Mouthwash Could Be a Promising Weapon in the Fight Against Coronavirus Transmission

Researchers urge immediate study of oral rinses as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread
American Physiological Society (APS)

Newswise — Rockville, Md. (May 14, 2020)—Readily available dental mouthwashes have the potential to destroy the lipid envelope of coronaviruses, combating virus replication in the mouth and throat. The findings are presented in a new review article published today in Function, concluding that there is an urgent need to test the effectiveness of this approach in clinical trials.

“Emerging studies increasingly demonstrate the importance of the throat and salivary glands as sites of virus replication and transmission in early COVID-19 disease. SARS-CoV-2 is an enveloped virus, characterised by an outer lipid membrane derived from the host cell from which it buds. While it is highly sensitive to agents that disrupt lipid bio-membranes, there has been no discussion about the potential role of oral rinsing in preventing transmission,” the research team wrote.

“Here, we review known mechanisms of viral lipid membrane disruption by widely available dental mouthwash components that include ethanol, chlorhexidine, cetylpyridinium chloride, hydrogen peroxide and povidone-iodine. We also assess existing formulations for their potential ability to disrupt the SARS-CoV-2 lipid envelope, based on their concentrations of these agents, and conclude that several deserve clinical evaluation.”

Notably, the lipid envelope does not vary when viruses mutate. This means that if the strategy is deemed effective, it should still work against any new coronavirus strains that emerge.

A multidisciplinary international team of scientists and clinicians led by researchers at the Cardiff University School of Medicine co-authored the Evidence Review, while industry partners provided global formulation information. This article is the first of a new style review article, with conclusions entirely based on precisely referenced original peer-reviewed articles. This is an important feature of Function, the newest publication in the American Physiological Society’s family of journals.

About Function

Function provides a high-caliber, broad-spectrum open access platform for researchers to publish their major advances in basic, translational and clinical sciences. From organelles to organisms, Function seeks papers that contribute to defining the mechanistic basis of living systems in health and disease. Published by the American Physiological Society (APS), Function aims to publish ground-breaking research that extends physiological understanding of biological function and the changes associated with disease states. The journal launched in 2020 and is now accepting submissions.

About APS

Physiology is the study of how molecules, cells, tissues and organs function in health and disease. Established in 1887, the American Physiological Society (APS) was the first U.S. society in the biomedical sciences field. The Society represents 9,000 members and publishes 16 peer-reviewed journals with a worldwide readership.

 




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 3821
Newswise: UC Davis Health announces Post-COVID-19 Clinic for long-haul patients
Released: 28-Oct-2020 5:20 PM EDT
UC Davis Health announces Post-COVID-19 Clinic for long-haul patients
UC Davis Health

UC Davis Health is one of only a handful of health systems in the U.S. to launch a Post-COVID-19 Clinic to care for long-haul COVID patients whose symptoms go on and on, sometimes for months, with no clear explanation or avenue for treatment.

Newswise: Most People Mount a Strong Antibody Response to 
SARS-CoV-2 That Does Not Decline Rapidly
Released: 28-Oct-2020 5:20 PM EDT
Most People Mount a Strong Antibody Response to SARS-CoV-2 That Does Not Decline Rapidly
Mount Sinai Health System

The vast majority of individuals infected with mild-to-moderate COVID 19 mount a robust antibody response that is relatively stable for at least five months, according to research conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published October 28, in the journal Science.

Newswise: 45a1c2a0-c0a4-11ea-b53e-cb3f2ed770b1.jpg
Released: 28-Oct-2020 4:00 PM EDT
Investigator on the AtraZeneca vaccine trial will take questions at Live Event on Oct. 29, 3PM
Keck Medicine of USC

Dr. Edward Jones-Lopez, joins a Newswise Live Expert Panel on Thursday Oct. 29, from 3-4 PM EDT to discuss the AstraZenea COVID-19 vaccine trial.

Released: 28-Oct-2020 4:00 PM EDT
"Third spike" in COVID-19 cases, plus the vaccine trials: Live Expert Panel for October 29, 3PM EDT
Newswise

"Third spike" in COVID-19 cases, plus the vaccine trials: Live Expert Panel for October 29, 3PM EDT

Newswise: Oak Ridge National Laboratory industry collaboration enables job growth, N95 mask production in Florida
Released: 28-Oct-2020 2:15 PM EDT
Oak Ridge National Laboratory industry collaboration enables job growth, N95 mask production in Florida
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

A collaboration between the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory and a Florida-based medical device manufacturer has led to the addition of 500 jobs in the Miami area to support the mass production of N95 respirator masks.

Released: 28-Oct-2020 1:55 PM EDT
What EEGs tell us about COVID-19 and the brain
Baylor College of Medicine

Throughout the pandemic, healthcare workers have seen more than just the lungs affected by COVID-19. Doctors have reported neurological complications including stroke, headache and seizures, but the information is limited to a number of individual reports that are not reflective of a larger population.

Released: 28-Oct-2020 1:50 PM EDT
A new playbook: COVID-19, athletes' hearts and return to play
Massachusetts General Hospital

Reports have indicated that COVID-19 may cause heart damage in hospitalized patients with severe cases of the disease, but it's unclear whether cardiac injury also occurs in infected patients who are asymptomatic or experience only mild symptoms.

Newswise: 0815UCI20052-1069-768x512.jpg
Released: 28-Oct-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Antibody screening finds COVID-19 nearly 7 times more prevalent in O.C. than thought
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., Oct. 28, 2020 — Testing a representative sample of Orange County residents for a wide range of coronavirus antibodies, University of California, Irvine researchers found that 11.5 percent of them have antibodies for COVID-19, in contrast to previous estimates of less than 2 percent. Latino and low-income residents had the highest prevalence of SARS-CoV-02 antibodies with rates of 17 percent and 15 percent, respectively.

Released: 28-Oct-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Researchers find confusion over masks for wildfire, COVID-19 crises
Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

To mask or not to mask - and which mask to use? With public health guidance about masks in the United States confused by political hedging, clarity around mask use is increasingly important, especially as the western U.S. battles the twin crises of wildfire smoke and COVID-19.


Showing results

110 of 3821

close
1.03857