American Educational Research Association (AERA)

William F. Tate IV, National Expert on the Intersections Between Education, Society, and Public Health, to Examine the “Segregation Pandemic” at 2020 AERA Brown Lecture

The American Educational Research Association is holding the 17th Annual Brown Lecture in Education Research on October 22 from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. EDT. The event, which will be held virtually, is free and open to the public. ASL and closed captioning will be provided. Register here. 

What

This year’s lecture, titled “The Segregation Pandemic: Brown as Treatment or Placebo?,” will be delivered by William F. Tate IV. A moderated discussion forum will follow Tate’s talk with an opportunity for audience Q&A. 

About Tate’s Lecture:

A pandemic is an epidemic occurring on a scale that crosses the globe. A condition is not a pandemic merely because it exists in different regions of the world or results in the death of many people; it must also be infectious. In this lecture, Tate will argue that over the past 500 years, by way of mutually reinforcing regimes consisting of politicians, intellectuals, religious supporters, business leaders, and others, an ideology of a racial biology “infected” the world, causing a disease to spread in global fashion. Tate will draw on his own research and a body of other scientific evidence, to show how the disease fed on a rhetoric that assigned biological superiority to certain races and how a pandemic of segregation resulted. Tate will explore Brown through the lens of a medical model and its various pervasive effects on society and education. 

Who

William F. Tate IV, provost and executive vice president of academic affairs at the University of South Carolina, is a leading expert on the intersections between education, society, and public health. Tate holds the University of South Carolina Educational Foundation Distinguished Professorship, with appointments in sociology and family and preventive medicine. 

Tate’s research has focused on human capital development in STEM fields; epidemiological models and geospatial applications with a focus on adolescent and child development and health outcomes; social development of youth in metropolitan communities; and social stratification. Tate is an AERA past president (2007–08) and an AERA Fellow. He is also an elected member of the National Academy of Education. Read more

When

Thursday, October 22, 2020, 6:00-7:30 PM EDT.

Where

The event will be held virtually. Register here.

Additional Details  

The event is free and open to the public. ASL and closed captioning will be provided.

The hashtag for the 17th Brown Lecture is #AERABrownLecture. Stay up-to-date with upcoming events on AERA’s FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

About the Brown Lecture:

The Brown Lecture illuminates the important role of research in advancing understanding of equality and equity in education. The Brown Lecture was inaugurated by AERA in 2004 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education decision, in which the U.S. Supreme Court took scientific research into account in issuing its landmark ruling. Each year a leading scholar notable for producing significant research related to equality in education is invited to give this public lecture in Washington, D.C.

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About AERA
The American Educational Research Association (AERA) is the largest national interdisciplinary research association devoted to the scientific study of education and learning. Founded in 1916, AERA advances knowledge about education, encourages scholarly inquiry related to education, and promotes the use of research to improve education and serve the public good. Find AERA on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.




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