IUPUI institute combats COVID-19 at the nano level

Indiana University
23-Jul-2020 10:40 AM EDT, by Indiana University

Newswise — Copper, a metal commonly used throughout history for its antibacterial properties, is being utilized by researchers at IUPUI’s Integrated Nanosystems Development Institute to solve a problem very relevant today: making reusable face masks safer and more comfortable for daily use.

“We wondered how we could use our existing technology to turn something used in ancient times, like copper, into protection against COVID-19,” said Mangilal Agarwal, director of the Integrated Nanosystems Development Institute and professor of mechanical and energy engineering. “Any virus sitting on the surface that comes in contact with copper will be killed because of the antiviral properties.”

Agarwal and Hamid Dalir, associate professor, are applying a patented technology developed at IUPUI to manufacture reusable face masks using copper, a metal often used in the production of high-touch objects like doorknobs and handles. Their goal is to improve filter performance by trapping and disabling airborne virus particles.

“These masks have copper oxide applied at the nano level and would offer ultimate protection against virus risks like COVID-19,” Agarwal said. “Some cloth masks allow the small airborne particles to pass through, but with our technology, it would be close to 100% proof that you have the capability incorporated in the mask to deactivate the virus and improve filter performance.”

The technology – initially developed at IUPUI to make composite materials cheaper, lighter and stronger using nanomaterials – could be used to coat household masks with a layer of fabric protection inlaid with copper nanoparticles that disable virus particles as they reach the surface. The general public would be able to wear a reusable mask that offers the same superior level of protection as masks worn by healthcare providers, such as N95 masks.

“To make any fabric into a mask or filter, we have to provide the nanostructure, and we can put that nanostructure on a roll-to-roll printing machine with the fibers at nanoscale,” Agarwal said. “We are using electrospinning, using the electric field to spray the nanofibers onto the fabric.”

Agarwal and Dalir disclosed their technology to the Indiana University Innovation and Commercialization Office, and are looking to commercialize it through their startup. They plan to work with local companies manufacturing COVID-19 supplies under the Defense Protection Act.

Beyond face masks, the technology can be applied to other methods for fighting COVID-19, such as HEPA filters found in HVAC systems. Without good filters, Agarwal said, airborne virus particles could circulate between indoor areas. By applying the copper material to the filters, there could be virus free air circulation in buildings and hospitals.

“Our technology is good for masks and filters because we are not changing the manufacturing process,” Dalir said. “We just get the rolls of the mask and filter, manufacture and enhance it with copper-coated fabric and then use it as it would be used conventionally.”

Their company, Multiscale Integrated Technology Solutions, was recently selected as one of five Hoosier startup winners of the Elevate Nexus Statewide Pitch Competition, a program designed to support Indiana startups.

“Elevate Nexus is being funded by a grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration and the 21st Century Research and Technology Fund to help startups that have shown potential for commercialization to get connected with entrepreneurs to build on existing operational strategies," Dalir said. "What we're trying to do is raise the existing entrepreneurship support vehicles as well as attract investment in our startup at an earlier level so that we can have the opportunity to further grow and cultivate new investors as we de-risk our venture.”

The commercialization of their technology has the potential to greatly impact lives here in Indiana and around the world – providing a safe solution against the spread of COVID-19.

MEDIA CONTACT
Register for reporter access to contact details
Newswise: IUPUI institute combats COVID-19 at the nano level

Credit:

Caption: Mangilal Agarwal

Newswise: IUPUI institute combats COVID-19 at the nano level

Credit:

Caption: Hamid Dalir




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 3468
Released: 1-Oct-2020 9:40 AM EDT
Scientists at Texas Biomed develop new tool to aid in the development of SARS-CoV-2 antivirals and vaccines
Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Researchers apply a novel reverse genetics approach to create recombinant SARS-CoV-2San Antonio, Texas (October 1, 2020) – Researchers at Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed) recently published findings from an innovative SARS-CoV-2 study that will assist in the development of new vaccines and antivirals for COVID-19.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 9:30 AM EDT
COVID-19 Study Retractions Drive Research Transparency Partnership and Push for Increased Publication of Negative/Null Findings
Wolters Kluwer Health

Together, The Center for Biomedical Research Transparency (CBMRT), the American Heart Association (AHA) and Wolters Kluwer continue to address the issue of publication bias – and the importance of publishing research with negative findings – by launching the Null Hypothesis Initiative for all of the AHA's 12 peer-reviewed, scientific research journals.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 8:20 AM EDT
The GovLab and the IDB bring innovative ideas to Latin American government officials
New York University

The Governance Lab at New York University’s Tandon School of Engineering and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) share the results of the first two “Smarter Crowdsourcing in the Age of Coronavirus” online sessions

Released: 1-Oct-2020 8:15 AM EDT
How (and Why) Steak-umm Became a Social Media Phenomenon During the Pandemic
North Carolina State University

A new study outlines how a brand of frozen meat products took social media by storm – and what other brands can learn from the phenomenon.

Released: 1-Oct-2020 5:05 AM EDT
Relationships at home during the COVID-19 pandemic continue to improve, reports USC Center for the Digital Future
USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism

In spite of the stress from COVID-19 and stay-at-home restrictions, many Americans continue to say the relationships with their spouses and children have improved during the pandemic, a study by the USC Center for the Digital Future (CDF) has found.

28-Sep-2020 5:20 PM EDT
Leading Argonne Scientists Discuss Latest Research on Cybersecurity During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Argonne National Laboratory

Hear firsthand from two of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory’s scientific leaders how their research provides insight into cyber resilience and cybersecurity to help secure our nation’s information and systems.

Newswise: Computer Model Shows How COVID-19 Could Lead to Runaway Inflammation
Released: 30-Sep-2020 9:05 PM EDT
Computer Model Shows How COVID-19 Could Lead to Runaway Inflammation
Cedars-Sinai

New research from the University of Pittsburgh and Cedars-Sinai digs into the question: Why do some people with COVID-19 develop severe inflammation? The study is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Newswise: Cardiac Arrest, Poor Survival Rates Common in Sickest Patients with COVID-19
29-Sep-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Cardiac Arrest, Poor Survival Rates Common in Sickest Patients with COVID-19
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Study shows critically ill patients with the novel coronavirus have high rates of cardiac arrest and poor outcomes even after CPR, an effect most strongly seen in older patients.

Newswise: 244463_web.jpg
Released: 30-Sep-2020 3:45 PM EDT
Investigational COVID-19 vaccine well-tolerated, generates immune response in older adults
NIH, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

A Phase 1 trial of an investigational mRNA vaccine to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection has shown that the vaccine is well-tolerated and generates a strong immune response in older adults.

Newswise: Tufts University to lead $100M program to reduce risk of zoonotic viral spillover, spread
Released: 30-Sep-2020 2:10 PM EDT
Tufts University to lead $100M program to reduce risk of zoonotic viral spillover, spread
Tufts University

Tufts University will lead a $100 million, five-year program to understand and address threats posed by zoonotic viral diseases that can “spill over” from animals to humans, such as SARS-CoV-2, in an effort to reduce risk of infection, amplification, and spread, USAID announced today.


Showing results

110 of 3468

close
4.9379