North Carolina State University

Researchers Create New Tools for Disaster Response Volunteers

15-Apr-2020 12:45 PM EDT, by North Carolina State University

Newswise — In the wake of a disaster, many people want to help. Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Alabama have developed tools to help emergency response and relief managers coordinate volunteer efforts in order to do the most good.

“Assigning volunteers after a disaster can be difficult, because you don’t know how many volunteers are coming or when they will arrive,” says Maria Mayorga, corresponding author of two studies on the issue and a professor in NC State’s Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering.

“In addition, the challenge can be complicated for efforts, such as food distribution, where you also don’t know the amount of supplies you will have to distribute or how many people will need assistance.”

The researchers used advanced computational models to address these areas of uncertainty in order to develop guidelines, or rules of thumb, that emergency relief managers can use to help volunteers make the biggest difference.

The most recent paper focuses on assigning volunteers to deal with tasks where the amount of work that needs to be done can change over time, such as search and rescue, needs assessment and distribution of relief supplies.

“Essentially, we developed a model that can be used to determine the optimal assignment of volunteers to tasks when you don’t know how much work will be required,” Mayorga says. “For example, in relief distribution, there is uncertainty in both the supply of relief items and what the demand will be from disaster survivors.

“We then used the model to create and test rules of thumb that can be applied even when relief managers don’t have access to computers or the internet.”

The researchers found that a simple policy that performs well is the “Largest Weighted Demand (LWD) policy,” which assigns volunteers to the task that has the most work left to be done. In this case, work is prioritized by its importance. For example, fulfilling demand for water is more important than fulfilling demand for cleaning supplies.

However, if the difference in importance between tasks becomes large enough, then the best option is for managers to assign volunteers based on “Largest Queue Clearing Time (LQCT),” which is the time needed to complete the current work if the current number of volunteers is unchanged.

“In fact, the LQCT heuristic worked well in all of the instances we tested, but it is harder to assess quickly,” Mayorga says. “So we recommend that managers use the LWD rule unless there is a really large difference in the importance of the tasks.”

However, the LWD and LQCT rules of thumb don’t work for all tasks.

In fact, the researchers found that the rules of thumb that make sense for volunteer tasks where you don’t know how much work will be required are actually a bad fit for tasks with clearly defined workloads – such as clearing debris after a disaster.

In a 2017 paper, the researchers found that a good rule of thumb for clearing debris was “Fewest Volunteers,” in which volunteers are simply assigned to whichever task has the fewest volunteers working on it.

“Spontaneous volunteers are people who, in the wake of a disaster, impulsively contribute to response and recovery efforts without affiliations to recognized volunteer organizations (e.g. the Red Cross) or other typical first responders,” Mayorga says. “These people constitute a labor source that is both invaluable and hard to manage.

“Our work in these papers provides strategies for incorporating spontaneous volunteers into organized relief efforts to help us achieve safe and responsive disaster management. It’s also worth noting that these works focused on a single organization assigning volunteers to tasks. In our future work, we are focusing on strategies that can be used by multiple agencies to coordinate efforts and amplify the volunteer response.”

The most recent paper, “Assigning spontaneous volunteers to relief efforts under uncertainty in task demand and volunteer availability,” is published in Omega: the International Journal of Management Science. First author of the paper is Kyle Paret, a Ph.D. student at NC State. The paper was co-authored by Emmett Lodree, an associate professor of operations management at the University of Alabama.

The 2017 paper, “The optimal assignment of spontaneous volunteers,” is published in the Journal of the Operational Research Society. That paper was co-authored by Justin Wolczynski, a former M.S. student at NC State, and by Lodree.

SEE ORIGINAL STUDY




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 2455
Newswise: Harmful Microbes Found on Sewer Pipe Walls
Released: 6-Jul-2020 6:00 AM EDT
Harmful Microbes Found on Sewer Pipe Walls
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Can antibiotic-resistant bacteria escape from sewers into waterways and cause a disease outbreak? A new Rutgers study, published in the journal Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology, examined the microbe-laden “biofilms” that cling to sewer walls, and even built a simulated sewer to study the germs that survive within.

Released: 3-Jul-2020 10:25 AM EDT
Lack of lockdown increased COVID-19 deaths in Sweden
University of Virginia Health System

Sweden’s controversial decision not to lock down during COVID-19 produced more deaths and greater healthcare demand than seen in countries with earlier, more stringent interventions, a new analysis finds.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Researchers outline adapted health communications principles for the COVID-19 pandemic
CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy

The COVID-19 pandemic has introduced unique challenges for public health practitioners and health communicators that warrant an expansion of existing health communication principles to take into consideration.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Collectivism drives efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19
University of Kent

Research from the University of Kent has found that people who adopt a collectivist mindset are more likely to comply with social distancing and hygiene practices to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Tiny mineral particles are better vehicles for promising gene therapy
University of Wisconsin-Madison

University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers have developed a safer and more efficient way to deliver a promising new method for treating cancer and liver disorders and for vaccination — including a COVID-19 vaccine from Moderna Therapeutics that has advanced to clinical trials with humans.

Newswise: Newer variant of COVID-19–causing virus dominates global infections
Released: 2-Jul-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Newer variant of COVID-19–causing virus dominates global infections
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Research out today in the journal Cell shows that a specific change in the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus virus genome, previously associated with increased viral transmission and the spread of COVID-19, is more infectious in cell culture.

Newswise: From Wuhan to San Diego—How a mutation on the novel coronavirus has come to dominate the globe
Released: 2-Jul-2020 12:05 PM EDT
From Wuhan to San Diego—How a mutation on the novel coronavirus has come to dominate the globe
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Two variants of the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), called G614 and D614, were circulating in mid-March. A new study shows that the G version of the virus has come to dominate cases around the world. They report that this mutation does not make the virus more deadly, but it does help the virus copy itself, resulting in a higher viral load, or "titer," in patients.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 11:50 AM EDT
New Study Explains Potential Causes for “Happy Hypoxia” Condition in COVID-19 Patients
Loyola Medicine

A new research study provides possible explanations for COVID-19 patients who present with extremely low, otherwise life-threatening levels of oxygen, but no signs of dyspnea (difficulty breathing). This new understanding of the condition, known as silent hypoxemia or “happy hypoxia,” could prevent unnecessary intubation and ventilation in patients during the current and expected second wave of coronavirus.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 10:15 AM EDT
Stemming the Spread of Misinformation on Social Media
Association for Psychological Science

New research reported in the journal Psychological Science finds that priming people to think about accuracy could make them more discerning in what they subsequently share on social media.


Showing results

110 of 2455

close
0.78854