Expert Pitch
University of Delaware

Loneliness in the time of the coronavirus

18-Mar-2020 3:50 PM EDT, by University of Delaware

Dawn Fallik has talked about the social isolation that hits Gen Z and Millenials who spend so much time online.

https://schedule.sxsw.com/2019/events/PP103401

But now that social distancing is requiring less face-to-face contact, she is seeing that many people who live alone in their 40s, 50s, etc. are starting to feel the walls close in on them. 

She's available to Zoom/talk with journalists looking for insight into how people can cope and how they can prepare to get back into the world when things return to normal.

 




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Released: 6-Jul-2020 10:20 AM EDT
The Forum of International Respiratory Societies: We Must Continue to Be Vigilant to Control the Spread of COVID-19
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

COVID-19 cases continue to rise globally. Some countries are still dealing with large epidemics, while others are at various stages of reopening society. Many countries are fearful of a second wave of infection, as a consequence of restrictions being eased.

Released: 6-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Study confirms ‘classic’ symptoms of COVID-19
University of Sheffield

A persistent cough and fever have been confirmed as the most prevalent symptoms associated with COVID-19 according to the new international research

Newswise: Chaplains Tap Hospital Experience to Guide Faith Communities Through Pandemic
Released: 6-Jul-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Chaplains Tap Hospital Experience to Guide Faith Communities Through Pandemic
Cedars-Sinai

How does a religious congregation, which by definition brings groups of people close together in prayer and communion, navigate this tricky pandemic? Cedars-Sinai chaplains have some of the answers. With expertise as healthcare insiders, they have used their knowledge and experience from their hospital roles to help guide faith communities during this uncharted and unpredictable time.

Newswise: Harmful Microbes Found on Sewer Pipe Walls
Released: 6-Jul-2020 6:00 AM EDT
Harmful Microbes Found on Sewer Pipe Walls
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Can antibiotic-resistant bacteria escape from sewers into waterways and cause a disease outbreak? A new Rutgers study, published in the journal Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology, examined the microbe-laden “biofilms” that cling to sewer walls, and even built a simulated sewer to study the germs that survive within.

Released: 3-Jul-2020 10:25 AM EDT
Lack of lockdown increased COVID-19 deaths in Sweden
University of Virginia Health System

Sweden’s controversial decision not to lock down during COVID-19 produced more deaths and greater healthcare demand than seen in countries with earlier, more stringent interventions, a new analysis finds.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Researchers outline adapted health communications principles for the COVID-19 pandemic
CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy

The COVID-19 pandemic has introduced unique challenges for public health practitioners and health communicators that warrant an expansion of existing health communication principles to take into consideration.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Collectivism drives efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19
University of Kent

Research from the University of Kent has found that people who adopt a collectivist mindset are more likely to comply with social distancing and hygiene practices to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Tiny mineral particles are better vehicles for promising gene therapy
University of Wisconsin-Madison

University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers have developed a safer and more efficient way to deliver a promising new method for treating cancer and liver disorders and for vaccination — including a COVID-19 vaccine from Moderna Therapeutics that has advanced to clinical trials with humans.

Newswise: Newer variant of COVID-19–causing virus dominates global infections
Released: 2-Jul-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Newer variant of COVID-19–causing virus dominates global infections
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Research out today in the journal Cell shows that a specific change in the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus virus genome, previously associated with increased viral transmission and the spread of COVID-19, is more infectious in cell culture.

Newswise: From Wuhan to San Diego—How a mutation on the novel coronavirus has come to dominate the globe
Released: 2-Jul-2020 12:05 PM EDT
From Wuhan to San Diego—How a mutation on the novel coronavirus has come to dominate the globe
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Two variants of the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), called G614 and D614, were circulating in mid-March. A new study shows that the G version of the virus has come to dominate cases around the world. They report that this mutation does not make the virus more deadly, but it does help the virus copy itself, resulting in a higher viral load, or "titer," in patients.


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