American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO)

Your Ophthalmologist is Ready to See You

What to expect when you return to the doctor’s office

Newswise — SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. – May 21, 2020 – We can’t tell you when it will be safe to go back to the hair salon, when the kids will return to school or when you can hug your grandparents again. But we can say that your next trip to the ophthalmologist will be different. That’s because ophthalmologists are devising new office procedures to prevent the spread of COVID-19. As all 50 states begin to reopen to some degree, the American Academy of Ophthalmology wants to share how ophthalmologists are working to protect their patients and staff. 

In March, the Academy urged ophthalmologists to immediately stop routine surgical and in-office visits to preserve protective equipment such as masks and to mitigate the risk of spreading COVID-19, the illness caused by the novel coronavirus. Although the Academy made a national recommendation to curtail routine care —based on recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and public health officials—the decisions to reopen more normal practice will be local and regional. 

Ophthalmologists are ready with new procedures. Here is what you should expect to see:

  • The clinic may ask you to wait outside, or in your car, instead of in the normal waiting room. This is to protect you, the other patients, and the office staff from possible virus exposure in crowded waiting areas.
  • The clinic is likely to restrict the number of people who enter. If you do not need someone to be there with you, do not bring anyone to your appointment.
  • Expect to see hand sanitizer when you enter the building and in the waiting room and exam rooms.
  • Expect to be asked to wear a mask. Here’s a video on how to properly put on and take off your mask. You won’t be alone. The receptionists, as well as all visitors should wear a mask.
  • Waiting room chairs will be spaced out to accommodate social distancing. The office may also have additional waiting rooms to prevent crowding.
  • You will not see magazines or clipboards or other high-touch materials that could pass the virus.
  • Cleaning will occur more frequently throughout the clinic.
  • As usual, exam rooms and equipment will be thoroughly cleaned after every patient exits.
  • Expect to be asked a series of questions to determine your risk profile.
  • Expect someone will take your temperature, whether you are at high risk of being infected or not.
  • Your eye doctor may use a special plastic breath shield on the slit lamp machine they use to look into your eyes. They may also wear a mask with a plastic shield over their eyes.
  • Your doctor may ask you to wait to speak until after your eye exam is complete. Then they can talk with you and answer questions when they can be a safe distance from you.
  • There is a backlog of patients who delayed care, so you may have to wait for your appointment. Also, the additional precautions required in operating rooms will likely result in fewer surgeries performed each day.

“Our primary responsibility as physicians is to our patients’ safety and health,” said Dianna Seldomridge, MD, clinical spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology. “It’s the core of the medical profession. If you have questions or concerns about coming into the office, give your ophthalmologist a call. As always we will be guided by what’s best for you.”

About the American Academy of Ophthalmology

The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons. A global community of 32,000 medical doctors, we protect sight and empower lives by setting the standards for ophthalmic education and advocating for our patients and the public. We innovate to advance our profession and to ensure the delivery of the highest-quality eye care. Our EyeSmart® program provides the public with the most trusted information about eye health. For more information, visit aao.org.



Filters close

Showing results

1120 of 5809
Released: 10-Jun-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Study Identifies How COVID-19 Linked to Alzheimer’s Disease-like Cognitive Impairment
Cleveland Clinic

A new Cleveland Clinic-led study has identified mechanisms by which COVID-19 can lead to Alzheimer’s disease-like dementia. The findings, published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, indicate an overlap between COVID-19 and brain changes common in Alzheimer’s, and may help inform risk management and therapeutic strategies for COVID-19-associated cognitive impairment.

Released: 10-Jun-2021 3:25 PM EDT
5 Leadership Strategies for Better Adapting in a Crisis
University of Maryland, Robert H. Smith School of Business

Maryland Smith management expert and futurist Oliver Schlake describes how companies can prepare for the next crisis as the economy gradually emerges from the COVID-19 pandemic.

7-Jun-2021 2:30 PM EDT
COVID-19 Creates Hearing, Balance Disorders, Aggravates Tinnitus Symptoms
Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Evidence suggests auditory and vestibular effects should be added to the growing list of physiological impacts of COVID-19. During the 180th Meeting, Colleen Le Prell from the University of Texas at Dallas will talk about hearing and balance disorders associated with coronavirus infection and how pandemic-related stress and anxiety may aggravate tinnitus symptoms. Her presentation, "Hearing disorders secondary to infection with SARS-CoV-2," will take place Thursday, June 10.

Released: 10-Jun-2021 10:55 AM EDT
NCCN Cancer Experts Answer Questions about COVID-19 Vaccines
National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

National Comprehensive Cancer Network’s patient information team provides a patient and caregiver version of recently-updated, evidence-based expert consensus recommendations for vaccinating people with cancer against COVID-19.

Newswise:Video Embedded doe-scientists-deploy-creativity-speed-to-disrupt-covid-19
VIDEO
Released: 10-Jun-2021 9:00 AM EDT
DOE scientists deploy creativity, speed to disrupt COVID-19
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

An ORNL-led team comprising researchers from multiple DOE national laboratories is using artificial intelligence and computational screening techniques – in combination with experimental validation – to identify and design five promising drug therapy approaches to target the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

Released: 10-Jun-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Warmer temperatures lessen COVID-19 spread, but control measures still needed
Imperial College London

New research shows transmission of the virus behind COVID-19 varies seasonally, but warmer conditions are not enough to prevent transmission.

8-Jun-2021 12:45 PM EDT
Monoclonal antibody therapy for COVID-19 safe, effective for transplant patients
Mayo Clinic

Treating transplant patients with mild to moderate cases of COVID-19 with monoclonal antibodies is safe and helps prevent serious illness, according to a Mayo Clinic study recently published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases. These results are especially important because transplant patients who are infected with COVID-19 have a higher risk of severe illness and death.

4-Jun-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Study Examines COVID-19 Among Patients Receiving Home Dialysis
American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

• Patients with kidney failure who are undergoing dialysis—whether at dialysis clinics or at home—face a higher risk of developing COVID-19 and a higher risk of dying from the disease.

4-Jun-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Immune Responses After COVID-19 Vaccination in Kidney Transplant Recipients and Patients on Dialysis
American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

• A large majority of patients with kidney failure on dialysis—but not kidney transplant recipients—developed antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 after COVID-19 vaccination. • Vaccination also led to strong T cell responses against the virus that causes COVID-19 in all patients on dialysis, and in nearly 58% of kidney transplant recipients.

Newswise: New treatment demonstrated for people with vaccine clots
8-Jun-2021 10:50 AM EDT
New treatment demonstrated for people with vaccine clots
McMaster University

The treatment’s effectiveness was described in a report describing three Canadian patients who received the AstraZeneca vaccine, and who subsequently developed VITT. Two suffered clotting in their legs and the third had clots blocking arteries and veins inside their brain.


Showing results

1120 of 5809

close
5.22576