Expert Pitch
Wichita State University

National airline quality expert comments on potential impact of COVID-19 on air travel

2-Mar-2020 2:20 PM EST, by Wichita State University

Dean Headley, co-author of the national Airline Quality Rating from Wichita State University, says public concerns over COVID-19 will mostly negatively affect air travel internationally, but will certainly have some impact on domestic air travel as the virus spreads. 

“At this point, the biggest impact is on international travel,” said Headley. “Truth be told, there’s a silver lining for those travelers who continue to fly domestically. If the coronavirus results in a reduction in passengers flying commercially, airline performance will likely be better. History shows that fewer travelers helps the system perform better.  Of course, the downside for the airlines is they’ll lose money because fewer people are traveling.” 

Initially, Headley says the large US airports will likely be affected more than smaller regional airports because they handle most of the international traffic. The hub and spoke system of air travel also presents challenges to all airports in trying to contain the virus.

Leisure travelers are in the process of making their summer plans now, so depending on the spread of the virus domestically, there could be a reduction in leisure travel for the summer, according to Headley. “There’s a lot of complex issues, especially concerning human nature and what people are willing to do despite warnings in terms of air travel and the community spread of the virus,” said Headley.

Looking back, the events of 9/11 come to mind regarding when air travel was considered a risky choice.  At this point, Headley says the airline industry shouldn’t suffer as much from COVID-19 as it did following 9/11.

“It took a couple of years for domestic air travel to recover from 9/11,” said Headley. “The coronavirus is scary, but I don’t think it scares the public like 9/11 did. A lot will depend though on what shape the virus takes over the next few months. Airlines and consumers alike should learn from this and be better prepared for next year and the year after that. Unless the coronavirus becomes more widespread in this country, the impact isn’t going to be as serious as post 9/11.”

# # # # #

 

Wichita State is distinctive for opening pathways to applied learning, applied research and career opportunities, alongside unsurpassed classroom, laboratory and online education. The university's beautiful 330-acre main campus is a supportive, rapidly expanding learn-work-live-play environment, where students gain knowledge and credentials to prepare for fulfilling lives and careers. Students enjoy a wide selection of day, evening and summer courses in more than 200 areas of study at the main campus and other locations throughout the metro area and online. WSU's approximately 16,000 students come from every state in the U.S. and more than 100 other countries. Wichita State's Innovation Campus is an interconnected community of partnership buildings, laboratories and mixed-use areas where students, faculty, staff, entrepreneurs and businesses have access to the university's vast resources and technology. For more information, follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/wichitastate and Facebook at www.facebook.com/wichita.state.




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 4578
Newswise: UCLA Researcher’s Team Finds Common Blood Pressure Medications do not Increase COVID-19 Risk
Released: 18-Jan-2021 12:05 PM EST
UCLA Researcher’s Team Finds Common Blood Pressure Medications do not Increase COVID-19 Risk
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

Dr. Marc Suchard, of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, co-led international research team looking at two widely used types of blood pressure drugs.

Newswise: UCLA Fielding School of Public Health Researchers Say Mask Mandates Could add $1 Trillion to the U.S. GDP
Released: 18-Jan-2021 12:05 PM EST
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health Researchers Say Mask Mandates Could add $1 Trillion to the U.S. GDP
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

The team, including UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professors Anne Rimoin and Christina Ramirez, found that near-universal adoption of nonmedical masks in public, combined with complementary public health measures, could successfully eliminate spread of the infection. and add $1 Trillion to the U.S. GDP.

Released: 18-Jan-2021 10:45 AM EST
Mount Sinai Researchers Build Models Using Machine Learning Technique to Enhance Predictions of COVID-19 Outcomes
Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai researchers have published one of the first studies using federated learning to examine electronic health records to better predict how COVID-19 patients will progress.

Newswise:Video Embedded pregnant-women-should-consider-taking-the-covid-19-vaccine
VIDEO
Released: 18-Jan-2021 7:50 AM EST
Pregnant women should consider taking the COVID-19 vaccine.
University of Washington School of Medicine

f pregnant individuals catch COVID they will generally get sicker than non-pregnant individuals. They also more commonly end up on ECMO [heart-lung support], in the ICU or on ventilators.

Newswise: Have allergies? Worried about COVID-19 vaccine? Don’t be.
Released: 18-Jan-2021 7:40 AM EST
Have allergies? Worried about COVID-19 vaccine? Don’t be.
UW Medicine

Even people who have experienced severe allergic reactions to food, latex, pets, pollen, or bee stings should get the coronavirus vaccine, UW Medicine allergy and infectious disease experts say.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 5:40 PM EST
Research Links Social Isolation to COVID-19 Protocol Resistance
Humboldt State University

As health officials continue to implore the public to wear masks and practice social distancing, recent research by Humboldt State University Psychology Professor Amber Gaffney provides key insights into connections between social isolation, conspiratorial thinking, and resistance to COVID-19 protocols.

Newswise: Rapid blood test identifies COVID-19 patients at high risk of severe disease
Released: 15-Jan-2021 5:35 PM EST
Rapid blood test identifies COVID-19 patients at high risk of severe disease
Washington University in St. Louis

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that a relatively simple and rapid blood test can predict which patients with COVID-19 are at highest risk of severe complications or death. The blood test measures levels of mitochondrial DNA, which normally resides inside the energy factories of cells. Mitochondrial DNA spilling out of cells and into the bloodstream is a sign that a particular type of violent cell death is taking place in the body.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 2:55 PM EST
COVID-19 deaths really are different. But best practices for ICU care should still apply, studies suggest.
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

COVID-19 deaths are indeed different from other lung failure deaths, according to two recent studies, with 56% of COVID-19 patients dying primarily from the lung damage caused by the virus, compared with 22% of those whose lungs fail due to other causes. But, the researchers conclude, the kind of care needed to help sustain people through the worst cases of all forms of lung failure is highly similar, and just needs to be fine-tuned.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 2:50 PM EST
45% of adults over 65 lack online medical accounts that could help them sign up for COVID-19 vaccinations
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

As the vaccination of older adults against COVID-19 begins across the country, new poll data suggests that many of them don’t yet have access to the “patient portal” online systems that could make it much easier for them to schedule a vaccination appointment. In all, 45% of adults aged 65 to 80 had not set up an account with their health provider’s portal system.


Showing results

110 of 4578

close
1.27322