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    Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, October 2019

    Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, October 2019

    ORNL story tips: Reaching the boiling point for HVACs; showcasing innovation for technology transfer; using neutrons to lend insight into human tissue; and heating the core in a fusion prototype experiment.

    Chromosome Connectors Take Center Stage for ORNL Scientists Studying Poplar

    Chromosome Connectors Take Center Stage for ORNL Scientists Studying Poplar

    An Oak Ridge National Laboratory team mapped the locations of centromeres in Populus trichocarpa (poplar), and a subsequent analysis on the Titan supercomputer showed that genetic variants in the DNA sequence at the centromere and the sequence of a protein structure this DNA wraps around show similar occurrence patterns.

    How long does memory last? For shape memory alloys, the longer the better

    How long does memory last? For shape memory alloys, the longer the better

    Ames Laboratory researchers heated shape memory alloys inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM), so that they could observe phase transitions in real time. The information could lead to more reliable SMAs for applications.

    Supercomputing, neutrons unite to unravel structures of intrinsically disordered protein

    Supercomputing, neutrons unite to unravel structures of intrinsically disordered protein

    Using the Titan supercomputer and the Spallation Neutron Source at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, scientists have created the most accurate 3D model yet of an intrinsically disordered protein, revealing the ensemble of its atomic-level structures.

    Argonne National Laboratory to Join ATOM to Transform Drug Discovery with Artificial Intelligence

    Argonne National Laboratory to Join ATOM to Transform Drug Discovery with Artificial Intelligence

    Argonne to become newest member of Accelerating Therapeutics for Opportunities in Medicine (ATOM) consortium.

    ORNL scientists shed light on microbial 'dark matter' with new approach

    ORNL scientists shed light on microbial 'dark matter' with new approach

    Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have demonstrated a way to isolate and grow targeted bacteria using genomic data, making strides toward resolving the grand challenge of uncultivated microbial "dark matter" in which the vast majority of microorganisms remain unstudied in the laboratory.

    Scientists finally find superconductivity in exactly the place they have been looking for decades

    Scientists finally find superconductivity in exactly the place they have been looking for decades

    SLAC and Stanford scientists prove a well-known model of material behavior applies to high-temperature superconductors, giving them a new tool for understanding how these weird materials conduct electricity with no loss.

    Shocking heat waves stabilize single atoms

    Shocking heat waves stabilize single atoms

    Single atom catalysts are highly desirable, but difficult to stabilize. Argonne scientists are part of a team that is using repeated high temperature shockwaves to synthesize high-stability and high-efficiency single atom catalysts.

    Researchers home in on extremely rare nuclear process

    Researchers home in on extremely rare nuclear process

    A hypothetical nuclear process known as neutrinoless double beta decay ought to be among the least likely events in the universe. Now the international EXO-200 collaboration, which includes researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, has determined just how unlikely it is: In a given volume of a certain xenon isotope, it would take more than 35 trillion trillion years for half of its nuclei to decay through this process - an eternity compared to the age of the universe, which is "only" 13 billion years old.

    ORNL develops, deploys AI capabilities across research portfolio

    ORNL develops, deploys AI capabilities across research portfolio

    To accelerate promising artificial intelligence applications in diverse research fields, ORNL has established a labwide AI Initiative. This internal investment brings the lab's AI expertise, computing resources and user facilities together to facilitate analyses of massive datasets.

    Seeing sound: Scientists observe how acoustic interactions change materials at the atomic level

    Seeing sound: Scientists observe how acoustic interactions change materials at the atomic level

    By using sound waves, scientists have begun to explore fundamental stress behaviors in a crystalline material that could form the basis for quantum information technologies.

    Today's forecast: How to predict crucial plasma pressure in future fusion facilities

    Today's forecast: How to predict crucial plasma pressure in future fusion facilities

    Feature describes improved model for forecasting the crucial balance of pressure at the edge of a fusion plasma.

