Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP)

Physical Therapy Led to Lower Mortality Among Hospitalized Patients with COVID-19

Newswise — Patients recovering from COVID-19 who had a course of physical therapy in the hospital had lower incidence of mortality compared to those who did not, according to a new study presented this week at the Association of Academic Physiatrists Annual Meeting.

Although evidence shows that physical therapy (PT) improves mobility and probably mortality, many patients hospitalized for COVID-19 are not prescribed therapy. To understand PT’s potential impact on COVID-19 outcomes, researchers compared mortality incidence between patients who did and did not receive therapy.

“Therapy has proven to be a safe and effective way to decrease mortality risk, morbidity and quality of life. During COVID-19, many patients did not receive therapy because of staffing and PPE [personal protective equipment] shortages,” said Sandeep Yerra, MBBS, Research Fellow, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, at Montefiore Hospital. Through this study, we show that physical therapy improves the mortality outcomes in COVID-19 patients.”

The retrospective study included 1,314 patients admitted to a community-based, suburban hospital for COVID-19 between March 1 and May 31, 2020. Patients were separated into two study groups: those who received PT and those who did not. Researchers collected demographic data, code status, comorbidities, intubation status, length of hospital stay, and data on disposition and mortality.

They found some notable baseline differences between the two groups of patients. Patients who received PT tended to be older, with an average age of 74.04 compared to 60.63 for those who did not have therapy.

Patients who received therapy had more comorbidities and were also at a lower level of physical function prior to hospitalization compared to the non-PT group, said Dr. Yerra.

Only 48% of the PT patients were independent compared to 74% of the patients who did not have PT. Intubation rates were similar in both patient groups, about 11%.

When the researchers compared mortality rates between the two patient groups, there was a very surprising finding: COVID-19 patients who received PT in the hospital had a lower rate of mortality, or 12%, compared to 25% for patients who did not, despite being at a lower level of physical function before they contracted COVID-19, and having higher rates of hypertension, heart disease and diabetes.

“Patients in the PT group in the study had less than half the mortality rate compared to the non-PT group. Physical therapy should be considered in the treatment paradigm of COVID-19 patients. It is a non-expensive, safe and effective treatment tool that should be considered in every COVID admission,” said Dr. Yerra.

 

###

The Association of Academic Physiatrists (AAP) is a professional society with a mission to create the future of academic physiatry through mentorship, leadership, and discovery. Its members are leading physicians, researchers, educators and in-training physiatrists from over 40 countries. The AAP holds an Annual Meeting, produces a leading medical journal in rehabilitation: AJPM&R, and leads a variety of programs and activities that support and enhance academic physiatry. On February 9-13, 2021, the AAP is hosting its first-ever virtual Annual Meeting, Physiatry ‘21. To learn more about the association, the specialty of physiatry and Physiatry ‘21, visit physiatry.org and follow us on Twitter at @AAPhysiatrists.

 




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 5476
Newswise: Low-dose Administration of MERS DNA Vaccine Candidate Induces Potent Immunity and Protects From Virus Challenge in Preclinical Models
Released: 22-Apr-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Low-dose Administration of MERS DNA Vaccine Candidate Induces Potent Immunity and Protects From Virus Challenge in Preclinical Models
Wistar Institute

A synthetic DNA vaccine candidate for Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) developed at The Wistar Institute induced potent immune responses and afforded protective efficacy in non-human primate (NHP) models when given intradermally in abbreviated, low-dose immunization regimen.

Released: 22-Apr-2021 12:55 PM EDT
Tennessee-Based Veteran-Owned Start-Up to Develop New COVID-19 Screening Method
Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

DHS S&T awarded $199,653 in Phase 1 funding to Farmspace Systems, LLC, a veteran-owned start-up based in Alamo, Tenn., to enhance its COVID Finder technology, a non-thermal detection COVID-19 screening method.

Newswise: Among COVID-19 survivors, an increased risk of death, serious illness
Released: 22-Apr-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Among COVID-19 survivors, an increased risk of death, serious illness
Washington University in St. Louis

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that even mild cases of COVID-19 increase the risk of death in the six months following diagnosis and that this risk increases with disease severity. The comprehensive study also catalogues the wide-ranging and long-term health problems often triggered by the infection, even among those not hospitalized.

Released: 22-Apr-2021 11:25 AM EDT
Artificial intelligence model predicts which key of the immune system opens the locks of coronavirus
University of Helsinki

The human immune defense is based on the ability of white blood cells to accurately identify disease-causing pathogens and to initiate a defense reaction against them

Newswise: Faster Air Exchange in Buildings Not Always Beneficial for Coronavirus Levels
AUDIO
Released: 22-Apr-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Faster Air Exchange in Buildings Not Always Beneficial for Coronavirus Levels
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Vigorous and rapid air exchanges might not always be a good thing when it comes to levels of coronavirus particles in a multiroom building, according to a new modeling study. Particle levels can spike in downstream rooms shortly after rapid ventilation.

Released: 21-Apr-2021 5:20 PM EDT
Research Results: Double Masking During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Environmental Protection Agency - Center for Environmental Solutions and Emergency Response (CESER)

EPA, along with their co-authors at UNC, recently published an article titled “Fitted Filtration Efficiency of Double Masking During the COVID-19 Pandemic.”

Released: 21-Apr-2021 3:55 PM EDT
ACTG Adds First Polyclonal Antibody to ACTIV-2 Outpatient Treatment Study for COVID-19
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

The AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG), the largest global HIV research network, has added SAB-185, a polyclonal antibody therapy, to the COVID-19 outpatient treatment study.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 27-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 21-Apr-2021 3:45 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 21-Apr-2021 2:10 PM EDT
New insights on inflammation in COVID-19
Wiley

Severe cases of COVID-19 can involve extensive inflammation in the body, and clinicians have wondered if this state is similar to what are called cytokine storm syndromes, in which the immune system produces too many inflammatory signals that can sometimes lead to organ failure and death.


Showing results

110 of 5476

close
1.8409