Mount Sinai Launches COVID-19 App to Track Spread of Virus Across New York City

STOP COVID NYC Seeks Participation to Understand Transmission and Enhance Medical Response

Newswise — (New York, NY – April 1, 2020) – A team of data scientists, physicians, and engineers across the Mount Sinai Health System has come together to launch STOP COVID NYC, a web-based app to capture the symptoms and spread of COVID-19 in New York City—currently the epicenter of the nation’s largest outbreak. The group is seeking citywide participation to survey the spread of COVID-19 and enhance medical response to the pandemic.

The web app, now available by texting “COVID” to 64722, allows all Mount Sinai patients and city residents to enroll in the tool to monitor their symptoms. Users complete an initial survey with questions about demographics, exposure, and symptom history, followed by short daily surveys about their symptoms through text messages sent to their phones.

“The new web app will track the spread of the virus throughout our New York City community, helping medical professionals and government officials to provide appropriate responses to deal with the crisis,” said Laura Huckins, PhD, Assistant Professor of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, and Psychiatry, at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and a leader of this project. “To do this well, we need our whole city to help, not just those in hospitals or with access to health care. Everyone is included, and everyone can help. Capturing citywide coronavirus data from residents before, during, and after they become ill could help to reduce the pressure on medical resources and contribute to slowing the spread.”

Data collected from the survey could alert health care providers about growing clusters of outbreaks in specific communities across the five boroughs, helping to better allocate resources for rising numbers of patients. In broader global and public health efforts, the results from the exposure surveys could guide long-term research about factors affecting the spread of the virus and jumpstart enrollment for future clinical trials and studies for treatments.

“Most data used to guide clinical decisions for COVID-19 have been generated in China, but with New York City among the cities with the largest number of cases—a number that continues to grow—we see a critical and urgent need to understand more about the clinical course of the disease,” said Girish Nadkarni, MD, a team lead, Clinical Director of the Hasso Plattner Institute for Digital Health, faculty member in the Charles Bronfman Institute of Personalized Medicine, and Assistant Professor of Medicine (Nephrology) at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “This is a unique opportunity to collect data in a diverse population during an outbreak surge, which could provide powerful predictions of the clinical outcomes of our most vulnerable patients.”

The systemwide effort to develop the app includes expertise from several medical disciplines, including the Departments of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Medicine, Pathology, and Radiology, plus the Hasso Plattner Institute for Digital Health, the Icahn Institute for Data Science and Genomic Technology, The Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, the Mount Sinai Data Office, and the Biomedical Engineering and Imaging Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine. Early developments of some of this work were a result of collaborations with Charite University Hospital in Berlin and Data4Life gGmbH.

Paul O’Reilly, PhD, a team lead and Associate Professor of Genetics and Genomic Sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, said all residents of New York City are encouraged to use the self-reporting app. “A really important aim of our survey is for the entire community to participate and share what they are experiencing in real time, so we can understand how the virus is affecting everyone,” Dr. O’Reilly said. “We want feedback from as many people as possible, including those who are healthy and sick, young and old. This is a survey about New Yorkers, for New Yorkers.”

About the Mount Sinai Health System

The Mount Sinai Health System is New York City's largest academic medical system, encompassing eight hospitals, a leading medical school, and a vast network of ambulatory practices throughout the greater New York region. Mount Sinai is a national and international source of unrivaled education, translational research and discovery, and collaborative clinical leadership ensuring that we deliver the highest quality care—from prevention to treatment of the most serious and complex human diseases. The Health System includes more than 7,200 physicians and features a robust and continually expanding network of multispecialty services, including more than 400 ambulatory practice locations throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, and Long Island. The Mount Sinai Hospital is ranked No. 14 on U.S. News & World Report's “Honor Roll” of the Top 20 Best Hospitals in the country and the Icahn School of Medicine as one of the Top 20 Best Medical Schools in country. Mount Sinai Health System hospitals are consistently ranked regionally by specialty and our physicians in the top 1% of all physicians nationally by U.S. News & World Report.

For more information, visit https://www.mountsinai.org or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 1994
Newswise: COVID-19 Healthcare Coalition Launches COVID-19 Decision Support Dashboard
Released: 29-May-2020 9:00 AM EDT
COVID-19 Healthcare Coalition Launches COVID-19 Decision Support Dashboard
COVID-19 Healthcare Coalition

The new COVID-19 Decision Support Dashboard synthesizes large amounts of complex, essential data into easy-to-use key findings for public and private-sector leaders navigating the “reopening” of communities and businesses.

Released: 29-May-2020 6:50 AM EDT
Those with IDD more likely to die from COVID-19, study shows
Syracuse University

A new study published recently in ScienceDirect by researchers from Syracuse University and SUNY Upstate Medical University shows that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are more likely to die from COVID-19 than those without IDD.

Newswise: Invention by a Finnish start-up speeds up coronavirus testing
Released: 29-May-2020 6:25 AM EDT
Invention by a Finnish start-up speeds up coronavirus testing
Aalto University

An Aalto University spinoff company has come up with a way to use existing lab microscopes in a completely new and much more effective way with their innovation of nanocoated glass. While this is very relevant to covid19 research, it holds great promise for many other viruses and diseases

Newswise: Tourism: what’s our new normal?
Released: 29-May-2020 6:20 AM EDT
Tourism: what’s our new normal?
University of South Australia

After months of lockdown, it’s no surprise that people are itching to get out and about. But with ongoing debates about how and when to open Australia’s state and territory borders, it’s hard to know what to expect.

Newswise: Calibrated approach to AI and deep learning models could more reliably diagnose and treat disease
Released: 29-May-2020 6:05 AM EDT
Calibrated approach to AI and deep learning models could more reliably diagnose and treat disease
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

In a recent preprint (available through Cornell University’s open access website arXiv), a team led by a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory computer scientist proposes a novel deep learning approach aimed at improving the reliability of classifier models designed for predicting disease types from diagnostic images, with an additional goal of enabling interpretability by a medical expert without sacrificing accuracy. The approach uses a concept called confidence calibration, which systematically adjusts the model’s predictions to match the human expert’s expectations in the real world.

Newswise: Researchers Develop Experimental Rapid COVID-19 Test Using Innovative Nanoparticle Technique
Released: 28-May-2020 6:35 PM EDT
Researchers Develop Experimental Rapid COVID-19 Test Using Innovative Nanoparticle Technique
University of Maryland Medical Center

Scientists from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) developed an experimental diagnostic test for COVID-19 that can visually detect the presence of the virus in 10 minutes. It uses a simple assay containing plasmonic gold nanoparticles to detect a color change when the virus is present. The test does not require the use of any advanced laboratory techniques, such as those commonly used to amplify DNA, for analysis. The authors published their work last week in the American Chemical Society’s nanotechnology journal ACS Nano.

Released: 28-May-2020 6:05 PM EDT
Tackling airborne transmission of COVID-19 indoors
University of Surrey

Preventing airborne transmission of Covid-19 should be the next front of the battle against the virus, argue experts from the University of Surrey.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 1-Jun-2020 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 28-May-2020 5:40 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 1-Jun-2020 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 28-May-2020 5:10 PM EDT
Mental health outcomes among health care workers during COVID-19 pandemic in Italy
JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety and insomnia among health care workers in Italy during the COVID-19 pandemic are reported in this observational study.


Showing results

110 of 1994

close
0.91116