    Science Snapshots: messenger proteins, new TB drug, artificial photosynthesis

    Science Snapshots: messenger proteins, new TB drug, artificial photosynthesis

    Science Snapshots: messenger proteins, new TB drug, artificial photosynthesis

    Plastics, Fuels and Chemical Feedstocks From CO2? They're Working on It

    Plastics, Fuels and Chemical Feedstocks From CO2? They're Working on It

    Four SUNCAT scientists describe recent research results related to the quest to capture CO2 from the smokestacks of factories and power plants and use renewable energy to turn it into industrial feedstocks and fuels.

    Getting a look under the hood of topological insulators

    Getting a look under the hood of topological insulators

    Because of topological insulators' unique electronic properties and their potential use in spintronic devices and even conceivably as transistors for quantum computers, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory investigated the dynamics of the conducting surface electrons in these materials.

    New Investigation Cuts Through the Haze Surrounding "Smoke-Free" Tobacco Products

    New Investigation Cuts Through the Haze Surrounding "Smoke-Free" Tobacco Products

    Marketed as a healthier alternative to cigarettes, a new class of tobacco products called heat-not-burn devices is quickly gaining in popularity across the globe. A study by Berkeley Lab's Indoor Environment Group shows that

    Scientists couple magnetization to superconductivity for quantum discoveries

    Scientists couple magnetization to superconductivity for quantum discoveries

    In a recent study, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have created a miniaturized chip-based superconducting circuit that couples quantum waves of magnetic spins called magnons to photons of equivalent energy.

    Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, September 2019

    Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, September 2019

    ORNL story tips: ORNL's project for VA bridges computing prowess, VA health data to speed up suicide risk screenings for U.S. veterans; ORNL reveals ionic liquid additive lubricates better than additives in commercial gear oil; researchers use neutron scattering to probe colorful new material that could improve sensors, vivid displays; unique 3D printing approach adds more strength, toughness in certain materials.

    Study Reveals 'Radical' Wrinkle in Forming Complex Carbon Molecules in Space

    Study Reveals 'Radical' Wrinkle in Forming Complex Carbon Molecules in Space

    A team of scientists has discovered a new possible pathway toward forming carbon structures in space using a specialized chemical exploration technique at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source.

    SMART Algorithm Makes Beamline Data Collection Smarter

    SMART Algorithm Makes Beamline Data Collection Smarter

    Researchers in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Center for Advanced Mathematics for Energy Research Applications have been working with beamline scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory to develop and test SMART, a mathematical method that enables autonomous experimental decision making without human interaction.

    The Chemistry of Art: Scientists Explore Aged Paint in Microscopic Detail to Inform Preservation Efforts

    The Chemistry of Art: Scientists Explore Aged Paint in Microscopic Detail to Inform Preservation Efforts

    To learn more about the chemical processes in oil paints that can damage aging artwork, a team led by researchers at the National Gallery of Art and the National Institute of Standards and Technology conducted a range of studies that included 3D X-ray imaging of a paint sample at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source.

    First report of superconductivity in a nickel oxide material

    First report of superconductivity in a nickel oxide material

    Scientists at SLAC and Stanford have made the first nickel oxide material that shows clear signs of superconductivity - the ability to transmit electrical current with no loss. The first in a potential new family of unconventional superconductors, its similarity to the cuprates raises hopes that it can be made to superconduct at relatively high temperatures.

    Smarter Experiments for Faster Materials Discovery

    Smarter Experiments for Faster Materials Discovery

    UPTON, NY - A team of scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory designed, created, and successfully tested a new algorithm to make smarter scientific measurement decisions.

    Enhancing Materials for Hi-Res Patterning to Advance Microelectronics

    Enhancing Materials for Hi-Res Patterning to Advance Microelectronics

    Scientists created organic-inorganic materials for transferring ultrasmall features into silicon with a high aspect ratio.

    Scientists Discover "Electron Equivalents" in Colloidal Systems

    Scientists Discover "Electron Equivalents" in Colloidal Systems

    In new research outlined in a recent issue of Science, scientists tethered smaller particles in colloidal crystals to larger ones using DNA, allowing them to determine how the smaller particles filled in the regions surrounding the larger ones.