American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA)

Need surgery? Here’s why regional anesthesia is safer than general anesthesia during the coronavirus pandemic

Experts say regional anesthesia helps to keep everyone in the operating room safer.

Newswise — If you don’t have COVID-19, you probably want to stay as far away from a hospital as possible right now. However, the fact is that some people still need emergency surgery. If you or a loved one are in this situation – for any reason – you should know that experts say regional anesthesia may be better than general anesthesia to keep everyone in the operating room safe.

During general anesthesia, the patient is unconscious and connected to a ventilator (breathing machine). In contrast, regional anesthesia involves numbing the specific region of the body that requires surgery – such as an arm or a knee. With regional anesthesia, patients can still be sedated (asleep) and won’t feel anything. The benefits, though, have to do with the safety of everyone in the room during the surgery and the potential for fewer complications after surgery.

General anesthesia can require a tube be placed in the patient’s airway or trachea, which leads to what is called aerosol generation. If the patient has any respiratory infection, the health care team can be exposed to the aerosols during insertion or removal of this breathing tube. Research has found that the odds of transmitting infection during breathing tube insertion is 6.6 times higher than without it. Regional anesthesia is also associated with a lower the risk of postoperative complications. For a patient with COVID-19, these risks are likely to be more significant due to ongoing chest infection.

For these and other reasons, physicians with the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) and the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy (ESRA) recommend patients receive regional anesthesia whenever possible during the COVID outbreak.

The two groups have developed a set of recommendations to aid healthcare providers in caring for patients during COVID-19, which are available on the societies’ websites.

Patients and their loved ones are urged to ask their physicians about the possibility of receiving regional anesthesia rather than general anesthesia. Guidance authors Vishal Uppal, MBBS, FRCA, EDRA, and Hari K. P. Kalagara, MD, FCARCSI, EDRA, are available for interviews on how these recommendations affect patients.

Dr. Uppal is an assistant professor and director of the Regional Anesthesia Fellowship Program; Department of Anesthesia, Pain Management and Perioperative Medicine, Dalhousie University. Dr. Kalagara is an assistant professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham with a special interest in regional anesthesia. Both are frequent faculty members and actively involved in ASRA.

 

 

 



Filters close

Showing results

110 of 5835
Newswise: Pandemic-Era Crowdfunding More Common, Successful in Affluent Communities
Released: 16-Jun-2021 5:05 PM EDT
Pandemic-Era Crowdfunding More Common, Successful in Affluent Communities
University of Washington

A new University of Washington study of requests and donations to the popular crowdfunding site GoFundMe, along with Census data, shows stark inequities in where the money went and how much was donated.

Newswise: In Show of COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence, 96% of America’s Ophthalmologists Already Vaccinated
Released: 16-Jun-2021 3:50 PM EDT
In Show of COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence, 96% of America’s Ophthalmologists Already Vaccinated
American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO)

The American Academy of Ophthalmology is calling on its members to continue to build confidence in COVID-19 vaccines and encourage people to get vaccinated, including their staff.

Newswise: Biophysical Study Sheds Light on Potentially Druggable Process of SARS-CoV-2 Replication
Released: 16-Jun-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Biophysical Study Sheds Light on Potentially Druggable Process of SARS-CoV-2 Replication
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

This study investigates how the nucleocapsid protein, or N protein, of the SARS-CoV-2 virus packages the viral genome.

Newswise: ‘Wonder material’ can be used to detect COVID-19 quickly, accurately
Released: 16-Jun-2021 11:55 AM EDT
‘Wonder material’ can be used to detect COVID-19 quickly, accurately
University of Illinois at Chicago

Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have successfully used graphene — one of the strongest, thinnest known materials — to detect the SARS-CoV-2 virus in laboratory experiments.

Newswise: UCLA-led Research Finds Connections Between Air Quality and COVID Vulnerability
Released: 16-Jun-2021 11:05 AM EDT
UCLA-led Research Finds Connections Between Air Quality and COVID Vulnerability
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

Even as governments across the United States consider lifting mask mandates and relaxing preventative measures as vaccination numbers creep up, new research from a UCLA-led team has found that such basic techniques significantly reduce the risk of getting COVID-19. In addition, the research found that U.S. counties with higher exposures to poor air quality, historically, saw higher county-level COVID-19 mortality rates in 2020.

Newswise: Story Tips from Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Released: 16-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Story Tips from Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Johns Hopkins Medicine

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE: - Stressed About “Returning to Normal”? Here Are Tips to Ease Into the Transition - Be Your Brother’s Keeper: Steps for Faith-Based Communities to Reopen Safely

Newswise: Virtual Event For June 17, 11AM EDT: COVID-19 Vaccines and Male Fertility
Released: 16-Jun-2021 8:55 AM EDT
Virtual Event For June 17, 11AM EDT: COVID-19 Vaccines and Male Fertility
Newswise

This upcoming JAMA-published study examined whether the COVID-19 vaccine impacts male fertility.

Released: 16-Jun-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Two COVID-19 Vaccines Show Safety, Strong Immunity in Infant Model
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

The Moderna mRNA vaccine and a protein-based vaccine candidate elicited durable neutralizing antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 in pre-clinical research. There were no adverse effects.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 17-Jun-2021 5:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 16-Jun-2021 5:00 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 17-Jun-2021 5:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.


Showing results

110 of 5835

close
3.0894