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University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health faculty experts available for media covering novel coronavirus (COVID-19)

Newswise — UCLA Fielding School of Public Health experts available for media covering novel coronavirus (COVID-19) include:

Dr. Robert J. Kim-Farley serves as professor-in-residence of epidemiology and community health sciences at the Fielding School. His previous roles include director of the Division of Communicable Disease Control and Prevention at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, and service with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the World Health Organization in Indonesia, India, and Switzerland. Kim-Farley addresses public health preparedness for, and response to, deliberate use of biological agents, and reduction and eradication of communicable diseases. Recently quoted by The Guardian, Los Angeles Times, and National Public Radio.

Anne Rimoin, a professor of epidemiology at the Fielding School, is an expert in emerging infectious diseases, ebolavirus, zoonoses, immunization, and infectious disease epidemiology. Rimoin is the founder of the UCLA-DRC Health Research and Training Program in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and serves as director of the Center for Global and Immigrant Health at the Fielding School. Recently quoted by the BBC News, Forbes, Fox Business, and USA Today.

Gilbert Gee is a professor of community health sciences at the Fielding School. A primary line of his research focuses on conceptualizing and measuring racial discrimination, and in understanding how discrimination may be related to illness. His work on health surveys and disease exposure has been recognized by the (U.S.) National Institutes of Health and the Environmental Protection Agency. Recently quoted in PBS: Christiane Amanpour & Co., the Los Angeles Times, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, and Seattle Times.

Dr. Zuo-Feng Zhang is the associate dean for research and a professor of epidemiology at the Fielding School. Zhang’s service includes his tenure as WHO Consultant for National Noncommunicable Disease Prevention and Controls in China, and as a regular member of NIH Epidemiology of Cancer Study Section. Recently quoted by Xinhua, China Philanthropist, and The Intellectual.

Dr. Timothy Brewer, professor of epidemiology at the Fielding School, has served on advisory boards and review panels for international and national organizations including the World Health Organization, the National Institutes of Health, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, among others, and currently serves as the Chair of the Board of Directors for the Consortium of Universities for Global Health. Recently quoted in the New York Times and Los Angeles Times.

Dr. David Eisenman, is director of the Center for Public Health and Disasters and professor-in-residence of community health sciences at the Fielding School. Eisenman’s work addresses community resilience, mental health in primary care, trauma, climate change, and violence prevention. Recently quoted in the New York Times.

Dr. Jeffrey Klausner is an adjunct professor of epidemiology at the Fielding School whose research interests are in applied epidemiology and the prevention and control of infectious diseases of public health importance like HIV, STDs, TB and Cryptococcus. Klausner previously served with the San Francisco County Department of Public Health and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recently quoted in the Los Angeles Times and by Fox News Los Angeles.

On Feb. 10, the Fielding School hosted a symposium on COVID-19 titled “What do we know and what’s next?” Speakers included faculty from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, the UCLA School of Law, and  the UCLA Center for Chinese Studies. A video of the event is NOVEL CORONAVIRUS: WHAT DO WE KNOW AND WHAT’S NEXT?:




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Released: 13-Aug-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Additive Manufacturing for COVID-19
Materials Research Society (MRS)

A new Prospective article—Additive Manufacturing for COVID-19: Devices, Materials, Prospects and Challenges—published in MRS Communications, looks at these critical supply issues and provides an overview of 3D printing and how coupling the tools in additive manufacturing (AM) and advanced materials has provided a viable alternative for rapid production and distribution of PPEs and medical devices.

Newswise: Busting Up the Infection Cycle of Hepatitis B
Released: 13-Aug-2020 12:50 PM EDT
Busting Up the Infection Cycle of Hepatitis B
University of Delaware

Researchers at the University of Delaware have gained new understanding of the virus that causes hepatitis B and the “spiky ball” that encloses the virus’s genetic blueprint. They examined how the capsid—a protein shell that protects the blueprint and also drives the delivery of it to infect a host cell—assembles itself. Scientists believe that the capsid is an important target in developing drugs to treat hepatitis B, a life-threatening and incurable infection that afflicts more than 250 million people worldwide.

Newswise: 240097_web.jpg
Released: 13-Aug-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Stay-at-home orders significantly associated with reduced spread of COVID-19, study finds
Brown University

Across the globe, COVID-19 has infected more than 18 million people to date and has killed hundreds of thousands -- and the United States has been hit especially hard.

Released: 13-Aug-2020 11:45 AM EDT
COVID-19 Symptom Tracker Ensures Privacy During Isolation
Georgetown University Medical Center

An online COVID-19 symptom tracking tool developed by researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center ensures a person’s confidentiality while being able to actively monitor their symptoms. The tool is not proprietary and can be used by entities that are not able to develop their own tracking systems.

Newswise: Support for telehealth and mobile health monitoring rises since COVID, study says
Released: 13-Aug-2020 11:25 AM EDT
Support for telehealth and mobile health monitoring rises since COVID, study says
University of Alabama Huntsville

Support for telehealth and mobile health monitoring has risen among healthcare workers and consumers since the rise of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study. Dr. Emil Jovanov, a pioneer in the wearable health monitoring field from The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), participated and was a coauthor.

Newswise: Americans actively engaging in collectivism as financial buoy, experts say
Released: 13-Aug-2020 11:25 AM EDT
Americans actively engaging in collectivism as financial buoy, experts say
University of Notre Dame

Karen Richman, University of Notre Dame director of undergraduate studies at the Institute for Latino Studies, and her colleague, found that many people in the U.S. are relying on informal networks of family and friends to stay afloat in a recent study.

Newswise: 240116_web.jpg
Released: 13-Aug-2020 11:20 AM EDT
Researchers identify a protein that may help SARS-CoV-2 spread rapidly through cells
Colorado State University

Eric Ross and Sean Cascarina, biochemistry and molecular biology researchers at Colorado State University, have released a research paper identifying a protein encoded by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, that may be associated with the quick spread of the virus through cells in the human body.

Newswise: 240119_web.jpg
Released: 13-Aug-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Public health consequences of policing homelessness
University of Colorado Denver

Two weeks ago, Colorado State Patrol troopers began clearing out nearly 200 residents from homeless encampments that surround the Colorado Capitol.

Released: 13-Aug-2020 10:35 AM EDT
Age discrimination seen @Twitter during #COVID19 pandemic
University of Michigan

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a perfect storm for age discrimination on social media.

Released: 13-Aug-2020 10:15 AM EDT
New COVID-19 Model Reveals Need for Better Travel Restriction Implementation
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

More strategic and coordinated travel restrictions could have reduced the spread of COVID-19 in the early stages of the pandemic, data confirms. The conclusion, available in preprint on MedRxiv, an online repository of papers that have been screened but not peer reviewed, stems from new modeling conducted by a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.


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