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Novel coronavirus: Experts in epidemics, economics, disease modeling, other fields available for interview

10-Mar-2020 11:10 AM EDT, by Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech experts on a variety of subjects are available for media interviews related to COVID-19 (commonly referred to as the novel coronavirus.)

Media experts:

Effect on Chinese and global GDP
-- Virginia Tech economics experts detail Chinese and worldwide GDP loss from Hubei province as COVID-19 rattles nations, markets

A Virginia Tech modeling study based on conservative assumptions shows losses for two months of lockdown for the Chinese GDP and worldwide GDP total, respectively, total $80 billion and $140 billion as people in affected regions have stopped going to work or socializing, and as flights are canceled and cross-country travel is restricted. (See experts' bio.) 

History of epidemics
-- Expert who studies history of epidemics: ‘Panic may be the worst possible response’

A professor who studies the history of international epidemics says the United States “should look to history for guidance on how to interpret news reports” about the spread of SARS-CoV-2, previously known as the 2019 novel coronavirus. (See expert bio)

Travel and tourism impacts
-- Travel and tourism already feeling impacts of virus, according to Virginia Tech travel expert 

The U.S. travel industry is already feeling the impact of the spread of coronavirus, both by the large and lucrative Chinese market, and by tourists and travelers overall who are becoming more skittish regarding travel, according to Virginia Tech expert Nancy McGehee. (See expert bio)

-- Travel expert urges caution when planning summer vacation

Many travelers are concerned about the impact of the coronavirus, staying safe and protecting their vacation investment. Virginia Tech travel and tourism expert Nancy McGehee is available for media interviews discussing dos and don’ts when it comes to planning summer vacations. (See expert bio)

Global supply chain impacts
-- Spread of coronavirus to impact the global economic supply chain, says expert

With China being a major supplier of goods to countries around the world, there will likely be short-term, but intense, disruptions to the global supply chain, says Virginia Tech expert Barbara Hoopes. (See expert bio)

-- Coronavirus disrupts global supply chain and production of U.S. consumer goods, says expert

“Smart watches, phones, video game consoles, computers, and embedded electronic components in larger goods may see the earliest impact," says Virginia Tech expert Barbara Hoopes. "These physically smaller, but higher-value goods are often handled on a just-in-time inventory basis due to shorter transit times. These are the components that will likely be missed first in both retail and production assembly operations in the U.S.” (See expert bio)

Economic effects
-- Perspectives on jittery financial markets

As the spread of the coronavirus continues to grab headlines, the uncertainty of financial markets leaves investors looking for answers. Virginia Tech’s Derek Klock encourages people not to make rash decisions in the middle of a panicky market. (See expert bio)

Origin of the virus
-- Wuhan coronavirus links origin to wild animals, says wildlife epidemiology expert 

“It’s not surprising that the coronavirus first identified in Wuhan has linkages with animals, especially wildlife,” said wildlife epidemiology expert Luis Escobar. “China has important traditions related to the consumption of wildlife products, which elevates the risks for emerging diseases. While other countries and cities have high population densities and massive amounts of tourists, we do not see epidemics like the SARS or Wuhan coronaviruses that emerged in China.” (See expert bio)

What the public can do
-- Proper handwashing technique is more important than ever, says Virginia Tech food safety expert

Experts stress that washing your hands thoroughly and often is the most crucial first step to preventing the spread of illness, especially for those in food service. (See expert bio)

Our studio

Virginia Tech's television and radio studio can broadcast live HD audio and video to networks, news outlets, and affiliates interviewing Virginia Tech faculty and staff. The university does not charge for use of its studio. Video is transmitted by LTN Global Communications, Skype, or file sharing (Dropbox, Google Drive, We-Transfer, etc.). Radio interviews can be transmitted by ISDN, Comrex, or file sharing. 

Additional scholars with expertise related to the global spread of the novel coronavirus will be added to this page (click here) as they become available.

More: Find additional Virginia Tech scholars with expertise in the news of the day.




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FLCCC Statement on the Irregular Actions of Public Health Agencies & the Disinformation Campaign Against Ivermectin
Front Line COVID-19 Critical Care Alliance (FLCCC Alliance)

FLCCC Alliance calls for whistleblower to step forward from within WHO, the FDA, the NIH, Merck, or Unitaid to counter this misrepresentation

Newswise: shutterstock_1724336896.jpg
Released: 13-May-2021 12:55 PM EDT
Kreuter receives $1.9 million in grants to increase vaccinations in St. Louis
Washington University in St. Louis

Matthew Kreuter, the Kahn Family Professor of Public Health at the Brown School, has received $1.9 million in grants to help increase COVID-19 vaccinations among Blacks in St. Louis City and County.

Released: 13-May-2021 11:35 AM EDT
COVID-19 mRNA Vaccines are Immunogenic in Pregnant and Lactating Women, Including Against Viral Variants
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a new study from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center researchers evaluated the immunogenicity of COVID-19 mRNA vaccines in pregnant and lactating women who received either the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines. They found that both vaccines triggered immune responses in pregnant and lactating women.

Released: 13-May-2021 10:30 AM EDT
Pandemic stigma: Foreigners, doctors wrongly targeted for COVID-19 spread in India
Monash University

The Indian public blamed foreigners, minority groups and doctors for the rapid spread of COVID-19 across the country during the first wave, due to misinformation, rumour and long-held discriminatory beliefs, according to an international study led by Monash University.

Released: 13-May-2021 9:15 AM EDT
28 Community Programs Receive Grants Through Penn Medicine CAREs Program
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Penn Medicine CAREs awarded grants to 28 projects, many of which aim to fill vast needs in the community created by the COVID-19 pandemic, while others seek to improve diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Released: 13-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
How to Win Over Vaccine Skeptics: Live Expert Panel for May 20, 3pm ET
Newswise

How to Win Over Vaccine Skeptics: Live Expert Panel for May 20, 3pm ET

Released: 13-May-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Dental procedures during pandemic are no riskier than a drink of water
Ohio State University

A new study’s findings dispel the misconception that patients and providers are at high risk of catching COVID-19 at the dentist’s office.

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VIDEO
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Lung Damage Not the Culprit for Post-COVID Exercise Limitations
American Physiological Society (APS)

A new study suggests the lungs may not be the main factor that reduce exercise ability in people recovering from severe COVID-19. Anemia and muscle dysfunction also play a role. The study is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology. It was chosen as an APSselect article for May.


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