New York University

Report Sees ‘Tough Challenges’ to Building Up Transportation Ridership in New York City

Report from NYU Rudin Center in collaboration with Sam Schwartz Engineering looks across the array of mobility modes.
29-Jul-2020 7:05 PM EDT, by New York University

Newswise — When New York Governor Andrew Cuomo issued a shelter-in-place executive order to limit the spread of the coronavirus in late March, only essential workers, approximately 25% of the New York City workforce, were permitted to travel. 

The impact on the city’s mobility, transportation agencies, and transit workforce was momentous. One hundred and thirty-two transit workers have died from complications of the coronavirus since then, and at least 10,000 employees became ill. Subway usage dropped from 5.5 million on an average weekday to less than 500,000 a day. Vehicle traffic fell by 84%, and pedestrian flows in the Central Business District fell by 83.5%. Tolls and fares plummeted while operating costs increased.

A new report from the NYU Rudin Center for Transportation Policy & Management, in collaboration with Sam Schwartz Engineering, looks closely at the effects of the pandemic on New York’s transportation systems during the spring of 2020. The report examines the array of current mobility modes—from subways and buses to bicycles and taxis and for-hire vehicles—as well as commuter rail and vehicular use of bridges and tunnels.

“New York City and the surrounding region face tough challenges to re-build ridership and restore faith in public transit—critical factors in any economic recovery,” according to the report, titled “Transportation During Coronavirus in New York City,” which recommends policies to foster the renewal and expansion of mobility in the coming months and years.

To interview the lead author Sarah Kaufman, adjunct assistant professor of urban planning at NYU Wagner, and associate director of the Rudin Center, please contact the NYU press officer listed with this release.




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 2785
Released: 4-Aug-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Tip Sheet: COVID-19 vaccines, COVID-19 and cancer patients, smoking cessation apps, structural racism in medicine – and more
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Summaries of recent Fred Hutch research findings and other news with links for additional background and media contacts.

Newswise: Story Tips: Pandemic impact, root studies, neutrons confirm, lab on a crystal and modeling fusion
Released: 4-Aug-2020 1:25 PM EDT
Story Tips: Pandemic impact, root studies, neutrons confirm, lab on a crystal and modeling fusion
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

ORNL Story Tips: Pandemic impact, root studies, neutrons confirm, lab on a crystal and modeling fusion

Newswise: How Countries Are Reopening Schools During the Pandemic
Released: 4-Aug-2020 1:20 PM EDT
How Countries Are Reopening Schools During the Pandemic
Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)

Educators worldwide are facing the agonizing decision of whether to resume in-person instruction while there’s still no cure for the new coronavirus. Countries including Denmark, India, and Kenya are taking different approaches.

Released: 4-Aug-2020 11:55 AM EDT
ACTG Announces Launch of Novel Clinical Trial Testing Multiple Therapeutics to Treat COVID-19
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

The AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) has initiated the ACTIV-2 Outpatient Monoclonal Antibodies and Other Therapies Trial. ACTIV-2 includes both phase 2 and phase 3 evaluations of multiple promising investigational agents for treating early COVID-19 in a single trial.

Newswise:Video Embedded covid-19-study-confirms-low-transmission-in-educational-settings2
VIDEO
Released: 4-Aug-2020 11:20 AM EDT
COVID-19 study confirms low transmission in educational settings
University of Sydney

The rate of COVID-19 transmission in New South Wales (NSW) educational settings was extremely limited during the first wave of COVID-19, research findings published today in The Lancet Journal of Child and Adolescent Health have shown.

Newswise: Droplet Spread from Humans Doesn’t Always Follow Airflow
31-Jul-2020 3:15 PM EDT
Droplet Spread from Humans Doesn’t Always Follow Airflow
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

If aerosol transmission of COVID-19 is confirmed to be significant, as suspected, we will need to reconsider guidelines on social distancing, ventilation systems and shared spaces. Researchers in the U.K. believe a better understanding of different droplet behaviors and their different dispersion mechanisms is also needed. In Physics of Fluids, the group presents a model that demarcates differently sized droplets. This has implications for understanding the spread of airborne diseases, because the dispersion tests revealed the absence of intermediate-sized droplets.

Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:30 AM EDT
COVID-19 study confirms low transmission in educational settings
University of Sydney

The rate of COVID-19 transmission in New South Wales (NSW) educational settings was extremely limited during the first wave of COVID-19, research findings published today in The Lancet Journal of Child and Adolescent Health have shown.

Newswise: Researchers develop new mouse model for SARS-CoV-2
Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Researchers develop new mouse model for SARS-CoV-2
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Yale University School of Medicine have developed a new mouse model to study SARS-CoV-2 infection and disease and to accelerate testing of novel treatments and vaccines against the novel coronavirus. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), also suggests that, rather than protecting the lungs, key antiviral signaling proteins may actually cause much of the tissue damage associated with COVID-19.

Newswise: Exposure to common cold coronaviruses can teach the immune system to recognize SARS-CoV-2
Released: 4-Aug-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Exposure to common cold coronaviruses can teach the immune system to recognize SARS-CoV-2
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

A new study led by scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) shows that memory helper T cells that recognize common cold coronaviruses also recognize matching sites on SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.


Showing results

110 of 2785

close
3.1573