Expert Pitch

Experts: Unprecedented Challenges Confront 2020 Election

University at Albany, State University of New York

ALBANY, N.Y. (Sept. 16, 2020) – COVID-19, A polarized electorate, absentee voting and questions about information security are just some of the potential challenges looming as the United States gears up for the 2020 Presidential election on Nov. 3.

The University at Albany has numerous experts who can handle a variety of election issues, including the Electoral College, the history of the Presidency and U.S. politics and election security.

UAlbany’s election experts include:

Carl Bon Tempo, associate professor of history, who teaches courses in 20th century American political history, public policy history, immigration history, and the history of American foreign policy. Bon Tempo's current research focuses on human rights politics and policies in the U.S. from the 1970's to the present.

Meghan Cook, program director, CTG UAlbany and adjunct professor, public administration and policy who is an expert on election security, information sharing and integration and cross-boundary collaborative work.

Michael Malbin, professor of political science, who specializes in campaigns and elections (especially the role of money in politics) as well as the politics of the U.S. Congress.

He teaches UAlbany's Semester in Washington and is executive director of the Campaign Finance Institute, an independent non-partisan think tank in Washington D.C.

Bruce Miroff, professor of political science and collins fellow, who teaches and writes on the American Presidency, American Political Development, American Political Theory, and Political Leadership.

Julie Novkov, professor of political science and women’s studies, whose research and teaching are situated at the intersection of law, history, US political development, and subordinated identity. She views law as both a system of political and social control and as a site for reform through activists’ pressure.

Stephan Stohler, assistant professor of political science, whose research and teaching interests are in the areas of public law and comparative politics, with a particular focus on the politics of rights. He completed Reconstructing Rights: Courts, Parties, and Equality Rights in India, South Africa, and the United States, which examines the relationship between courts and political parties when interpreting constitutional rights. At Rockefeller, Dr. Stohler teaches courses in public law. 

 

About the University at Albany:

A comprehensive public research university, the University at Albany-SUNY offers more than  120 undergraduate majors and minors and 125 master's, doctoral, and graduate certificate programs.  UAlbany is a leader among all New York State colleges and universities in such diverse fields as atmospheric and environmental sciences, business,  public health, health sciences, criminal justice, emergency preparedness, engineering and applied sciences, informatics, public administration, social welfare, and  sociology taught by an extensive roster of faculty experts. It also offers expanded academic and research opportunities for students through an affiliation with Albany Law School. With a curriculum enhanced by 600 study-abroad opportunities, UAlbany launches great careers.

 

###




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 3386
Released: 24-Sep-2020 11:45 AM EDT
How the Loss of Black-Owned Doctors’ Offices May Worsen Health Disparities
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers New Jersey Medical School experts discuss how the loss of Black-Owned doctors’ offices could affect primary care access in minority communities and what impact the COVID-19 pandemic is having in those communities.

Released: 24-Sep-2020 11:15 AM EDT
Preparing for asthma attacks during a pandemic
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Cooler weather, pumpkins, and falling leaves – all things that kick off the most wonderful time of year, the holiday season. But for asthma sufferers, this could mean trouble because experts see an increase in asthma attacks toward the end of September.

Newswise: Double-lung transplant for COVID-19 patient performed by team of UTHealth physicians
Released: 24-Sep-2020 11:10 AM EDT
Double-lung transplant for COVID-19 patient performed by team of UTHealth physicians
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Just 12 hours after undergoing a double-lung transplant, 70-year-old Francisco Medellin was sitting up in a chair pushing bike pedals – a seemingly simple act that was the culmination of hard work by a dedicated multidisciplinary team from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Newswise: Antibodies protect against wide range of influenza B virus strains
22-Sep-2020 11:50 AM EDT
Antibodies protect against wide range of influenza B virus strains
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers have identified two antibodies that protect mice against lethal infections of influenza B virus, report scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Together with an antibody that targets the other major kind of influenza viruses that infect people — influenza A — these antibodies potentially could form the basis of a broad-spectrum flu drug that could treat almost all flu cases.

Released: 24-Sep-2020 10:45 AM EDT
Uncovering a ‘suPAR’ culprit behind kidney injury in COVID-19
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new observational study finds patients in the hospital for COVID-19 have high levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR), an immune-derived pathogenic protein that is strongly predictive of kidney injury.

Released: 24-Sep-2020 10:35 AM EDT
Climate pledges 'like tackling COVID-19 without social distancing'
University of Exeter

Current global pledges to tackle climate change are the equivalent of declaring a pandemic without a plan for social distancing, researchers say.

Released: 24-Sep-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Rebound or Permanent Slump? Possible Impacts of US COVID-19 Fiscal Policies
University of Virginia Darden School of Business

Fiscal policy is a powerful tool to combat economic downturns, but the results depend on decreasing inequality, an imperative to the efficacy of fiscal multipliers. As COVID-19 cases rise, new research offers insights into which fiscal policies may bolster the economy — and the other options, which may have long-term ramifications.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 24-Sep-2020 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 24-Sep-2020 9:25 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-Sep-2020 2:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 24-Sep-2020 5:05 AM EDT
Many Americans continue to maintain unhealthy lifestyle habits during COVID-19; overeating, alcohol drinking and marijuana use increase while exercise declines, reports USC Center for the Digital Future
USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism

After more than six months of living in a pandemic, large percentages of Americans continue to indulge in unhealthy lifestyle habits, including overeating and increased use of alcohol and marijuana — all while many are exercising less, according to a study of the cultural impact of COVID-19 conducted by the USC Center for the Digital Future (CDF).

Newswise: Houston Methodist COVID-19 study shows rapid spread and potential for mutant viruses
Released: 23-Sep-2020 4:55 PM EDT
Houston Methodist COVID-19 study shows rapid spread and potential for mutant viruses
Houston Methodist

Molecular analysis of COVID-19’s powerful second wave in Houston shows a mutated virus strain linked to higher transmission and infection rates than the coronavirus strains that caused Houston’s first wave. Gene sequencing results from 5,085 COVID-positive patients tested at Houston Methodist since early March show a virus capable of adapting, surviving and thriving – making it more important than ever for physician scientists to understand its evolution as they work to discover effective vaccines and therapies.


Showing results

110 of 3386

close
0.95274