American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC)

To Prevent a Second Wave of COVID-19, AACC Calls on Senate to Include 5 Recommendations in Upcoming Coronavirus Bill

WASHINGTON – Now that the latest coronavirus relief package, known as the Heroes Act, has moved forward to the U.S. Senate, AACC has sent a letter to Senate leadership outlining five key recommendations that will improve COVID-19 testing capacity across the U.S. AACC urges the Senate to ensure these recommendations are addressed within the Heroes Act, as they are critical to preventing a second wave of the pandemic. 

Read the letter here: https://www.aacc.org/health-and-science-policy/advocacy/comment-letters/2020/aacc-provides-input-to-senate-leadership-on-covid19-legislation 

With many states easing social distancing measures, it is more important than ever that the U.S. perform widespread testing for COVID-19 to contain the virus. However, the country is still falling well short of the testing levels that experts say are needed to prevent a second wave. For example, the U.S. performed an average of about 386,000 tests per day over the past week, but researchers from Harvard’s Global Health Institute estimate that the country needs to perform 900,000 tests per day to see a continued decline in cases. Previous coronavirus aid bills passed by Congress have played a crucial role in enabling the healthcare sector to ramp up to even these current testing levels. Like the legislation that has come before it, the Heroes Act as passed by the U.S. House of Representatives already includes essential provisions for combating the pandemic. However, there is still much more that needs to be done to prevent coronavirus cases from climbing again.   

To address the remaining gaps in U.S. testing, AACC’s members—who are clinical laboratory experts on the frontlines of COVID-19 testing—recommend that Congress include the following steps in any final package:

1. First, HHS should work with government stakeholders to develop a testing strategy that establishes a common terminology, identifies current challenges, specifies necessary resources, sets forth a plan for acquiring and distributing needed materials, and creates benchmarks and timelines for measuring progress.

2. To combat persistent testing supply shortages, the federal government should ensure that supplies are manufactured and distributed to labs in a timely manner. This effort should also enable healthcare facilities to regularly report their inventory levels so that the government can identify need and more equitably allocate resources.  

3. Congressional leaders should continue to provide additional funding to CDC so that it can build the public health infrastructure needed to address this crisis. 

4. The federal government should expand high-quality COVID-19 antibody testing by certifying the quality of these tests and reimbursing laboratories sufficiently for accurate antibody tests to facilitate widespread patient access to them.

5. The government should also continue to grant financial aid to healthcare facilities to offset the huge financial losses they are experiencing as a result of the pandemic.

“Thanks to Congress’ rapid and comprehensive approach to dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, the healthcare sector has made significant advances in expanding testing capacity,” said AACC President Dr. Carmen Wiley. “This has made it possible to better diagnose and care for patients and to slow the pandemic overall. We now urge the Senate to align the Heroes Act with lab experts’ recommendations before passing it into law, which is crucial to ensuring that the progress we’ve made fighting COVID-19 continues.” 

About AACC

Dedicated to achieving better health through laboratory medicine, AACC brings together more than 50,000 clinical laboratory professionals, physicians, research scientists, and business leaders from around the world focused on clinical chemistry, molecular diagnostics, mass spectrometry, translational medicine, lab management, and other areas of progressing laboratory science. Since 1948, AACC has worked to advance the common interests of the field, providing programs that advance scientific collaboration, knowledge, expertise, and innovation. For more information, visit www.aacc.org.

 




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 2528
Released: 10-Jul-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Simple blood test can predict severity of COVID-19 for some patients
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

An early prognosis factor that could be a key to determining who will suffer greater effects from COVID-19, and help clinicians better prepare for these patients, may have been uncovered by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). Results of the findings were published today in the International Journal of Laboratory Hematology.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Genetic ‘fingerprints’ of first COVID-19 cases help manage pandemic
University of Sydney

A new study published in the world-leading journal Nature Medicine, reveals how genomic sequencing and mathematical modelling gave important insights into the ‘parentage’ of cases and likely spread of the disease in New South Wales.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Our itch to share helps spread COVID-19 misinformation
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

To stay current about the Covid-19 pandemic, people need to process health information when they read the news. Inevitably, that means people will be exposed to health misinformation, too, in the form of false content, often found online, about the illness.

Newswise: Pandemic Inspires Framework for Enhanced Care in Nursing Homes
Released: 10-Jul-2020 12:25 PM EDT
Pandemic Inspires Framework for Enhanced Care in Nursing Homes
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

As of May 2020, nursing home residents account for a staggering one-third of the more than 80,000 deaths due to COVID-19 in the U.S. This pandemic has resulted in unprecedented threats—like reduced access to resources needed to contain and eliminate the spread of the virus—to achieving and sustaining care quality even in the best nursing homes. Active engagement of nursing home leaders in developing solutions responsive to the unprecedented threats to quality standards of care delivery is required.

Newswise: General Electric Healthcare Chooses UH to Clinically 
Evaluate First-of-its-kind Imaging System
Released: 10-Jul-2020 12:15 PM EDT
General Electric Healthcare Chooses UH to Clinically Evaluate First-of-its-kind Imaging System
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center physicians completed evaluation for the GE Healthcare Critical Care Suite, and the technology is now in daily clinical practice – flagging between seven to 15 collapsed lungs per day within the hospital. No one on the team could have predicted the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, but this technology and future research with GEHC may enhance the capability to improve care for COVID-19 patients in the ICU. Critical Care Suite is now assisting in COVID and non-COVID patient care as the AMX 240 travels to intensive care units within the hospital.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 11:50 AM EDT
COVID-19 Can Be Transmitted in the Womb, Reports Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

A baby girl in Texas – born prematurely to a mother with COVID-19 – is the strongest evidence to date that intrauterine (in the womb) transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can occur, reports The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, the official journal of The European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 9:45 AM EDT
How COVID-19 Shifted Inpatient Imaging Utilization
Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute

As medical resources shifted away from elective and non-urgent procedures toward emergent and critical care of COVID-19 patients, departments were forced to reconfigure their personnel and resources. In particular, many Radiology practices rescheduled non-urgent and routine imaging according to recommendations from the American College of Radiology (ACR). This new Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute study, published online in the Journal of American College of Radiology (JACR), evaluates the change in the inpatient imaging volumes and composition mix during the COVID-19 pandemic within a large healthcare system.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 12-Jul-2020 7:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 10-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 12-Jul-2020 7:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Team is first in Texas to investigate convalescent plasma for prevention of COVID-19 onset and progression
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

A research team is the first in Texas to investigate whether plasma from COVID-19 survivors can be used in outpatient settings to prevent the onset and progression of the virus in two new clinical trials at UTHealth.


Showing results

110 of 2528

close
0.83801