Expert Pitch

Rutgers Experts Available to Discuss Dangers of Consuming, Injecting Disinfectants

Two Rutgers medical experts are available to discuss the dangers of ingesting or injecting household disinfectants following the President Trump’s remarks that such cleaners could possibly treat COVID-19. 

  • “Injecting or ingesting a disinfectant to treat COVID-19 is not only ineffective, it is highly dangerous and can be fatal,” said Professor Diane P. Calello, executive and medical director of the New Jersey Poison Control Centerat Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. “Bleach, hydrogen peroxide and other disinfectants are simply not intended for use inside the delicate circulatory system. If injected, they can quickly cause damage to the brain, lungs and other vital organs and even death. The Poison Control Center urges the public to not undertake such a practice and instead to focus on safe cleaning and disinfecting measures.”

 

  • “There is grave concern that people will inject cleaning solutions in response to these dangerous recommendations,” said Lewis Nelson, chair of emergency medicine at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School and chief of service in the Emergency Department at University Hospital. “It is imperative that we inform the public about the dangers of this practice. We have seen the end result of this in our practice and it is awful.” 

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About Rutgers New Jersey Medical School

Founded in 1954, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School is the oldest school of medicine in the state. Today it is part of Rutgers, The State University of New Jerse,y and graduates approximately 170 physicians a year. In addition to providing the MD degree, the school offers MD/PhD, MD/MPH and MD/MBA degrees through collaborations with other institutions of higher education.

 

About New Jersey Poison Control Center (NJPIES)

Chartered in 1983, the New Jersey Poison Information & Education System (NJPIES) is New Jersey’s only poison control center. Medical professionals such as physicians, registered nurses, and pharmacists offer free consultation through hotline services (telephone, text, and chat) regarding poison emergencies and provide information on poison prevention, drugs, food poisoning, animal bites, and more.

 

ABOUT RBHS

Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences (RBHS) takes an integrated approach to educating students, providing clinical care and conducting research, all with the goal of improving human health. Aligned with Rutgers University–New Brunswick, and collaborating university-wide, RBHS includes eight schools, a behavioral health network and four centers and institutes.




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