Scientists Reveal COVID-19 News, Next Frontier in Fighting Substance Abuse, More

Register for online access to cutting-edge science at Experimental Biology 2021, April 27–30
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

Want to find out the latest insights into COVID-19, explore new medicines for fighting substance abuse or delve into cultural challenges facing the scientific community? The Experimental Biology (EB) 2021 meeting is your source for the latest research and discussion on today’s hot topics in science and medicine. 

EB 2021, to be held April 27–30, is the annual meeting of five scientific societies, bringing together thousands of scientists and 25 guest societies in one interdisciplinary event.

To request a press pass, please complete a Press Registration Form. Approved reporters receive complimentary meeting registration and full access to our virtual newsroom. We encourage advance registration as it may take up to a day to receive access once the meeting begins.

View the program to get the latest information on planned scientific sessions and events. 

Highlights from EB 2021 include:

Understanding and containing the COVID-19 pandemic — Short lightning talks will cover mechanisms behind COVID-19 infections, predicting outcomes based on underlying conditions, and the state of testing. This American Society for Investigative Pathology Expert Roundtable will also discuss controlling COVID-19 in meat and poultry processing plants, genotyping emerging variants, and current and emerging treatments. Talks will be followed by a live moderated Q&A session. (25 p.m. Friday, April 30) (more information)

Gender differences in COVID-19 — SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is showing severe illness and mortality in men, a pattern opposite to influenza outbreaks in which sickness and death are often higher in women. This American Physiological Society symposium will address key findings regarding sex differences in the progression of SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19. (10–11:30 a.m. Thursday, April 29) (more information)

Orchestrating a 3D symphony of stem cells for regeneration — This American Association for Anatomy session will examine the latest advances in 3D tissue engineering, including new applications for nanocomposites and the potential of organ printing for regenerative medicine. Speakers also will cover how 3D printing of cells and other materials can be used to construct tissue and influence cell behavior. (1011 a.m. Tuesday, April 27) (more information)

Creating a culture of wellness in science — This American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology symposium will examine best practices for mentorship, how to promote mental well-being and ways to prevent and overcome harassment. (11:15 a.m. Tuesday, April 27) (more information). A related talk by Sharon Milgram, director of intramural training and education at the National Institutes of Health, will cover painful and important lessons about resilience and wellness for scientists. (5 p.m. Tuesday, April 27) (more information). Helen Kaiser and Michael Diaz from the University of California San Diego will also give a related talk (11:45 a.m. Thursday, April 29) (more information). 

Real world perspective on the substance use epidemic — Substance use disorders have increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. Although the opioid epidemic may receive the most media attention, misuse of stimulant drugs is also a significant problem. During the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics President’s Symposium, experts will provide an update on current substance use disorder challenges and examine emerging approaches for developing more effective medications. (1011:30 a.m. Wednesday, April 28) (more information)

EB host societies are the American Association for AnatomyAmerican Physiological SocietyAmerican Society for Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyAmerican Society for Investigative Pathology and American Society for Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics.

 

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Released: 7-May-2021 1:40 PM EDT
There is no evidence that vaccines could cause harm to people who have recovered from COVID-19
Newswise

An article published by Robert F. Kennedy Jr.’s anti-vaccination organization and widely shared on social media questions the need of vaccinating those who’ve already recovered from COVID-19. The article says there’s a "potential risk of harm, including death" in getting the vaccines. We report this claim as false. There is no evidence that vaccinating people who had previously had COVID is resulting in an increased risk of adverse events.

Newswise: Abbott.jpg
Released: 7-May-2021 1:00 PM EDT
FSU expert available to discuss intellectual property and COVID-19 vaccines
Florida State University

By: Bill Wellock | Published: May 7, 2021 | 11:55 am | SHARE: President Joe Biden has expressed his support for a World Trade Organization proposal to waive intellectual property rights for COVID-19 vaccines.Florida State University law professor Frederick Abbott, the Edward Ball Eminent Scholar Professor of International Law, is available to comment on international intellectual property rights and global economic issues around the proposal.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 11-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 7-May-2021 1:00 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 11-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 7-May-2021 11:15 AM EDT
Asthma attacks plummeted among Black and hispanic/latinx individuals during the COVID-19 pandemic
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Asthma attacks account for almost 50 percent of the cost of asthma care which totals $80 billion each year in the United States

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 11-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 7-May-2021 10:40 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 11-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 7-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Navigating the COVID-19 crisis to prevent pressure injuries: Learning health system helped one hospital adapt and update care in real time
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare systems scrambled to modify patient care processes – particularly when it came to strategies aimed at reducing the risk of hospital-related complications. A look at how one hospital applied its learning health system (LHS) framework to respond to a COVID-19-related increase in hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPIs) is presented in the May/June Journal for Healthcare Quality (JHQ), the peer-reviewed journal of the National Association for Healthcare Quality (NAHQ). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: Ultra-Fast COVID-19 Sensor Invented at Texas Tech Gets Boost Into International Markets
Released: 7-May-2021 8:55 AM EDT
Ultra-Fast COVID-19 Sensor Invented at Texas Tech Gets Boost Into International Markets
Texas Tech University

EviroTech LLC announced today (May 7) a $4 million investment into the company by 1701 Ventures GmbH of Göttingen, Germany, which will allow EviroTech to complete the final design, production startup and market introduction of its Ultra-Fast COVID-19 detection sensor.

Released: 7-May-2021 7:05 AM EDT
Rutgers Recruiting Participants for Pfizer COVID-19 Pediatric Vaccine Clinical Trial
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers has been selected as a clinical trial site for the global Pfizer-BioNTech research study to evaluate the efficacy of its COVID-19 vaccine in children ages 6 months to 11 years. This is the third time Rutgers has served as a COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial site for pharmaceutical companies. Last fall, it conducted trials for Moderna and Johnson & Johnson.


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