVID-19?
University of Rochester Medical Center

Seasonal colds are by all accounts no fun, but new research suggests the colds you've had in the past may provide some protection from COVID-19.

Released: 29-Sep-2020 12:25 PM EDT
Sensational COVID-19 communication erodes confidence in science
Cornell University

Scientists, policymakers and the media should acknowledge inherent uncertainties in epidemiological models projecting the spread of COVID-19 and avoid “catastrophizing” worst-case scenarios, according to new research from Cornell University.

Newswise:Video Embedded feeling-stressed-or-down-in-a-world-with-covid-try-this-writing-tool
VIDEO
Released: 29-Sep-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Feeling stressed or down in a world with COVID? Try this writing tool
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new expressive writing tool allows people to put their thoughts and feelings into words to help relieve stress and anxiety. Participants are given a prompt and directed to write for 5-10 minutes, expressing their deepest thoughts and feelings. A computer analyzes keywords and tone to provide feedback.

Newswise: Computer Model Shows How COVID-19 Could Lead to Runaway Inflammation
Released: 29-Sep-2020 9:30 AM EDT
Computer Model Shows How COVID-19 Could Lead to Runaway Inflammation
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

New study addresses a mystery first raised in March: Why do some people with COVID-19 develop severe inflammation? The research shows how the molecular structure and sequence of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein could be behind life-threatening inflammatory conditions MIS-C and cytokine storm.

Newswise: Follow Expert Guidelines to Keep Halloween Safe for Those with Allergies and Asthma
Released: 29-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Follow Expert Guidelines to Keep Halloween Safe for Those with Allergies and Asthma
American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)

A COVID-19 Halloween means additional precautions for kids with allergies and asthma.

Newswise: 244169_web.jpg
Released: 29-Sep-2020 8:25 AM EDT
COVID-19: Saliva tests could detect silent carriers
Hokkaido University

Testing self-collected saliva samples could offer an easy and effective mass testing approach for detecting asymptomatic COVID-19.


Showing results

1120 of 3446

close
1.02595