American Psychological Association (APA)

President’s Declaring Opioid Epidemic a First Step, but Much More Needed, According to APA

Association outlines other critical measures to stem the tide

WASHINGTON – President Trump’s declaring the opioid epidemic a national health emergency is a critical first step, but it does not address the urgent need for more federal funds to fight this crisis, according to the CEO of the American Psychological Association.

“We applaud the president for declaring the opioid crisis a national health emergency, for which the American Psychological Association has been advocating,” said APA CEO Arthur C. Evans Jr., PhD. “However, this action does not automatically direct additional -- and much-needed -- federal funds to address this problem. We urge the president and Congress to direct more money to the states, which are battling this epidemic on the front lines.”

Evans called for other measures to stem the rise of opioid use, including:

Expanding funding for substance use prevention and treatment services at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and for research at the National Institutes of Health on a broad range of treatments for opioid use disorder.Allowing the government to negotiate lower prices for naloxone, a drug that quickly counteracts the effects of opioid overdose.Promoting the use of non-pharmacological alternatives for pain management by psychologists and other behavioral health professionals to lower the incidence of opioid use disorder.Granting Medicaid waivers to all 50 states and other U.S. jurisdictions to allow coverage of services for mental health and substance use disorders in institutions for mental disease.Providing viable treatment alternatives to incarceration for individuals accused of minor opioid use-related offenses.Appointing a director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy and filling the post of Health and Human Services secretary, which would help ensure that all possible actions are taken to respond to this emergency declaration.“It is critical that we provide access to affordable, quality health services and that our health care system embrace integrated health care, in which psychologists and other health care professionals work in teams to provide comprehensive health services. This includes working to prevent and treat substance use disorders,” Evans added.

The American Psychological Association, in Washington, D.C., is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States. APA's membership includes nearly 115,700 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students. Through its divisions in 54 subfields of psychology and affiliations with 60 state, territorial and Canadian provincial associations, APA works to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people's lives.

www.apa.org

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