Expert Pitch
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health experts available for media inquiries related to COVID-19

The UCLA Fielding School of Public Health has multiple experts available for media inquiries related to COVID-19.

These include experts with English, Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, and Spanish fluency. They include:

Professor Hiram Beltrán-Sánchez

Hiram Beltrán-Sánchez is an associate professor of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and associate director of the California Center for Population Research. A primary line of Beltran-Sanchez's research focuses on estimating national-level burden of chronic, violence-related, and infectious disease mortality, and their impact on life expectancy and years of healthy life, and in understanding how early life circumstances may be related to adult health and illness. He is currently researching COVID-19-related mortality rates in the United States, Latin America, and the Republic of Korea. He is fluent in English and Spanish.

Professor Arturo Vargas Bustamante

Arturo Vargas Bustamante is an associate professor of health policy and management with the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and has extensive research experience in the United States and Mexico. His research focuses on access to and use of health care among Latinos/Hispanics and immigrants in the United States. He also specializes in the comparative analyses of health care delivery systems in Latin American countries. Along with teaching and research at UCLA, his public service includes work as the Director of Faculty Research at the Latino Politics and Policy Initiative at UCLA. He is fluent in English and Spanish.

Professor & Dean Ronald Brookmeyer

Ronald Brookmeyer is professor of biostatistics and dean of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, with expertise in the modeling of epidemics, simulation studies of spread of infectious diseases, estimating the incubation period of disease, the design of vaccine and therapeutic trials, and the quality and completeness of data and statistics of disease surveillance. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine of the (U.S.) National Academy of Sciences, and has served on task forces for the World Health Organization (WHO). 

Professor David Eisenman

Dr. David Eisenman, is director of the Center for Public Health and Disasters and professor-in-residence of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. Eisenman is also a professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. His work addresses community resilience, mental health in primary care, trauma, climate change, and violence prevention. 

Professor Jonathan Fielding 

Dr. Jonathan Fielding is currently a Distinguished Professor of Health Policy and Management and of Pediatrics in the Schools of Public Health and Medicine at UCLA. Previously, he served for 16 years as Public Health Director and Health Officer for Los Angeles County. A founding member of the U.S. Clinical Preventive Services Task Force, Dr. Fielding currently chairs the U.S. Task Force on Community Preventive Services, and was appointed by President Barack Obama to the National Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion and Integrative and Public Health. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine. He currently (March 24) serves as co-chair of the International WELL Building Institute (IWBI)’s COVID-19 Task Force, helping define the critical role buildings, organizations and communities play in prevention and preparedness, resilience and recovery. 

Professor Chandra Ford

Chandra Ford is director of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health’s Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health and associate professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences. Her expertise includes health equity and disparities; social inequalities, including poverty; mistrust of the healthcare system and HIV-related conspiracy beliefs, racism and racism-related factors, and vulnerable populations (e.g., LGBT). She has served on research and policy projects with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, and the American Public Health Association. 

Professor Gilbert Gee

Gilbert Gee is a professor of community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. A primary line of Gee's research focuses on conceptualizing and measuring racial discrimination, and in understanding how discrimination may be related to illness. His work on health surveys and disease exposure has been recognized by the (U.S.) National Institutes of Health and the Environmental Protection Agency.  

Professor Jody Heymann

Dr. Jody Heymann is founding director of the WORLD Policy Analysis Center and served as dean of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health from 2013-2018. She is a distinguished professor at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, the David M. Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs. She is an elected member of the U. S. National Academy of Medicine and the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences, and has worked with the World Health Organization, the International Labor Organization, the World Economic Forum, UNICEF, and UNESCO. 

Professor Richard J. Jackson

Dr. Richard Jackson is professor emeritus in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. He has served in many leadership positions, including as the head of the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) in the role of State Public Health Officer from 2004-05. He was the founder of the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, now at CalEPA, and for three years he led CDPH’s Infectious Disease Division. Early in his career, Jackson served as an officer in the Epidemic Intelligence Service at CDC, and later served for nine years as Director of the CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health. The Center included emergency response, the National Pharmaceutical Stockpile, the environmental laboratories, and numerous other activities; he was the lead for these activities on September 11, 2001.  A UCSF trained physician, pediatrician, and epidemiologist, he received the Presidential Distinguished Service award for his work at CDC. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. 

Professor Michael Jerrett

Michael Jerrett is a professor of environmental health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. He is an internationally recognized expert in the use of Geographic Information Science (GIS) for exposure assessment and spatial epidemiology, including air quality and the impact of disease in areas with poor air quality. He is professor and immediate past chair of the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at UCLA FSPH, and has served on research projects and advisory committees for the (U.S.) National Academy of Science and the Environmental Protection Agency. 

Professor Robert J. Kim-Farley

Dr. Robert J. Kim-Farley serves as professor-in-residence of epidemiology and community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. His previous roles include director of the Division of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, and service with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the World Health Organization in Indonesia, India, and Switzerland. Kim-Farley addresses public health preparedness for, and response to, deliberate use of biological agents, and reduction and eradication of communicable diseases. 

