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    Scientists Model The "Flicker" of Gluons in Subatomic Smashups

    Scientists Model The "Flicker" of Gluons in Subatomic Smashups

    A new study just published in Physical Review Letters reveals that a high degree of gluon fluctuation--a kind of flickering rearrangement in the distribution of gluon density within individual protons--could help explain some of the remarkable results at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) -- a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility for nuclear physics research at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory -- and also in nuclear physics experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe.

    New Silicon Structures Could Make Better Biointerfaces

    New Silicon Structures Could Make Better Biointerfaces

    A team of researchers have engineered silicon particles one-fiftieth the width of a human hair, which could lead to "biointerface" systems designed to make nerve cells fire and heart cells beat.

    A New Leaf: Scientists Turn Carbon Dioxide Back Into Fuel

    A New Leaf: Scientists Turn Carbon Dioxide Back Into Fuel

    In a new study from Argonne and the University of Illinois at Chicago, researchers have found a way to convert carbon dioxide into a usable energy source.

    Diamonds Help Generate New Record for Static Pressures for Study

    Diamonds Help Generate New Record for Static Pressures for Study

    An international team working at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory has devised a method for achieving 1 terapascal of static pressure - vastly higher than any previously reached.

    ORNL-Led Study Analyzes Electric Grid Vulnerabilities in Extreme Weather Areas

    ORNL-Led Study Analyzes Electric Grid Vulnerabilities in Extreme Weather Areas

    Climate and energy scientists have developed a new method to pinpoint which electrical service areas will be most vulnerable as populations grow and temperatures rise.

    Teasing Out the Microbiome of the Kansas Prairie

    Teasing Out the Microbiome of the Kansas Prairie

    PNNL scientists have untangled a soil metagenome - all the genetic material recovered from a sample of soil - more fully than ever before, reconstructing portions of the genomes of 129 species of microbes. While it's only a tiny proportion of the species in the sample, it's a leap forward for scientists who have had only a fraction of that success to date.

    SLAC X-Ray Studies Help NASA Develop Printable Electronics for Mars Mission

    SLAC X-Ray Studies Help NASA Develop Printable Electronics for Mars Mission

    Plans begin decades in advance for a tremendous effort such as the first manned mission to Mars. The details are as fine - and essential - as how astronauts will breathe and eat and track their health.

    When the Going Gets Tough, the Tough Get Growing

    When the Going Gets Tough, the Tough Get Growing

    While relentless bright light brings many forms of cyanobacteria to their knees - figuratively, of course - Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 does the opposite, thriving and growing at a rate that far outpaces most of its peers. Now researchers know why: It triples in size to accommodate a rapid expansion of the cellular machinery it uses to build proteins.

    All E-Cigarettes Emit Harmful Chemicals, but Some Emit More Than Others

    All E-Cigarettes Emit Harmful Chemicals, but Some Emit More Than Others

    While previous studies have found that electronic cigarettes emit toxic compounds, a new study from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has pinpointed the source of these emissions and shown how factors such as the temperature, type, and age of the device play a role in emission levels, information that could be valuable to both manufacturers and regulators seeking to minimize the health impacts of these increasingly popular devices.

    New Nontoxic Process Promises Larger Ultrathin Sheets of 2D Nanomaterials

    New Nontoxic Process Promises Larger Ultrathin Sheets of 2D Nanomaterials

    Scientists have developed a novel way to produce two-dimensional nanosheets by separating bulk materials with nontoxic liquid nitrogen. The environmentally friendly process generates a 20-fold increase in surface area per sheet, which could expand the nanomaterials' commercial applications.

    Newly Discovered Material Property May Lead to High Temp Superconductivity

    Newly Discovered Material Property May Lead to High Temp Superconductivity

    Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory have discovered an unusual property of purple bronze that may point to new ways to achieve high temperature superconductivity.

    Scientists Harness CO2 to Consolidate Biofuel Production Process

    Scientists Harness CO2 to Consolidate Biofuel Production Process

    JBEI scientists have shown that adding carbon dioxide gas during the deconstruction phase of biofuel production successfully neutralized the toxicity of ionic liquids. The technique, which is reversible, allows the liquid to be recycled, representing a major step forward in streamlining the biofuel production process.

    World's Most Sensitive Dark Matter Detector Completes Search

    World's Most Sensitive Dark Matter Detector Completes Search

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) dark matter experiment, which operates beneath a mile of rock at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in the Black Hills of South Dakota, has completed its search for the missing matter of the universe. Today LUX scientific collaborators, which includes Berkeley Lab, presented the results from the detector's final 20-month run.

