University of California, Irvine

Study links rising stress, depression in U.S. to pandemic-related losses, media consumption

UCI researchers suggest providing mental health services to those with the greatest need

Newswise — Irvine, Calif., Sept. 18, 2020 – Experiencing multiple stressors triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic – such as unemployment – and COVID-19-related media consumption are directly linked to rising acute stress and depressive symptoms across the U.S., according to a groundbreaking University of California, Irvine study.

The report appears in Science Advances, published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

“The pandemic is not hitting all communities equally,” said lead author E. Alison Holman, UCI professor of nursing. “People have lost wages, jobs and loved ones with record speed. Individuals living with chronic mental and physical illness are struggling; young people are struggling; poor communities are struggling. Mental health services need to be tailored to those most in need right now.”

In addition, the research highlights the connection between mental health and exposure to media coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic, suggesting the need to step away from the television, computer or smartphone to protect psychological well-being. 

“The media is a critical source of information for people when they’re faced with ambiguous, ongoing disasters,” said Roxane Cohen Silver, professor of psychological science and one of the study’s principal investigators. “But too much exposure can be overwhelming and lead to more stress, worry and perceived risks.”

With funding from a National Science Foundation RAPID grant, Holman, Silver, and co-investigators Dana Rose Garfin and Rebecca R. Thompson conducted a national survey of more than 6,500 U.S. residents in March and April 2020, as illness and deaths were rising around the country. Using the NORC AmeriSpeak panel, the study was the first of its kind to examine early predictors of rising mental health problems across the nation. The design let researchers evaluate the effects of the pandemic as it was unfolding in real time.

“Over the course of the study, the size of the pandemic shifted dramatically,” Holman said. Accordingly, people surveyed later in the study period reported the highest rate of acute stress and depressive symptoms.

The UCI team’s findings offer insights into priorities for building community resilience in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic:

  • Those with pre-existing mental and physical conditions are more likely to show both acute stress and depressive symptoms.
  • Secondary stressors – job and wage loss, a shortage of necessities – are also strong predictors in the development of these symptoms.
  • Extensive exposure to pandemic-related news and conflicting information in the news are among the strongest predictors of pandemic-specific acute stress.

“It’s critical that we prioritize providing resources to communities most in need of support right now – the unemployed, poor or chronically ill people, and young people,” Holman said. “We also encourage the public to limit exposure to media as an important public health intervention. It can prevent mental and physical health symptoms and promote resilience.”

About the University of California, Irvine: Founded in 1965, UCI is the youngest member of the prestigious Association of American Universities. The campus has produced three Nobel laureates and is known for its academic achievement, premier research, innovation and anteater mascot. Led by Chancellor Howard Gillman, UCI has more than 36,000 students and offers 222 degree programs. It’s located in one of the world’s safest and most economically vibrant communities and is Orange County’s second-largest employer, contributing $5 billion annually to the local economy. For more on UCI, visit www.uci.edu.

Media access: Radio programs/stations may, for a fee, use an on-campus ISDN line to interview UCI faculty and experts, subject to availability and university approval. For more UCI news, visit news.uci.edu. Additional resources for journalists may be found at communications.uci.edu/for-journalists.

 

NOTE TO EDITORS: PHOTO AVAILABLE AT
https://news.uci.edu/2020/09/18/study-links-rising-stress-depression-in-u-s-to-pandemic-related-losses-media-consumption/ 

SEE ORIGINAL STUDY




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 3817
Released: 30-Oct-2020 6:35 PM EDT
UCLA Health infectious disease experts tout critical role mask wearing plays in limiting spread of COVID-19
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

With thousands of new cases logged daily and a vaccine to fight COVID-19 still in development, UCLA Health infectious disease experts are encouraging people to continue to wear masks as the best method of protecting against virus transmission.

Released: 30-Oct-2020 5:35 PM EDT
Surgeon General expects COVID-19 vaccine to be available by year’s end
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

In a wide-ranging talk with UCLA Health physicians, Wednesday, Oct. 28, United States Surgeon General Jerome Adams, MD, MPH, addressed the politicization of the pandemic and the means of containing the spread of COVID-19. He also offered hope that a vaccine for the virus will be available by year’s end.

Released: 30-Oct-2020 4:15 PM EDT
Study shows myocarditis linked to COVID-19 not as common as believed
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center - New Orleans

A study conducted by Richard Vander Heide, MD, PhD, Professor and Director of Pathology Research at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, and Marc Halushka, MD, PhD, Professor of Pathology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, suggests myocarditis caused by COVID-19 may be a relatively rare occurrence.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 3-Nov-2020 11:00 AM EST Released to reporters: 30-Oct-2020 3:00 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 3-Nov-2020 11:00 AM EST The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: 247373_web.jpg
Released: 30-Oct-2020 2:30 PM EDT
Researcher develops app to reach Black community with COVID-19 information
University of Cincinnati

A University of Cincinnati cardiologist is partnering with researchers in St. Louis and rural Georgia to develop a smartphone app that will deliver COVID-19 information and education that is targeted toward Black communities.

Newswise: 247467_web.jpg
Released: 30-Oct-2020 1:55 PM EDT
SARS-CoV-2 might attack red marrow and block new erythrocytes formation
Far Eastern Federal University

Specialists from the Department of Fundamental Medicine of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with Russian and Japanese colleagues have probed into mechanisms of COVID-19 inside-the-body distribution linked to erythrocytes damaging. According to researchers, the virus might attack red marrow, thus being detrimental not only for erythrocytes in the bloodstream but also for the process of the formation of the new ones.

Released: 30-Oct-2020 12:40 PM EDT
Government of Canada awards $2.5M to McMaster University to support the COVID-19 border study with McMaster HealthLabs
McMaster University

McMaster University has been awarded $2.5 million from the Government of Canada to support the McMaster HealthLabs (MHL) Canadian International COVID-19 Surveillance Border Study at Toronto Pearson International Airport, being run in partnership with Air Canada and the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA).

Released: 30-Oct-2020 12:00 PM EDT
5 Big Questions on Health Care and COVID-19
University of Virginia Darden School of Business

The coronavirus pandemic has once again thrust the unusual state of American health care into the spotlight. With a presidential election that could have a dramatic impact on the state of health care for millions on 3 November, Professor Vivian Riefberg considers the state of the industry.

Newswise: Infection by Confection: COVID-19 and the Risk of Trick-or-Treating
Released: 30-Oct-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Infection by Confection: COVID-19 and the Risk of Trick-or-Treating
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers determined that COVID-19 transmission risk via Halloween candies is low, even when they are handled by infected people, but handwashing and disinfecting collected sweets reduces risk even further.

Newswise:Video Embedded third-spike-in-covid-19-cases-plus-the-vaccine-trials-live-expert-panel-for-october-29-3pm-edt
VIDEO
Released: 30-Oct-2020 9:40 AM EDT
TRANSCRIPT AND VIDEO AVAILABLE: "Third spike" in COVID-19 cases, plus the vaccine trials: Live Expert Panel for October 29
Newswise

"Third spike" in COVID-19 cases, plus the vaccine trials: Live Expert Panel for October 29, 3PM EDT


Showing results

110 of 3817

close
1.02426