Professor Randall Kuhn

Randall Kuhn is a demographer and sociologist with the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health who serves as an associate professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences and as an expert with the UCLA California Center for Population Research. His expertise includes the demography of vulnerable populations, including the aging and the homeless, global health, immigrant health, and health surveillance programs. 

Professor Vickie M. Mays

Vickie M. Mays is a distinguished professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and of psychology at the UCLA College of Letters and Science. As a clinical psychologist trained in disaster and emergency response, and who spent five years helping rebuild New Orleans’ mental health capacity and workforce after Katrina, Mays' work has centered on training and community capacity to assist and respond during emergencies and in disasters. Her efforts have centered on ensuring equity, access and addressing discrimination in vulnerable population in response to disasters, and on addressing the human side of closures, isolation, social-distancing and quarantine for adherence to these directives. 

Professor Karin Michels 

Karin Michels is professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, and has wide experience in epidemiology, disease prevention, public health, and statistical methods. In the context of COVID-19, Professor Michels has particular expertise in international comparisons, prevention measures, and future prediction models, and is researching how the pandemic has developed in multiple countries in Europe and Asia, including Germany, Italy, and the Republic of Korea. She is fluent in English and German. 

Professor Anne Rimoin

Anne Rimoin, professor of epidemiology at the UCLA  Fielding School of Public Health, is an expert in emerging infectious diseases, ebolavirus, zoonoses, immunization, and infectious disease epidemiology. Rimoin is the founder of the UCLA-DRC Health Research and Training Program in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and serves as director of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health's Center for Global and Immigrant Health. She is fluent in English and French.

Professor Zuo-Feng Zhang

Dr. Zuo-Feng Zhang is the associate dean for research and a professor of epidemiology at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. Zhang’s service includes his tenure as WHO Consultant for National Noncommunicable Disease Prevention and Controls in China, and as a regular member of NIH Epidemiology of Cancer Study Section. He is fluent in English and Chinese (Mandarin).

 




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Released: 11-May-2021 3:55 PM EDT
Pregnant Women Hospitalized for Covid-19 Infection Do Not Face Increased Risk of Death
University of Maryland Medical Center

Pregnant women who develop severe COVID-19 infections that require hospitalization for pneumonia and other complications may not be more likely to die from these infections than non-pregnant women. In fact, they may have significantly lower death rates than their non-pregnant counterparts.

Released: 11-May-2021 3:45 PM EDT
This stinks: New research finds sense of smell and pneumonia linked
Michigan State University

An acute loss of smell is one of the most common symptoms of COVID-19, but for two decades it has been linked to other maladies among them Parkinson’s disease and dementia. Now, a poor sense of smell may signify a higher risk of pneumonia in older adults, says a team of Michigan State University researchers.

Released: 11-May-2021 3:15 PM EDT
How to predict severe influenza in hospitalised patients
University of Melbourne

Published today in Nature Communications, the team from the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity (Doherty Institute), Alfred Health and Monash University sought to understand which patients would recover quickly from influenza and which would become severely ill.

Newswise: Five benefits of getting a COVID-19 vaccine
Released: 11-May-2021 2:50 PM EDT
Five benefits of getting a COVID-19 vaccine
University of Alabama at Birmingham

UAB experts explain some of the benefits of getting a COVID-19 vaccine.

Newswise: Covid-19 Alters Gray Matter Volume in the Brain, New Study Shows
Released: 11-May-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Covid-19 Alters Gray Matter Volume in the Brain, New Study Shows
Georgia Institute of Technology

Study led by researchers at Georgia State University and Georgia Institute of Technology finds lower gray matter volume in the northern region of the brain is associated with a higher level of disability among Covid-19 patients, even six months after hospital discharge.

Released: 11-May-2021 10:15 AM EDT
How to Win Over Vaccine Skeptics: Live Expert Panel for May 20, 3pm ET
Newswise

How to Win Over Vaccine Skeptics: Live Expert Panel for May 20, 3pm ET

Newswise:Video Embedded simulating-sneezes-and-coughs-to-show-how-covid-19-spreads
VIDEO
Released: 11-May-2021 10:10 AM EDT
Simulating sneezes and coughs to show how COVID-19 spreads
Sandia National Laboratories

Two groups of researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have published papers on the droplets of liquid sprayed by coughs or sneezes and how far they can travel under different conditions. Both teams used Sandia’s decades of experience with advanced computer simulations studying how liquids and gases move for its nuclear stockpile stewardship mission.

Released: 11-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
COVID-19 Wastewater Testing Proves Effective in New Study
University of Virginia Health System

Wastewater testing is an effective way to identify new cases of COVID-19 in nursing homes and other congregate living settings, and it may be particularly useful for preventing outbreaks in college dormitories, a new University of Virginia study finds.

Newswise: Hackensack Meridian Mountainside Medical Center to Start Post-COVID-19 Rehabilitation Program
Released: 11-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Hackensack Meridian Mountainside Medical Center to Start Post-COVID-19 Rehabilitation Program
Hackensack Meridian Health

Mountainside Medical Center will begin a new Post-COVID exercise program designed for those who have had COVID-19 to improve strength, flexibility, endurance and activities of daily living. The program goal is to improve quality of life and promote lifestyle changes through education and exercise.


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