Missouri University of Science and Technology

Researchers developing coronavirus detection system to screen travelers

Newswise — Researchers at Missouri S&T are developing an airborne-biohazard system that could help screeners spot air travelers with lung diseases due to coronavirus and other viruses. Professors in electrical and computer engineering are using machine learning to build a robust system to alert authorities to airborne biohazards as travelers pass through TSA security checkpoints.

Assistant professor Dr. Jie Huang and visiting professor Dr. Rex E. Gerald II, their lead graduate student Chen Zhu, and assistant research professor Dr. Qingbo Yang are working on the prototype. Dr. Donald Wunsch, who has expertise in artificial intelligence (AI), recently joined the research effort.

“The mission of this lab is to invent sensors that have ultra-high sensitivity,” Huang says. “We are advancing new frontiers in research.”

To trigger the airborne-biohazard system, individuals would exhale into a sensor that Huang’s team is developing to detect viruses in the breath. If the sensor indicates a virus, the breath would be chemically tagged for further testing in a spectrometer. The researchers say the entire process would take less than a minute and could eventually differentiate between a cold, flu or coronavirus. The research team hopes the system could be made widely available in accessible locations so that people could self-test, similar to blood pressure monitors in retail stores.

“This could provide valuable information to the individual, done in private of course,” says Gerald. “We focused on airports first to try to mitigate the impact of canceled flights in the event of a potential pandemic, which could cost billions of dollars to the airline industry.”

With each iteration of the prototype device, the research team has provided researchers in other disciplines, such as biology, chemistry, and medical research, with the opportunity to evaluate the evolving design of the sensor system. The team adjusts and modifies the system based on feedback from those evaluations. The researchers say the front-end sensor that would indicate whether someone is sick or healthy could be ready for clinical trials in about a year, adding that the full system with chemical tagging and a spectrometer will take significantly longer.

The biohazard sensor showcases the types of research that complement the University of Missouri System’s NextGen Precision Health Initiative. NextGen is expected to accelerate medical breakthroughs and improve lives by harnessing the research being done at the system’s four universities and training a new generation of health scientists and practitioners.




Filters close

Showing results

1120 of 3446
Released: 29-Sep-2020 1:15 PM EDT
New genetic knowledge on the causes of severe COVID-19
Aarhus University

Worldwide, otherwise healthy adolescents and young people without underlying conditions are sometimes severely affected by COVID-19, with the viral infection in the worst cases quickly becoming life-threatening. But why is this happening?

Released: 29-Sep-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Can the common cold help protect you from COVID-19?
University of Rochester Medical Center

Seasonal colds are by all accounts no fun, but new research suggests the colds you've had in the past may provide some protection from COVID-19.

Released: 29-Sep-2020 12:25 PM EDT
Sensational COVID-19 communication erodes confidence in science
Cornell University

Scientists, policymakers and the media should acknowledge inherent uncertainties in epidemiological models projecting the spread of COVID-19 and avoid “catastrophizing” worst-case scenarios, according to new research from Cornell University.

Newswise:Video Embedded feeling-stressed-or-down-in-a-world-with-covid-try-this-writing-tool
VIDEO
Released: 29-Sep-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Feeling stressed or down in a world with COVID? Try this writing tool
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new expressive writing tool allows people to put their thoughts and feelings into words to help relieve stress and anxiety. Participants are given a prompt and directed to write for 5-10 minutes, expressing their deepest thoughts and feelings. A computer analyzes keywords and tone to provide feedback.

Newswise: Computer Model Shows How COVID-19 Could Lead to Runaway Inflammation
Released: 29-Sep-2020 9:30 AM EDT
Computer Model Shows How COVID-19 Could Lead to Runaway Inflammation
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

New study addresses a mystery first raised in March: Why do some people with COVID-19 develop severe inflammation? The research shows how the molecular structure and sequence of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein could be behind life-threatening inflammatory conditions MIS-C and cytokine storm.

Newswise: Follow Expert Guidelines to Keep Halloween Safe for Those with Allergies and Asthma
Released: 29-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Follow Expert Guidelines to Keep Halloween Safe for Those with Allergies and Asthma
American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)

A COVID-19 Halloween means additional precautions for kids with allergies and asthma.

Newswise: 244169_web.jpg
Released: 29-Sep-2020 8:25 AM EDT
COVID-19: Saliva tests could detect silent carriers
Hokkaido University

Testing self-collected saliva samples could offer an easy and effective mass testing approach for detecting asymptomatic COVID-19.


Showing results

1120 of 3446

close
1.20772