University of Illinois at Chicago

Naloxone access law in Pennsylvania falls short

UIC study finds many Philadelphia pharmacies fail to implement state’s standing order

Newswise — A new study from researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago finds that only one-third of pharmacies in Philadelphia carry naloxone nasal spray, a medication used to rapidly counter the effects of opioid overdose, and that many of the pharmacies that do carry the drug require patients to have a physician’s prescription for it.

Pennsylvania has one of the highest rates of death by opioid overdose in the U.S. and was the first state to implement a statewide standing order for the drug, which is commonly known as Narcan. The law was intended to increase the availability of the potentially life-saving opioid antidote by allowing pharmacists to dispense the drug to anyone.

However, findings from this study suggest that Pennsylvania’s naloxone access law, which was enacted in 2015, is not fully implemented — putting many communities at risk.

The study, which is published in JAMA Network Open, relied on primary data collected by phone from nearly all of Philadelphia’s community pharmacies in 2017.

Senior author Dima Qato, associate professor of pharmacy systems, outcomes and policy at UIC’s College of Pharmacy, says that these findings provide evidence that despite statewide efforts to improve community access to naloxone, unnecessary barriers remain — including for people who may benefit most from the drug.

“Efforts to strengthen the implementation of naloxone access laws, including statewide standing orders, which are considered the least restrictive, are warranted,” Qato said. “Particularly for pharmacies located in communities with the highest rates of death due to opioid overdose.”

Of the 418 pharmacies included in the study, only 34.2% had naloxone nasal spray in stock. Qato and her colleagues found that the drug was more likely to be available in chain stores, compared with independent stores; it was less likely to be available in stores located in predominately minority neighborhoods, compared with predominately white neighborhoods; and, most significantly, it was less likely to be available in areas with high rates of opioid overdose deaths, or OODs, compared with areas of low OODs.

Nearly 40% of the pharmacies that did stock the drug asked people to provide a prescription before making it available and many also required people to be older than 18.

“Despite the potential for naloxone access laws to prevent fatal opioid overdoses, our data shows that the laws are not enough. Policies need to be enforced and pharmacies need to be aware of and held accountable for implementing them,” Qato said.

“Recent developments in Philadelphia are heartening — including new legislation requiring pharmacies to stock naloxone and to post a sign notifying shoppers that it is stocked,” said Jenny Guadamuz, a UIC Ph.D. candidate who collaborated on the study. “Our study provides an important baseline to evaluate continued efforts to improve naloxone access and address OODs. Pharmacies can be fined $250 for each day they are not in compliance of the law. Now, the question is, will the city enforce the law?”

“While mandating pharmacies to stock naloxone is important, our findings suggest policies that ensure pharmacies are not imposing unnecessary dispensing restrictions, including individual prescription or age requirements, are also critical,” Qato said. “Naloxone access laws may fail to prevent opioid overdose deaths if they are not enforced.”

Co-authors on the study include Tanya Chaudhri of UIC, Dr. G. Caleb Alexander of Johns Hopkins and Dr. Rebecca Trotzky-Sirr of the University of Southern California at Los Angeles. The authors noted financial disclosures relevant to the study.

SEE ORIGINAL STUDY




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 4581
Newswise: Lockdown affords Aussie tennis players a unique advantage
Released: 18-Jan-2021 10:05 PM EST
Lockdown affords Aussie tennis players a unique advantage
University of South Australia

Australian-based tennis players may have a once-in-a-lifetime court advantage at the 2021 Australian Open as many of their international counterparts endure lockdown restrictions in Melbourne hotels.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 21-Jan-2021 12:00 AM EST Released to reporters: 18-Jan-2021 8:05 PM EST

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-Jan-2021 12:00 AM EST The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 18-Jan-2021 5:05 PM EST
FLCCC Alliance issues public response to new NIH recommendation on the use of ivermectin
Front Line COVID-19 Critical Care Alliance (FLCCC Alliance)

The Front Line COVID-19 Critical Care Alliance (FLCCC) has issued a public response to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) regarding the NIH COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines Panel’s “neither for nor against” recommendation for the use of ivermectin in the treatment of COVID-19.

Newswise: UCLA Researcher’s Team Finds Common Blood Pressure Medications do not Increase COVID-19 Risk
Released: 18-Jan-2021 12:05 PM EST
UCLA Researcher’s Team Finds Common Blood Pressure Medications do not Increase COVID-19 Risk
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

Dr. Marc Suchard, of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, co-led international research team looking at two widely used types of blood pressure drugs.

Newswise: UCLA Fielding School of Public Health Researchers Say Mask Mandates Could add $1 Trillion to the U.S. GDP
Released: 18-Jan-2021 12:05 PM EST
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health Researchers Say Mask Mandates Could add $1 Trillion to the U.S. GDP
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

The team, including UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professors Anne Rimoin and Christina Ramirez, found that near-universal adoption of nonmedical masks in public, combined with complementary public health measures, could successfully eliminate spread of the infection. and add $1 Trillion to the U.S. GDP.

Released: 18-Jan-2021 10:45 AM EST
Mount Sinai Researchers Build Models Using Machine Learning Technique to Enhance Predictions of COVID-19 Outcomes
Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai researchers have published one of the first studies using federated learning to examine electronic health records to better predict how COVID-19 patients will progress.

Newswise:Video Embedded pregnant-women-should-consider-taking-the-covid-19-vaccine
VIDEO
Released: 18-Jan-2021 7:50 AM EST
Pregnant women should consider taking the COVID-19 vaccine.
University of Washington School of Medicine

f pregnant individuals catch COVID they will generally get sicker than non-pregnant individuals. They also more commonly end up on ECMO [heart-lung support], in the ICU or on ventilators.

Newswise: Have allergies? Worried about COVID-19 vaccine? Don’t be.
Released: 18-Jan-2021 7:40 AM EST
Have allergies? Worried about COVID-19 vaccine? Don’t be.
UW Medicine

Even people who have experienced severe allergic reactions to food, latex, pets, pollen, or bee stings should get the coronavirus vaccine, UW Medicine allergy and infectious disease experts say.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 5:40 PM EST
Research Links Social Isolation to COVID-19 Protocol Resistance
Humboldt State University

As health officials continue to implore the public to wear masks and practice social distancing, recent research by Humboldt State University Psychology Professor Amber Gaffney provides key insights into connections between social isolation, conspiratorial thinking, and resistance to COVID-19 protocols.

Newswise: Rapid blood test identifies COVID-19 patients at high risk of severe disease
Released: 15-Jan-2021 5:35 PM EST
Rapid blood test identifies COVID-19 patients at high risk of severe disease
Washington University in St. Louis

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that a relatively simple and rapid blood test can predict which patients with COVID-19 are at highest risk of severe complications or death. The blood test measures levels of mitochondrial DNA, which normally resides inside the energy factories of cells. Mitochondrial DNA spilling out of cells and into the bloodstream is a sign that a particular type of violent cell death is taking place in the body.


Showing results

110 of 4581

close
1.06527