Lockdown affords Aussie tennis players a unique advantage

18-Jan-2021 10:05 PM EST, by University of South Australia

Newswise — Australian-based tennis players may have a once-in-a-lifetime court advantage at the 2021 Australian Open as many of their international counterparts endure lockdown restrictions in Melbourne hotels.

According to exercise scientist, University of South Australia’s Professor Kevin Norton, international tennis players will be struggling to maintain their elite physiological and psychological fitness as the 14-day lockdown prevents them from maintaining their regular training schedule.

“One of the key tasks of conditioning staff is to periodise players’ training and recovery sessions across the competition season. This is not a simple science and involves a complex balance of overload time and appropriate recovery,” Professor Norton says.

“Severe changes to training schedules and environments, will significantly impact on players as they struggle to prevent physiological and biochemical decay.

“Training induces increases in blood volume and circulatory function to help maintain heart efficiency, regulate muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery, as well as help control body temperature. It also provides a reservoir of fluid for potential sweat, which is essential for body cooling during elite competition.

“After a few days of inactivity, most of these cardiovascular adaptations will be lost, exacerbated by the long-haul flights to Australia.

“Confinement may also cause a deterioration in players’ decision-making speed and accuracy, both of which are essential for the fast-paced nature of elite tennis.

“As fitness changes, so too do reaction times, even in short periods; players who are able to more quickly adapt and maintain their level of response post quarantine are likely to stand out.

“Perhaps most critical is the fact that players are now in controlled, air-conditioned rooms, 24 hours a day. Exposure to hot environments is essential for players to maintain enhanced capacity to regulate their bodies under very hot court conditions.

“Many players may now be underprepared to adjust to the extreme temperatures commonly seen in Melbourne at the Australian Open, and this could pose very serious health risks.”

Currently, 72 players are confined to their hotel rooms, unable to engage in their regular training.

Prof Norton says that resistance training and the ability to adapt will be critical for players in lockdown.

“As much as possible, players should be undertaking resistance training for all body parts in their rooms,” Prof Norton says.

“Not only will this help maintain muscle function, but it will lessen the micromuscular damage, inflammation and soreness that is inevitable upon resuming heavy training and competition.

“COVID-19 has presented unprecedented conditions for all of us; how players perform is yet to be seen. But, for those not in quarantine, this scenario could be a once-in-a-lifetime match point.”

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………



Filters close

Showing results

110 of 5849
Newswise:Video Embedded newswise-expert-panels-on-covid-19-pandemic-notable-excerpts-quotes-and-videos-available
VIDEO
Released: 18-Jun-2021 2:10 PM EDT
Newswise Expert Panels on COVID-19 Pandemic: Notable excerpts, quotes and videos available
Newswise

Newswise is hosting a series of Expert Panels discussion on unique aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic. This tip sheet includes some notable quotes from the panelists.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 23-Jun-2021 8:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 18-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Jun-2021 8:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise:Video Embedded virtual-event-for-june-17-11am-edt-covid-19-vaccines-and-male-fertility
VIDEO
Released: 18-Jun-2021 8:55 AM EDT
VIDEO AND TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE: Vaccines and Male Fertility Event for June 17, 2021
Newswise

This upcoming JAMA-published study examined whether the COVID-19 vaccine impacts male fertility.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 22-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 18-Jun-2021 8:30 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 18-Jun-2021 7:05 AM EDT
Teamwork saves lives: COVID-19 hospital network shares key findings to improve care
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Data sharing among 40 Michigan hospitals about the care and outcomes for thousands of inpatients with COVID-19 has led to reduced variation and findings that could inform care anywhere, including approaches for preventing blood clots and reducing overuse of antibiotics, as well as a risk prediction tool.

Released: 18-Jun-2021 7:05 AM EDT
One-third of older Americans delayed health care over COVID concerns
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Nearly one in three Americans between the ages of 50 and 80 put off an in-person appointment for medical care in 2020 because they were worried about exposure to the novel coronavirus, new national poll data show.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 4:15 PM EDT
UNC Researchers Lead Study of Diabetes Treatment of COVID-19 Patients
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Diabetes is one of the comorbidities most strongly associated with severe COVID-19 in the US, and data from early in the pandemic suggested individuals with type 2 diabetes faced twice the risk of death from COVID-19 and a greater risk of requiring hospitalization and intensive care. A new study shows best treatment options.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 4:10 PM EDT
Vaccination, Previous Infection, Protect Against COVID-19 gamma/P.1 Variant in Animal Model
University of Wisconsin-Madison

In a new study using variant virus recovered from one of the original travelers, researchers in the U.S. and Japan have found that vaccination with an mRNA vaccine induces antibody responses that would protect humans from infection with the gamma/P.1 variant.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 1:30 PM EDT
Hackensack Meridian Doctors, Student Help Establish Way to Prioritize Surgeries During COVID-19 lockdown
Hackensack Meridian Health

The MeNTS method of prioritizing surgeries during the height of pandemic, developed by University of Chicago, helped procedures continue during time of need

Released: 17-Jun-2021 12:55 PM EDT
‘Nanodecoy’ Therapy Binds and Neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 Virus
North Carolina State University

Nanodecoys made from human lung spheroid cells (LSCs) can bind to and neutralize SARS-CoV-2, promoting viral clearance and reducing lung injury in a macaque model of COVID-19.


Showing results

110 of 5849

close
1.3859