    Modern Off-Grid Lighting Could Create 2 Million New Jobs in Developing World

    Modern Off-Grid Lighting Could Create 2 Million New Jobs in Developing World

    Many households in impoverished regions around the world are starting to shift away from inefficient and polluting fuel-based lighting--such as candles, firewood, and kerosene lanterns--to solar-LED systems. While this trend has tremendous environmental benefits, a new study by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has found that it spurs economic development as well, to the tune of 2 million potential new jobs.

    Comparing Fungal Secretions to Uncover Carbon Compound Degradation Pathways

    Comparing Fungal Secretions to Uncover Carbon Compound Degradation Pathways

    Fungal secretomes, those collections of all molecules secreted by a cell, contain enzymes that could help cost-effectively convert plant mass into sustainable transportation fuels. In a July 19, 2016 study in Plos ONE, a comparative analysis of four fungal secretomes revealed more about the variety of pathways employed to break down carbon compounds.

    Scientists Create New Thin Material That Mimics Cell Membranes

    Scientists Create New Thin Material That Mimics Cell Membranes

    Materials scientists have created a new material that performs like a cell membrane found in nature. Such a material has long been sought for applications as varied as water purification and drug delivery. The material can assemble itself into a sheet thinner but stabler than a soap bubble, the researchers report July 12 in Nature Communications.

    New ORNL Tool Probes for Genes Linked to Toxic Methylmercury

    New ORNL Tool Probes for Genes Linked to Toxic Methylmercury

    Environmental scientists can more efficiently detect genes required to convert mercury in the environment into more toxic methylmercury with molecular probes developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

    Scientists Determine Structure of Enzyme Linked with Key Cell-Signaling Protein

    Scientists Determine Structure of Enzyme Linked with Key Cell-Signaling Protein

    Scientists have captured atomic level snapshots showing how one key enzyme modifies a protein involved in turning genes on or off inside cells. Understanding this process helps explain how complex organisms can arise from a finite number of genes. The research also identifies links between defects in this particular enzyme and certain cancers, potentially pointing to new drug targets.

    Dark Energy Measured with Record-Breaking Map of 1.2 Million Galaxies

    Dark Energy Measured with Record-Breaking Map of 1.2 Million Galaxies

    A team of hundreds of physicists and astronomers, including those from Berkeley Lab, have announced results from the largest-ever, three-dimensional map of distant galaxies. The team constructed this map to make one of the most precise measurements yet of the dark energy currently driving the accelerated expansion of the Universe.

    Modeling Predicts Which Counties Could Store More Carbon in Soil by Growing Bioenergy Crops

    Modeling Predicts Which Counties Could Store More Carbon in Soil by Growing Bioenergy Crops

    To help stakeholders in government and business make smart decisions about the best types of land and local climates for planting bioenergy crops, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory are using computational modeling to predict which counties could see increases in soil organic carbon from cultivation of crops for biofuels. The results are contributing to DOE's third Billion-Ton report expected later this year.

    US Holds Potential to Produce Billion Tons of Biomass, Support Bioeconomy

    US Holds Potential to Produce Billion Tons of Biomass, Support Bioeconomy

    The 2016 Billion-Ton Report, jointly released by the U.S. Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, concludes that the United States has the potential to sustainably produce at least 1 billion dry tons of nonfood biomass resources annually by 2040.

    Scientists Optimize Defects for Better Superconducting Effects

    Scientists Optimize Defects for Better Superconducting Effects

    In a new study, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory have developed a rational approach to optimize the arrangement of defects to enhance the current-carrying capacity of commercial high-temperature superconducting wires.

    Berkeley Lab Scientists Grow Atomically Thin Transistors and Circuits

    Berkeley Lab Scientists Grow Atomically Thin Transistors and Circuits

    In an advance that helps pave the way for next-generation electronics and computing technologies--and possibly paper-thin gadgets--scientists with Berkeley Lab developed a way to chemically assemble transistors and circuits that are only a few atoms thick.

    Argonne Partners with Strem Chemicals to Deliver Next-Gen Battery Materials to Industry

    Argonne Partners with Strem Chemicals to Deliver Next-Gen Battery Materials to Industry

    Argonne has teamed up with Strem Chemicals, Inc. to provide industry and the battery research community with next-generation materials that could improve energy storage. Strem has licensed 23 separate pieces of intellectual property from Argonne and will manufacture and distribute nine battery solvents and additives.

    Story Tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, July 2016

    Story Tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, July 2016

    3-D printed heat sinks show promise for higher power densities in electronics; ORNL system allows for inspections of materials on the fly; ORNL scientists advance understanding of superconductivity phenomenon; ORNL leads team that casts further doubt of calcium-52's magic status; Bamboo fiber potentially useful for 3-D-printed materials