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University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health faculty experts available for media covering novel coronavirus (COVID-19)

Newswise — UCLA Fielding School of Public Health experts available for media covering novel coronavirus (COVID-19) include:

Dr. Robert J. Kim-Farley serves as professor-in-residence of epidemiology and community health sciences at the Fielding School. His previous roles include director of the Division of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, and service with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the World Health Organization in Indonesia, India, and Switzerland. Kim-Farley addresses public health preparedness for, and response to, deliberate use of biological agents, and reduction and eradication of communicable diseases. Recently quoted by The Guardian, Los Angeles Times, and National Public Radio.

Anne Rimoin, a professor of epidemiology at the Fielding School, is an expert in emerging infectious diseases, ebolavirus, zoonoses, immunization, and infectious disease epidemiology. Rimoin is the founder of the UCLA-DRC Health Research and Training Program in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and serves as director of the Center for Global and Immigrant Health at the Fielding School. Recently quoted by the BBC News, Forbes, Fox Business, and USA Today.

Gilbert Gee is a professor of community health sciences at the Fielding School. A primary line of his research focuses on conceptualizing and measuring racial discrimination, and in understanding how discrimination may be related to illness. His work on health surveys and disease exposure has been recognized by the (U.S.) National Institutes of Health and the Environmental Protection Agency. Recently quoted in PBS: Christiane Amanpour & Co., the Los Angeles Times, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, and Seattle Times.

Dr. Zuo-Feng Zhang is the associate dean for research and a professor of epidemiology at the Fielding School. Zhang’s service includes his tenure as WHO Consultant for National Noncommunicable Disease Prevention and Controls in China, and as a regular member of NIH Epidemiology of Cancer Study Section. Recently quoted by Xinhua, China Philanthropist, and The Intellectual.

Dr. Timothy Brewer, professor of epidemiology at the Fielding School, has served on advisory boards and review panels for international and national organizations including the World Health Organization, the National Institutes of Health, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, among others, and currently serves as the Chair of the Board of Directors for the Consortium of Universities for Global Health. Recently quoted in the New York Times and Los Angeles Times.

Dr. David Eisenman, is director of the Center for Public Health and Disasters and professor-in-residence of community health sciences at the Fielding School. Eisenman’s work addresses community resilience, mental health in primary care, trauma, climate change, and violence prevention. Recently quoted in the New York Times.

Dr. Jeffrey Klausner is an adjunct professor of epidemiology at the Fielding School whose research interests are in applied epidemiology and the prevention and control of infectious diseases of public health importance like HIV, STDs, TB and Cryptococcus. Klausner previously served with the San Francisco County Department of Public Health and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recently quoted in the Los Angeles Times and by Fox News Los Angeles.

On Feb. 10, the Fielding School hosted a symposium on COVID-19 titled “What do we know and what’s next?” Speakers included faculty from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, the UCLA School of Law, and  the UCLA Center for Chinese Studies. A video of the event is NOVEL CORONAVIRUS: WHAT DO WE KNOW AND WHAT’S NEXT?:




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10-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Long-term strategies to control COVID-19 pandemic must treat health and economy as equally important, argue researchers
University of Cambridge

Strategies for the safe reopening of low and middle-income countries (LMICs) from months of strict social distancing in response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic must recognise that preserving people’s health is as important as reviving the economy, argue an international team of researchers.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Simple blood test can predict severity of COVID-19 for some patients
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

An early prognosis factor that could be a key to determining who will suffer greater effects from COVID-19, and help clinicians better prepare for these patients, may have been uncovered by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). Results of the findings were published today in the International Journal of Laboratory Hematology.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Genetic ‘fingerprints’ of first COVID-19 cases help manage pandemic
University of Sydney

A new study published in the world-leading journal Nature Medicine, reveals how genomic sequencing and mathematical modelling gave important insights into the ‘parentage’ of cases and likely spread of the disease in New South Wales.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Our itch to share helps spread COVID-19 misinformation
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

To stay current about the Covid-19 pandemic, people need to process health information when they read the news. Inevitably, that means people will be exposed to health misinformation, too, in the form of false content, often found online, about the illness.

Newswise: Pandemic Inspires Framework for Enhanced Care in Nursing Homes
Released: 10-Jul-2020 12:25 PM EDT
Pandemic Inspires Framework for Enhanced Care in Nursing Homes
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

As of May 2020, nursing home residents account for a staggering one-third of the more than 80,000 deaths due to COVID-19 in the U.S. This pandemic has resulted in unprecedented threats—like reduced access to resources needed to contain and eliminate the spread of the virus—to achieving and sustaining care quality even in the best nursing homes. Active engagement of nursing home leaders in developing solutions responsive to the unprecedented threats to quality standards of care delivery is required.

Newswise: General Electric Healthcare Chooses UH to Clinically 
Evaluate First-of-its-kind Imaging System
Released: 10-Jul-2020 12:15 PM EDT
General Electric Healthcare Chooses UH to Clinically Evaluate First-of-its-kind Imaging System
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center physicians completed evaluation for the GE Healthcare Critical Care Suite, and the technology is now in daily clinical practice – flagging between seven to 15 collapsed lungs per day within the hospital. No one on the team could have predicted the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, but this technology and future research with GEHC may enhance the capability to improve care for COVID-19 patients in the ICU. Critical Care Suite is now assisting in COVID and non-COVID patient care as the AMX 240 travels to intensive care units within the hospital.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 11:50 AM EDT
COVID-19 Can Be Transmitted in the Womb, Reports Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

A baby girl in Texas – born prematurely to a mother with COVID-19 – is the strongest evidence to date that intrauterine (in the womb) transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can occur, reports The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, the official journal of The European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 9:45 AM EDT
How COVID-19 Shifted Inpatient Imaging Utilization
Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute

As medical resources shifted away from elective and non-urgent procedures toward emergent and critical care of COVID-19 patients, departments were forced to reconfigure their personnel and resources. In particular, many Radiology practices rescheduled non-urgent and routine imaging according to recommendations from the American College of Radiology (ACR). This new Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute study, published online in the Journal of American College of Radiology (JACR), evaluates the change in the inpatient imaging volumes and composition mix during the COVID-19 pandemic within a large healthcare system.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Team is first in Texas to investigate convalescent plasma for prevention of COVID-19 onset and progression
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

A research team is the first in Texas to investigate whether plasma from COVID-19 survivors can be used in outpatient settings to prevent the onset and progression of the virus in two new clinical trials at UTHealth.


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