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    Permanent magnets far stronger than those on refrigerator doors could be a solution for delivering fusion energy

    Permanent magnets far stronger than those on refrigerator doors could be a solution for delivering fusion energy

    Permanent magnets can, in principle, greatly simplify the design and production of the complex coils of stellarator fusion facilities.

    Feeding fusion: hydrogen ice pellets prove effective for fueling fusion plasmas

    Feeding fusion: hydrogen ice pellets prove effective for fueling fusion plasmas

    Injecting pellets of hydrogen ice rather than puffing hydrogen gas improves fusion performance. Studies by PPPL and ORNL physicists compared the two methods on the DIII-D National Fusion Facility, looking ahead to the injection fueling planned for ITER.

    'Strange' Glimpse into Neutron Stars and Symmetry Violation

    'Strange' Glimpse into Neutron Stars and Symmetry Violation

    New results from precision particle detectors at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) offer a fresh glimpse of the particle interactions that take place in the cores of neutron stars and give nuclear physicists a new way to search for violations of fundamental symmetries in the universe.

    Argonne's pioneering user facility to add magic number factory

    Argonne's pioneering user facility to add magic number factory

    A forthcoming N = 126 Factory will investigate one of the great questions in physics and chemistry: how were the heavy elements from iron to uranium created?

    Terahertz radiation technique opens a new door for studying atomic behavior

    Terahertz radiation technique opens a new door for studying atomic behavior

    Researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have made a promising new advance for the lab's high-speed "electron camera" that could allow them to "film" tiny, ultrafast motions of protons and electrons in chemical reactions that have never been seen before.

    The Complex Biology Behind Your Love (or Hatred) of Coffee

    The Complex Biology Behind Your Love (or Hatred) of Coffee

    Why do some people feel like they need three cups of coffee just to get through the day when others are happy with only one? Why do some people abstain entirely? New research suggests that our intake of coffee - the most popular beverage in America, above bottled water, sodas, tea, and beer - is affected by a positive feedback loop between genetics and the environment.

    Early research on existing drug compounds via supercomputing could combat coronavirus

    Early research on existing drug compounds via supercomputing could combat coronavirus

    Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have used Summit, the world's most powerful and smartest supercomputer, to identify 77 small-molecule drug compounds that might warrant further study in the fight against the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, which is responsible for the COVID-19 disease outbreak.

    The modern electric grid needs smarter modeling for improving resilience, study finds

    The modern electric grid needs smarter modeling for improving resilience, study finds

    Many studies do not adequately consider the two-way nature of this relationship and its impact on grid resilience.

    A Talented 2D Material Gets a New Gig

    A Talented 2D Material Gets a New Gig

    Berkeley Lab scientists tap into graphene's hidden talent as an electrically tunable superconductor, insulator, and magnetic device for the advancement of quantum information science

    New Coronavirus Protein Reveals Drug Target

    New Coronavirus Protein Reveals Drug Target

    A potential drug target has been identified in a newly mapped protein of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The structure was solved by a team including the University of Chicago (U of C), the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine (UCR).

    A joint venture at the nanoscale

    A joint venture at the nanoscale

    Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory report fabricating and testing a superconducting nanowire device applicable to high-speed photon counting. This pivotal invention will allow nuclear physics experiments that were previously thought impossible.

    Scientists pair machine learning with tomography to learn about material interfaces

    Scientists pair machine learning with tomography to learn about material interfaces

    Researchers have put a new technique based on machine learning to work uncovering the secrets of buried interfaces and edges in a material.

    Gold in Limbo Between Solid and Melted States

    Gold in Limbo Between Solid and Melted States

    Laser-induced melting occurs nonuniformly in polycrystalline gold thin films--a finding that may be important for precision part micromachining.

    Story Tips: Antidote chasing, traffic control and automatic modeling

    Story Tips: Antidote chasing, traffic control and automatic modeling

    ORNL's Story Tips: Antidote chasing, traffic control and automatic modeling, for March 2020

    Polymers get caught up in love-hate chemistry of oil and water

    Polymers get caught up in love-hate chemistry of oil and water

    Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee achieved a rare look at the inner workings of polymer self-assembly at an oil-water interface to advance materials for neuromorphic computing and bio-inspired technologies.

    New twist in artificial intelligence could enhance the prediction of fusion disruptions

    New twist in artificial intelligence could enhance the prediction of fusion disruptions

    New application of deep learning allows prediction of disruptions from raw, high-resolution data from fusion energy experiments.

    Scientists Discover New Clue Behind Age-Related Diseases and Food Spoilage

    Scientists Discover New Clue Behind Age-Related Diseases and Food Spoilage

    Berkeley Lab scientists have made a surprising discovery that could help explain our risk for developing chronic diseases or cancers as we get older, and how our food decomposes over time.

    Researchers Overcome the Space Between 
Protons and Neutrons to Study Heart of Matter

    Researchers Overcome the Space Between Protons and Neutrons to Study Heart of Matter

    Nuclear physicists have entered a new era for probing the strongest force in the universe at its very heart with a novel method of accessing the space between protons and neutrons in dense environments. The research, which was carried out at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, has been published in the journal Nature and opens the door for more precision studies of the strongest part of the strong nuclear force and the structure of neutron stars.

    Radio waves detect particle showers in a block of plastic

    Radio waves detect particle showers in a block of plastic

    A cheap technique could detect neutrinos in polar ice, eventually allowing researchers to expand the energy reach of IceCube without breaking the bank.

    Predicting persistent cold pool events

    Predicting persistent cold pool events

    In a multi-institutional field campaign with NOAA and other laboratories, researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are working to better identify and forecast the occurrence of cold pool events.

    Design of the W7-X fusion device enables it to overcome obstacles, scientists find

    Design of the W7-X fusion device enables it to overcome obstacles, scientists find

    Advanced design of the world's largest and most powerful stellarator demonstrates the ability to moderate heat loss from the plasma that fuels fusion reactions.

    Particle beam could help map Earth's magnetic field to understand how space weather impacts the planet

    Particle beam could help map Earth's magnetic field to understand how space weather impacts the planet

    Magnetic field lines that wrap around the Earth protect our planet from cosmic rays. Researchers at PPPL have now found that beams of fast-moving particles launched toward Earth from a satellite could help map the precise shape of the field.

    Topological materials outperform through quantum periodic motion

    Topological materials outperform through quantum periodic motion

    Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have discovered that applying vibrational motion in a periodic manner may be the key to preventing dissipations of the desired electron states that would make advanced quantum computing and spintronics possible.

    January Science Snapshots

    January Science Snapshots

    Dinosaur blood vessels, giant viruses, and antibiotic-building enzymes

    New, Detailed Molecular Roadmap Boosts Fight Against Endometrial Cancer

    New, Detailed Molecular Roadmap Boosts Fight Against Endometrial Cancer

    Scientists have taken an unprecedented look at proteins involved in endometrial cancer, commonly known as uterine cancer. The study offers insights about which patients will need aggressive treatment and which won't, and offers clues about why a common cancer treatment is not effective with some patients.