Population currently sees coronavirus as the greatest health risk

The BfR publishes the eleventh Consumer Monitor on the perception of health risks

Newswise — Next on the list of concerns, though notably less frequently mentioned, are unhealthy or wrong diet as well as climate and environmental pollution - these were the most frequently mentioned concerns in February's survey. "The coronavirus pandemic dominates public perception", says BfR President Professor Dr. Dr. Andreas Hensel.

Go to the Consumer Monitor information booklet 08/2020: https://www.bfr.bund.de/cm/364/bfr-consumer-monitor-08-2020.pdf

Go to the interactive website (only in German): https://www.bfr.bund.de/epaper/vm-dashboard/

Since the study series began in 2014, no other topic has been so often spontaneously named as the greatest health risk as the novel coronavirus. In spite of this, however, only a third of respondents had heard of coronaviruses on food at the time the data was collected in August 2020. Correspondingly, few people (12 percent) are concerned about this. From a scientific perspective, it is unlikely that the coronavirus is transmitted via food. Nevertheless, the general rules of hygiene for preparing food should always be observed. Current information on the perception of the novel coronavirus among the German population is available in the special series "BfR-Corona-Monitor", which is published every 14 days.

When asked about selected topics, antimicrobial resistance and microplastics in food are still the issues that most people worry about. In each case, nearly 60 percent say they are concerned about these topics. Genetically modified foods rank third - the concern here has increased by six percentage points compared to the previous survey.

The results of the current BfR Consumer Monitor as well as the previous issue (February 2020) can now also be viewed interactively. On the new website set up for this, the results can be broken down by different groups of people (e. g., gender and age) and the data can be downloaded at the touch of a button. Feedback on the new presentation format is welcome - just click on the button "Wie gefällt Ihnen diese Seite?".

###

To the interactive website (only in German): https://www.bfr.bund.de/epaper/vm-dashboard/

About the BfR Consumer Monitor

Whether antimicrobial resistance, microplastics, salmonella or aluminium in foods - which health risks do the population know about and what is it that worries them? The BfR Consumer Monitor provides answers to these and other questions. For this survey, around 1,000 people living in private households, and who are at least 14 years old, are interviewed by telephone on behalf of the BfR every six months.

About the BfR

The German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) is a scientifically independent institution within the portfolio of the Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (BMEL) in Germany. It advises the German federal government and German federal states ("Laender") on questions of food, chemical and product safety. The BfR conducts its own research on topics that are closely linked to its assessment tasks.

This text version is a translation of the original German text which is the only legally binding version.




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 5584
Released: 7-May-2021 1:40 PM EDT
There is no evidence that vaccines could cause harm to people who have recovered from COVID-19
Newswise

An article published by Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s anti-vaccination organization and widely shared on social media questions the need of vaccinating those who’ve already recovered from COVID-19. The article says there’s a "potential risk of harm, including death" in getting the vaccines. We report this claim as false. There is no evidence that vaccinating people who had previously had COVID is resulting in an increased risk of adverse events.

Newswise: Abbott.jpg
Released: 7-May-2021 1:00 PM EDT
FSU expert available to discuss intellectual property and COVID-19 vaccines
Florida State University

By: Bill Wellock | Published: May 7, 2021 | 11:55 am | SHARE: President Joe Biden has expressed his support for a World Trade Organization proposal to waive intellectual property rights for COVID-19 vaccines.Florida State University law professor Frederick Abbott, the Edward Ball Eminent Scholar Professor of International Law, is available to comment on international intellectual property rights and global economic issues around the proposal.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 11-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 7-May-2021 1:00 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 11-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 7-May-2021 11:15 AM EDT
Asthma attacks plummeted among Black and hispanic/latinx individuals during the COVID-19 pandemic
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Asthma attacks account for almost 50 percent of the cost of asthma care which totals $80 billion each year in the United States

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 11-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 7-May-2021 10:40 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 11-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 7-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Navigating the COVID-19 crisis to prevent pressure injuries: Learning health system helped one hospital adapt and update care in real time
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare systems scrambled to modify patient care processes – particularly when it came to strategies aimed at reducing the risk of hospital-related complications. A look at how one hospital applied its learning health system (LHS) framework to respond to a COVID-19-related increase in hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPIs) is presented in the May/June Journal for Healthcare Quality (JHQ), the peer-reviewed journal of the National Association for Healthcare Quality (NAHQ). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: Ultra-Fast COVID-19 Sensor Invented at Texas Tech Gets Boost Into International Markets
Released: 7-May-2021 8:55 AM EDT
Ultra-Fast COVID-19 Sensor Invented at Texas Tech Gets Boost Into International Markets
Texas Tech University

EviroTech LLC announced today (May 7) a $4 million investment into the company by 1701 Ventures GmbH of Göttingen, Germany, which will allow EviroTech to complete the final design, production startup and market introduction of its Ultra-Fast COVID-19 detection sensor.

Released: 7-May-2021 7:05 AM EDT
Rutgers Recruiting Participants for Pfizer COVID-19 Pediatric Vaccine Clinical Trial
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers has been selected as a clinical trial site for the global Pfizer-BioNTech research study to evaluate the efficacy of its COVID-19 vaccine in children ages 6 months to 11 years. This is the third time Rutgers has served as a COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial site for pharmaceutical companies. Last fall, it conducted trials for Moderna and Johnson & Johnson.


Showing results

110 of 5584

close
5.6317